Music for Animal Art

Music can enhance the experience of visual art in several ways. The ambient track offers a defect experience of place. A melody, or a choice of instrument, may establish for us historical or cultural contexts. A track that unfolds dramatically may suggest to the viewer a narrative for the artwork. Explicit sound effects serve to…

Music can enhance the experience of visual art in several ways. The ambient track offers a defect experience of place. A melody, or a choice of instrument, may establish for us historical or cultural contexts. A track that unfolds dramatically may suggest to the viewer a narrative for the artwork. Explicit sound effects serve to animate the visual image. Music for art contributions to art appreciation by creating deeper connections and richer associations with the visual creation.

What then, may distinct music composed specifically for animal art? The animal figure is often presented in closeup. The artist may feature the creature's head, or sometimes even the eye. When the entire animal is presented, the figure generally takes up most of the canvas. Even in the somewhat abstracted animal representation, there is a scientific aspect to animal art. There tend to be a focus on anatomical detail. Indeed, our fascination with this genre is great about wondering at the unique forms that distinguish these beings from ourselves. Secondarily, the artist may present the subject engaged in a typical behavior such as running, foraging, sleeping, or howling at the moon. In many instances, because of the singular focus on the animal subject, we do not enjoy much environmental detail.

Music for animal art, then, can step in to expand on aspects seen and unseen in relation to the animal figure. Consider the portrait presentation of a tiger's head. We appreciate the clear presentation of physical details. Sharp whiskers extend from the intense muzzle like so many white wires. Intricate stripe patterns extend across a wide, sloping brow and around coolly focused but wild eyes. But what is this tiger all about? An active audio track may suggest the incredible speed of a slashing paw, or the sudden leap onto prey. An explicit sound effect, such as a roar, reminds us of the incredible power and ferocity of the beast.

Sometimes the music can heighten for us a mood or condition in the painting which is evident but subtle. Imagine the underwater world of fish. What is our fascination with this environment? Our musical track might offer a suggestion. A slow harp melody with heavy reverberation can create for us a heightened sensation of floating and weightlessness. Through the audio, we swim with the fish. Think about a somewhat humorous picture of a sleeping dog. What is it exactly that makes us chuckle at this image? A few slide trombones trudging heavily through a melody in canon paints with sound our visual representation of canine indolence on a hot summer day. Sometimes the music can provide us with environmental details. An ambient track, for example, may offer evidence of a lion's position deep in the African jungle.

Most expansively, the musical track may offer an entire narrative not explicit at all in the visual representation. Consider an extreme closeup of a reptile's eye. In the painting, a mosaic of green scales, the snake's head, embeds a wild and malicious eye, orange and black. At least part of our fascination with this creepy closeup is what we know or imagine about snakes. The audio feeds the imagination with a presentation which unfolds dramatically. A slightly distorted slide whistle over a single plucked cello is the snake slithering silently through the grass, stopping and starting, as it makes its way gradually to the unsuspecting prey. And then sharp pizzicatos from violins are the minority but deadly strikes, the poisonous bites of the viper.

Music for animal art responds to the strengths and limitations of the genre. Where the visual work must sacrifice background detail, or information about the animal's behaviors, the music may fill in the gaps. Where action is presented in the animal painting, music can animate that action dramatically with explicit sound effects. Music can amplify for us the moods and conditions described in the art. The music laughs with us at the humorous aspect of a barnyard pig. The music shivers with us on the cold Siberian plain as a wolf howls at the moon.

Painting Tips – Using Acrylics Like Watercolor

One of the greatest things about acrylics is that they're very versatile. Many artists use acrylics as their preferred type of paint because of their versatility. Acrylic paints are in fact so versatile that they can be used like other types of paints, including watercolours. Why not just use watercolours? If acrylic can be used…

One of the greatest things about acrylics is that they're very versatile. Many artists use acrylics as their preferred type of paint because of their versatility. Acrylic paints are in fact so versatile that they can be used like other types of paints, including watercolours.

Why not just use watercolours?

