Artist Groups and In-House Art Model Training

One thing I've always noticed when it comes to local artist group is that they always do lots of art training for new artists. That is especially true when it comes to painting and sketching in the life art segment. Still, when it comes to life art there are two components working together to make…

One thing I've always noticed when it comes to local artist group is that they always do lots of art training for new artists. That is especially true when it comes to painting and sketching in the life art segment. Still, when it comes to life art there are two components working together to make everything come out right. There are of course the artists in the group, and the art life model. It's important to train the artists, but sometimes you have to train the models as well. Let me explain why.

There are many professional organizations and temporary agencies that work with life art models, help them schedule the appointments, and take care of all of the incidentals such as payroll deductions, insurance, and what have you. That's all well and good, but generally they charge five times as much as if your life art group were to hire a local college student, or local bodybuilder to come in and pose for the life art group training session. It really is a matter of cost, and artists are not necessarily the richest people on the planet. Many of them are starving, as is the label; starving artist.

For this reason, perhaps the artist groups need to get together and do in-house art model training and charge the life art models for that training. This would lower the cost for the group to get together, for all those artists to come to the training sessions as they learn their own skills and talents. If everyone is having a learning experience, then a nonprofit art group can not afford to keep its doors open, and serve the most number of people through the community, therefore expanding the number of people involved in the arts in the local area.

Further, there are far too many people who pretended to be models, but can not sit still for very long. Many of them have been involved in photography where the poses change every few minutes, sometimes every few seconds. The same is not true for life art drawing, sketching, and painting. The model may be in one position for up to four hours taking a break every 30 minutes, while someone marks their spot with tape during their breaks.

Training models on how to hold certain positions, how to breathe correctly, and how to go about their business will help them in their future modeling careers, meanwhile the local artist group can help themselves to low-cost life art models which can then again lower the cost to all the participants improving the number of people involved in the local art community. It is a win-win. Indeed I hope you will please consider all this and think on it.