If acrylic can be used like watercolours, why do artists not just use watercolors instead of acrylics? There are a few reasons why artists sometimes prefer to use acrylics like watercolours, rather than using watercolours themselves. Watercolours tend to be less forgiving, so if you make a mistake, it's a lot harder to go back and correct it. Mistakes done in watercolours can not be covered up that easily. Watercolours by their very nature can become quite muddy very easily and certain colors do not blend well together. When painting with watercolours you run the risk of putting too much water on to the canvas. This can result in the canvas softening and being more likely to tear.

Layering

Another good thing about using acrylics like watercolours is that you can layer them. With watercolour paintings, you can not really layer them that well. This is because they tend to become muddy very quickly and intermingle; you also run the risk of washing off a pre-existing layer. Rather than there being separate layers, the paint could all mix together and produce something you probably did not want. Acrylics, on the other hand, can be very easily layered on top of each other, even when diluted.

How to acrylic like watercolours

Acrylics can be used like watercolors because they can be easily diluted with water. When they're diluted, they become transparent just like watercolours. Some colors do need more water than others in order to become transparent, so experiment a bit before you start painting. Once acrylics are in a more diluted form, simply use them as you would use watercolours. If you want the pigment to be thicker and creamier, simply add a painting medium to the mixture. The amount of water and painting medium should not exceed the amount of paint.

Mixing tips

Make sure the water you mix acrylic paint with has been filtered or distilled. Ordinary tap water is likely to contain chemicals which can affect the painting's coloring over time. Take care when mixing water with acrylics so you get the dilution exactly right, so it is not too wet or not diluted enough. Start mixing by adding little bits of water to the paint. Take your time when doing this and once the paint begins to soften, mix the water into it with a brush. Try to take note of how much water you used to dilute the paint.

What paper and paintbrush should I use?

Diluted acrylic can be used on canvas, but many artists prefer to use watercolour paper. This particular type of paper tends to be smoother, stronger and more capable of handling larger amounts of water more easily. As for paintbrushes, you should use one that has soft bristles. One of the most popular choices is sable, which is especially good for diluted acrylics because it's soft and loads paint very well. You could also use any good, synthetic brush that's got light and compact bristles.

Advantages

Using acrylics like watercolours allows you to gain the benefits of watercolour paints without the hassle of actually using them. It's very especially good for beginners because it allows them to create a watercolour painting by using a type of paint that's much easier to handle and control. Acrylic paint manufacturers often advise against diluting them because the results can not be guaranteed. Many artists therefore see using acrylic like watercolour as experimental. They enjoy seeing what different results can be produced when using acrylic like watercolour.

A Brief History Of Landscape Painting

Landscapes are now one of the most popular subject-matters in art. However, landscape painting has not always been as popular as it is today. One of the main reasons why it has not always been so popular is because it can be quite difficult. There are many things to think about to create a landscape…

Landscapes are now one of the most popular subject-matters in art. However, landscape painting has not always been as popular as it is today. One of the main reasons why it has not always been so popular is because it can be quite difficult. There are many things to think about to create a landscape painting, such as color, perspective, texture, light … the list goes on and on! Painting landscapes gradually became popular as many artists wanted to tackle the difficulties associated with it.

Renaissance

Landscapes started experiencing a surge of popularity in the Renaissance era. Artists looked back at how the Greeks and Romans published landscapes and learned to appreciate them anew. However landscape painting still was not a subject-matter in its own right. Artists would use landscapes as backdrops for portraits and religious scenes. They gradually learned how to manipulate them to reflect the feelings expressed by the subjects in the foreground.

17th Century

In the 17th Century there were two countries were landscape painting was flourishing: Italy and the Netherlands. After the Northern Netherlands won independence from Spain, people did not want religious figures in paintings because they were associated with Spanish rule. Dutch painters there before started painting Dutch landscapes. Italy and its landscapes became a great source of inspiration for many Dutch painters. Italian painter Leonardo da Vinci was very well known for incorporating highly detailed background landscapes into his paintings. In the late 18th century landscape painting became a subject-matter in its own right and was recognized by royal academies as such. This paved the way for one of American art's first genres, using landscapes to depict American history.

France and Britain

By the 18th century the popularity of landscape painting had spread through Europe. This was thanks in part to people exploring different countries and cultures as part of a grand tour. Several landscape painters gained prominence thanks to their work and innovation. Italian painter Canaletto gained fame for his paintings of Venice. Watteau in France added people enjoying country walks and picnics to its landscapes. English painter Gainsborough would build little models of landscapes to make his paintings more accurate.

Photography

Photographs could capture landscapes exactly as they were. Artists no longer felt the need to port landscapes as accurately as they could. They started experimenting and interpreting landscapes in new and creative ways. New equipment allowed for plein air painting, which grew in popularity very quickly. Many artists would venture out into the world and would spontaneously paint landscapes as they came across them. Social scenes became an intrinsic part of many paintings as artists would capture people enjoying the countryside.

21st Century

Landscape painting remains a popular subject-matter today. Many artists continue to experiment with new equipment, new forms of media and new ways of interpreting landscapes. Some artists combine landscapes with cityscapes, providing a contrast between the natural and the manmade. So long as there are beautiful landscapes out there, landscape painting will always remain popular.

How To Incorporate The Style Of Paul Signac In Your Painting

Who was Paul Signac? Paul Signac was an Impressionist painter who, along with Georges Seurac, developed pointillism. Pointillism is a painting technique wheree thousands of tiny dots of pure color are applied to a canvas very close to one another. One of the main ideas behind pointillism is to use only two to three colors…

Who was Paul Signac?

Paul Signac was an Impressionist painter who, along with Georges Seurac, developed pointillism. Pointillism is a painting technique wheree thousands of tiny dots of pure color are applied to a canvas very close to one another. One of the main ideas behind pointillism is to use only two to three colors of dots in a particular area. The basic idea behind pointillism is that your mind and eye blend the different-colored dots together to create the image when viewed from a distance. There is no set subject matter – pointillism is all about the technique.

Have a look at his paintings

To understand just how pointillism works, take a look at some of Signac's most famous works. Some of these include The Dining Room (1886-87), Sunday (1888-90) and The Women at the Well (1892) among many others. The Dining Room depicts a Parisian family at the dining table having breakfast, while Sunday depicts a typical Parisian couple at home on a Sunday morning. The Women at the Well is a seascape painting which shows two women working at a well, with the sea in the background.

Subject matter

It is important to understand that Signac's style is all about technique. The subject matter can be whatever you want it to be. Signac painted many landscapes, seascapes and paintings depicting daily life. He also did some more abstract paintings, such as Portrait of Félix Fénéon. This particular painting depicts Félix with an abstract background consisting of swirling patterns with loads of different colors. There is no limit to what the subject matter can be – it's entirely up to you.

The size of the dots

When you look at these paintings closely, you'll see how they're composed of thousands of tiny dots. The effect created by this particular style of painting is really quite marvellous. The dots blend together to form a cohesive image. Some of Signac's paintings, such as Sunday, have clearly defined areas and there are lines clearly separating one area of ​​color from another. Take a look at Capo di Noli and you'll see the lines are not as clearly defined. The effect is still the same when viewed from a distance, but Capo di Noli was painted with much larger, more noticeable dots. The different colors that make up a particular area are a lot more noticeable.

Line definition and colors

Some pointillist paintings such as Sunday have two or three colors in one particular area. This helps create more clearly defined areas of the painting. Compare The Papal Palace, Avignon to Sunday to see how differently colors are used. Notice how The Papal Palace, Avignon does not have clearly defined areas and colors – take a look at the water and notice how loose the reflection of the palace is. Now look at Sunday to see how clearly defined all of the lines and different areas of the painting area.

Color theory

Before you get started, you should understand the basics of color theory and the color wheel. The whole point of pointillism is letting the mind create new color by fusing two colors that are on the canvas. So, for example, if there are red and blue dots, from a distance these will blend together to form purple dots. If you're creating a primary color on the canvas, simply use dots of that color. If you're creating a secondary or tertiary color, use different colored dots that will blend together to form the color you want from a distance.

Paintbrushes and colors

First you should decide whether you are going to have small or large dots. Then buy a paintbrush that corresponds with the size of your dots. A round point brush should work just fine for doing a pointillist painting. As for colors, having a lighter and a darker shade of each primary color is a great start. For pointillist paintings, you should not need black paint because black and shadows can be easily created by using other colors, such as blue and darker shades of colors.

Getting started

Do a light sketch of your image on the canvas. Load your palette up with your white, the three primary colors and any extra shades you want, but make sure they do not mix. Start applying dots to the canvas, but try to do one color at a time and always thoroughly wash your brush in between colors. Apply dots densely if the color is the main component of that part of the image and apply them lightly if the color is only a minor component of that part of the image. Make sure the paint does not mix on the canvas and only use a single layer of paint.

Is it OK to overlap dots?

It's OK to overlap dots or have them barely touching, but remember that pointillist paintings lack depth and texture. If you have too many dots overlapping, especially if the dots are large, the painting's going to appear to have more density and texture than the typical pointillist painting should have. This density will give the painting less of a brilliant effect, which is a characteristic of pointillist paintings. The more overlapping dots there are, the less rising than colors there will be. The occasional overlapping dots should not create too many problems, but try to avoid them if you want a painting in the classic pointillist style.

General tips

The act of applying thousands of small dots to a canvas can be monotonous, time-consuming and quite tedious. Take a break every so often to refresh your mind and relax your painting hand. When painting a pointillist painting it is very important to keep stepping back to see how the painting looks. When you look at your painting close close, you should see nothing but dots. You have to keep stepping back so you can keep track of exactly what it is you're painting. Before you get started on your painting, practice on a spare bit of canvas or paper so you can see how the pointillist technique works. It may take a while for you to get the hang of this different technique, but it's definitely worth trying out.

Painting Tips – Should I Use Watercolor or Acrylic Paint?

It is not easy choosing your art supplies. One of the main problems is that there are so many different options out there. It also is not easy choosing paints. If you've never painted before, which one do you choose? This article will focus on acrylics and watercolours. There are a lot of factors that…

It is not easy choosing your art supplies. One of the main problems is that there are so many different options out there. It also is not easy choosing paints. If you've never painted before, which one do you choose? This article will focus on acrylics and watercolours. There are a lot of factors that set the two apart. Choosing the right one for you involves knowing all about each one and deciding which one suits your needs best.

Touching up your painting and drying time

If you want to be able to re-work your painting, you should go with acrylics. They're a lot more opaque and are much easier to manipulate. They dry very quickly and are very forgiving. It's very easy to go back and correct a mistake with acrylics, whereas it's more difficult with watercolours. Although watercolors can dry quickly when you use a hairdryer, their very nature makes it difficult to touch your painting up. If you want to be able to correct yourself as you go along, it's best to stick with acrylics.

Mixing colors

If you want to mix your colors on the canvas, watercolors are the ones to go for. They are very easy to mix and blend together very easily. Acrylics can be mixed in a similar way to watercolours, but watercolours are still the easiest to mix. However, mixing watercolours too much can result in paintings looking unclear and brown.

Painting large areas

Watercolours are great for painting large areas. If you have a large space that does not needlessly need a lot of detail, watercolours will cover it nicely. Mixing a tube of watercolour paint with water can make it cover a large area – at least several yards, in fact. If you want a lot of detail everywhere and want to pay attention equal attention to every part of the painting, acrylics are probably best.

Brushstrokes

With acrylics it's easy to tell where the brush has been. Painting with acrylic leaves brushstrokes on the canvas, whereas painting with watercolors does not leave brushstrokes. If you paint with watercolours, the result is a painting that looks a lot more fluid and organic. Some like brushstrokes to be visible in the paintings, while others do not.

Cost

If it's simply a matter of money, you should go with watercolors because they are usually cheaper. This is because they last much longer than acrylics – you can use several tubes of acrylic paint on a single painting but with watercolors you usually do not even use up a full tube. You also do not need much equipment to paint with watercolours. If you're a beginner it's a good idea to start with the basics and buy more equipment – and more expensive paints – as you get more confident with painting.

Control

Most artists would agree that acrylics are easier to control. When you paint something, the paint lasts exactly where you put it. However, if you're painting with watercolours, it's more difficult to control where the paint goes. Watercolour paints tend to run and blend with each other, making paintings look less realistic. If you want clear definitions and lines, stick with acrylics. If you want your paintings to have a more ethereal, cloudy and less realistic look, go for watercolours.

Technique

Acrylics are very easy to get used to and are very often recommended to beginners because of this. Watercolours need a bit more practice to master because of their fluidity and because it is not as easy to cover mistakes and retouch areas of your painting. With watercolours you have to be extra careful because it's easy for a single drop of water to ruin parts of your painting. Completing a watercolour painting requires a lot more skill and patience than finishing an acrylic painting.

Other factors

With acrylic you can paint on practically anything, including wood, cardboard, plastic and many more. Watercolour paints are best suited to paper, though acrylic can also be painted on to paper. Acrylic tend to have a more layered effect and dry shiny, whereas watercolours dry flat and are not at all shiny. Watercolors usually look the same, no matter how much they cost, whereas with acrylic you get a much nicer result if you use more expensive paints.

Your choice

Ultima it's down to you. Every painter's different and wants different things. If you like the sound of one type of paint, give it a go and see if it works for you. Acrylics are probably best for beginners who are still learning the ins and outs of painting Watercolours are best for those who like their paintings to be fluid, loose and free-flowing. Which one do you think's best for you?

Famous Mark Rothko Prints and Paintings

Mark Rothko pushed abstract art onwards with great momentum thanks to his inciteful paintings that he created purely for others to enjoy. Modern day print reproductions of his work are common and this shows how his work is still appreciated today, many decades after he passed away. Oranges and yellows are key colors in some…

Mark Rothko pushed abstract art onwards with great momentum thanks to his inciteful paintings that he created purely for others to enjoy. Modern day print reproductions of his work are common and this shows how his work is still appreciated today, many decades after he passed away.

Oranges and yellows are key colors in some of his more popular work, with other frequent choices being blue, gray and red. White is used through his abstract spell to provide a powerful contrast, as shown in Red on White.

Early paintings from Rothko covered many different styles and subjects, with portraits being one area in which he was particularly interested in experimenting. It took quite some time for him to find his preferred abstract approach, and this is what he is now best known for. Only those who delve deeply into his work will discover these other methods in which he was involved.

Bands of color cut across huge canvases to create the abstraction with which is instantly recognizable as the work of Rothko from the latter stages of his career. The finest work he produced is now very well taken after and held in many private collections across the world. Some national galleries in London, New York and Washington offer the public the privilegeded opportunity to see some of the originals with their own eyes.

Rothko has donated several pieces to national galleries in order to ensure his work remains accessible to all, with financial gain rarely a motivating factor for most self-respecting artists.

Prints chosen by his international fanbase tend to include Magenta, Black, Green on Orange and No. 2. 61 (Rust and Blue). His abstract approach was so consistent in later years that you can almost choose a piece from his career, which is your own favorite color scheme. It is almost as if choosing a paint palette for your home, and many use these prints as quick and stylish ways to decorate their homes.

You will find that many of his famous paintings are named very simply, this is common for artists from the 20th century. Names often just include the colors used, or even the sequence number which each artwork fell in.

Mark Rothko went on to design a stunning Chapel, which you can still visit. There are sculptures from other artists outside, and this is a great location to enjoy 20th century art while finding a moment of peace for reflection.

What You Need to Paint With Oil

Painting with oils requires a few different pieces of equipment. There are loads of different options out there so it can be a bit overwhelming trying to determine what you'll need. This article will look at the basic supplies a beginner will need to successfully paint with oils. The supplies mentioned can be found in…

Painting with oils requires a few different pieces of equipment. There are loads of different options out there so it can be a bit overwhelming trying to determine what you'll need. This article will look at the basic supplies a beginner will need to successfully paint with oils. The supplies mentioned can be found in any good art store, or online.

Paints

Obviously you'll need some paints, but which make and which colors do you go for? Of all the different brands available, Windsor & Newton is a very good option for beginners – it's quite cheap and it's of a very good quality. As for colors, a good way of keeping the cost down is by buying primary colors and mixing them. You'll need a cool and warm version of red, blue and yellow, along with a white. The following colors are recommended for a basic palette:

– Titanium White (make sure to get plenty of this)
– Cadmium Red
– Alizarin Crimson
– Ultramarine Blue
– Pthalo Blue
– Cadmium Yellow
– Yellow Ochre

Add more colors to your palette once you've experimented with mixing different colors. Some extra colors you could add include:

– Raw Sienna
– Burnt Sienna
Raw Umber
– Burnt Umber
– Cadmium Green
– Viridian
– Ivory Black

This list is by no means exhaustive and is just a guide. By all means choose colors you think would suit your painting.

Palette

Many artists do not even use a traditional palette and just use any old surface! For oil painting you should probably try a wooden or glass palette to start off with. As long as it's big enough to hold your colors and leaves enough room for mixing, it should sit you just fine.

Canvas and easel

A perfect beginner's canvas is a primed, pre-stretched canvas. This is simply a canvas that has been pre-stretched and come mounted on a frame. If a canvas has not been primed and oil paint is applied, the oil will leave dull patches on the painting. In other words, priming prevents the canvas from absorbing too much of the paint. It also makes the surface of the canvas a lot smoother, which allows paintbrushes to flow across the surface more easily. Easels can be extremely expensive, but a cheaper one will do just fine for beginners. A display easel or a French easel will suit beginners; they are reliably cheap and are free-standing.

Linseed oil

Many oil painters use linseed oil as a medium to help colors mix better. All you have to do is have a few tablespoons of linseed oil ready to dip your brush in. Then just mix it in with the colors. As well as enabling colors to mix more easily, linseed oil makes colors glossier and more transparent, so it's useful to have.

Paintbrushes

Choosing paintbrushes is probably the most overwhelming task because the number of paint brushes available is ridiculously high. Luckily you will not need too many painting brushes if you're just starting out. Get at least three sable brushes (one small, one medium and one large) and at least three bristle brushes (again, one small, one medium and one large). It's important that you're comfortable with the paintbrushes you're using so set away a bit more money to invest in good brushes. As well as paintbrushes you should also have a palette knife for mixing colors on your palette and a painting knife, which can be used to apply paint to the canvas. You'll also need a few jars and you'll have easy access to water so you can clean your brushes easily.

Turpentine
Unfortunately, you can not use water to clean up oil paint like you can with acrylics and watercolours. Instead you should use turpentine, which acts as a solvent and thins oil-based paints. It can be used to clean oil paints off brushes, palettes and skin. You should be careful when using turpentine because it can cause a number of problems if inhaled and it can be a fire hazard. For these reasons you should always keep the window open and make sure the room you're painting in is well ventilated. Many artists use mineral spirits instead of turpentine because they do not smell.

Other painting supplies

Some other painting supplies you'll need for painting with oils include news, clothes you do not mind getting messy and a charcoal pencil. You'll need some newspaper, or even paper towels, to clean your brushes. Remember to clean them every time you switch colors or start on a new area of ​​the painting. Wear some clothes you do not mind getting messy because chances are you'll get quite a bit of paint on them. You could just wear an apron, but it's better to just wear spare clothes. Finally, use a charcoal pencil to rough sketch out your painting before you start applying paint to it.

Selecting Your Paints – The Difference Between Oils and Acrylics

When it comes to painting, you may think choosing your paintings is easy. You can buy any type of paintings and just get to work. However, it's not that simple. Each different type of paint has its own different qualities that set it apart from the others. Many artists have their own preferences and use…

When it comes to painting, you may think choosing your paintings is easy. You can buy any type of paintings and just get to work. However, it's not that simple. Each different type of paint has its own different qualities that set it apart from the others. Many artists have their own preferences and use a particular type of paint because it works best for them. I'm going to talk about the main differences between two of the most common types of paint, acrylics and oils. Once you know the main differences between the two, you can then decide which would be most suited to your needs.

Drying time

One of the main differences between acrylic paints and oil paints is their drying times. Acrylic dry really quickly, whereas oils take a lot longer to dry. In fact oils can take up to a few days to completely dry out. This allows you to work with the paint, changing forms here and there till you get the result you want. You can also spend more time on the painting itself, rather than finishing it in a few hours. Acrylics are best suited for someone who intends to finish their painting in a few hours. Oils give you the flexibility to spread your work out over a couple of days.

Surfaces

One of the great things about acrylics is that they can be used on practically any surface. This makes them a great option for beginners as you can use acrylic on surfaces such as paper, cardboard, wood, plastic … the list goes on. As for oils, they should only be used on a board or a prepared canvas. This is because oil paints have a corrosive nature, so they're not suitable for all surfaces.

Cost

Acrylic paints are cheap, whereas oil paints tend to be a bit more expensive. As well as costing more, painting with oils requires more equipment. Oil paintings do have the potential to be a worthy investment because oil paintings can sell for a lot more than acrylic paintings can. However, this is not always guaranteed so if you're sticking to a budget, it's best to stick with acrylics.

How long they think

Because artists have been using oil paints for several hundred years, we know that oil paintings can survive. Oil paintings that survive to this day are usually of a very high quality. One downside is that they do tend to yellow a bit with age. As for acrylics, they have not been around for as long as oils. It's hard to tell whether acrylics would last as long as oils because we do not have any acrylic paintings that are as old as the oil paintings from centuries ago.

Color

Painting with oils allows for a variety of more vivid colors. Oils have more pigments in them and they can create blends of colors a lot more easily because of their slower drying time. Acrylic tend to go a bit darker as they dry thanks to the binder, which turns from white to clear as it dries. Oils tend to stay the same color as they dry.

Correcting mistakes

Because acrylic dry quickly, if you make a mistake, simply wait a few minutes for the paint to dry. Then all you have to do is paint over the mistake. Acrylic can be cleaned from your hands or brushed with plain water. But if you want to clean up oil paints, you'll have to use turpentine or mineral spirits. With acrylics, make sure to clean your brushes quickly because the paint will dry and harden quickly.

Safety

Generally speaking, acrylics are safer than oils. They are non-toxic and do not have a smell, so you can work with them in the smallest of rooms without any problems. As for oils, they're not actually toxic, but they do contain a few chemical substances that should not be ingested. So if you're painting with oils, make sure you're in a big room and have the window open, or at least have the air conditioning on.

What type of painter are you?

Acronyms are probably best for beginners or anyone who is still learning the ins and outs of painting. They are easy to control and blend easily with other colors. Because they dry quickly, if you make a mistake, you can wait for it to dry then paint over it. Oils are probably best for more experienced painters and anyone who wants to spend a lengthy amount of time on their painting. They take several days to completely dry so you can spend hours perfecting your coloring. So if you're just starting out, acrylic paints are the ones to go for. If you're a bit more experienced and can invest a lot of time into a painting, then oil paintings are your best bet. Which one would you go for?

The Distinctive Aspects of Leonardo Da Vinci’s Work or His Inventions

Leonardo da Vinci (15 April, 1452 – 2 May, 1519) was an Italian Resurgence man: inventor, painter, engineer, musician, sculptor, mathematician, architect, cartographer, anatomist, geologist, writer, and botanist. His genius, possibly more than any other, exemplified the Renaissance humanist epitome. He often was labeled as the prime example of the Resurgence man, a person of…

Leonardo da Vinci (15 April, 1452 – 2 May, 1519) was an Italian Resurgence man: inventor, painter, engineer, musician, sculptor, mathematician, architect, cartographer, anatomist, geologist, writer, and botanist. His genius, possibly more than any other, exemplified the Renaissance humanist epitome. He often was labeled as the prime example of the Resurgence man, a person of “unquenchable inquisitiveness” as well as “enthusiastically inventive mind”. He is widely regarded as one of the best painters and perhaps the most distinctly talented person to ever have lived. According to Helen Gardner an art historian, the depth and scope of his likings were without practice and “his personality and mind appeared superhuman, the man himself remote and mysterious.” In addition, it is claimed that despite the various assumptions about Da Vinci, his world vision was basically logical rather than enigmatic, and that the experiential methods he engaged in were rare during his time.

Da Vinci was born out of marriage to a lawyer, and a laborer woman, Caterina, in Vinci within the Florence region, Leonardo got his education in a studio of the well-known Florentine painter Verrocchio. Most of his early working life was done in Milan with the guidance of Ludovico IL Moro. He later on went to work in Bologna, Venice and Rome, and spent his remaining years in France.

Leonardo is, and was well-known mainly as a painter. Amongst works, including the Mona Lisa painting of which is the most well-known and most imitated painting, as well as The Last Supper of which is the most religiously reproduced painting ever, with their prominence coming close to only Michelangelo's Adam Creation. Da Vinci's painting of the Man of Vitruvian is also considered as a cultural icon that has been reproduced on several items such as textbooks, the euro coin, and T-shirts. There are about fifteen of Leonardo's paintings that have lived because of his continuous, and regularly catastrophic, experiences with new methods, and his prolonged postponement. However, several of these works as well as his notebooks, which contained scientific diagrams, drawings, and his views on the method of painting, influenced artists of later generations matched by only that of his existing, Michelangelo.

Da Vinci is accredited for his technological inventiveness. He conceptualized a tank, flying machines, concentrated solar power, the double hull, and the calculator; he also outlined the theory of rudimentary plate tectonics. Comparatively few of his designs were made during his lifetime, but several of his smaller accidents, like the automated bobbin winder as well as the testing machine for the stretchable wire strength, entered the manufacturing world unheralded. Leonardo made significant discoveries in civil engineering, anatomy, optics, as well as hydrodynamics, but failed to publish any of his findings of which had no direct impact on later science.

In conclusion, Leonardo Da Vinci, although he made tireless efforts in teaching himself and becoming knowledgeable in natural sciences, languages, philosophy, history, and mathematics, as a mere listing of the comprehensive contents of his library reveals, he stayed an empiricist of pictorial observation. But then again – thanks to his brilliance – he established his own “theory of knowledge,” distinct in its nature, whereby science and art form a synthesis. In the overall face of Leonardo Da Vinci's achievements of creative brilliance, the question of how much he completed or did not complete becomes meaningless. The heart of the matter is his intellectual force – independent and characteristic in every one of his creations. This force has stayed consistently operational to the present day.

Wearing A Fine Art Necktie Adds Some Class To Your Outfit

What is a necktie? A tie is something that mostly men will wear when then have a long sleeve shirt and a suit. This just looks so much more professional. Not only men wear ties, women can also wear ties. Again as mentioned before, wearing ties just looks so much more professional. So the next…

What is a necktie? A tie is something that mostly men will wear when then have a long sleeve shirt and a suit. This just looks so much more professional. Not only men wear ties, women can also wear ties. Again as mentioned before, wearing ties just looks so much more professional.

So the next question is probably, what is fine art and what does it have to do with ties. These kinds of arts is a form that would create work that is usual some kind of visual arts. It is very intricate. These kinds of arts can be done on any kind of materials.

These kinds of arts can be done on anything like ceramics, cloth or canvas. It will include anything like from normal drawing, it could be printed, it could be designing, it could have films, even photography, it could even be sculptures. As you can see any form of arts would basically form part of this big group.

Making a piece would take some planning. First you need decide what material you would want to use. In this case you would use some cloth. You would have to start drawing the picture you want to be printed on the ties.

The next thing you should do is making sure that the picture you draw is very clear. When you draw the picture make sure that the details of the picture that you are drawing, needs to be clear and very clear. If it is not clear you might find that when the printing is done there will be some smudging that is not always a good thing.

Once your picture is done and you are completely happy with your final result of the drawing, you can take it to a printing company. They will copy the drawing that you drew onto a computer and just double check on the computer that the quality of the picture is good enough to be printed onto a piece of material. Just a little piece of advice, try not to let them print the first attempt on your ties.

Give them a scrap piece of material that is the same color and texture that the ties would be. This will give you a better idea of ​​what it will look like once the picture is finally printed. You will also be able to see if the printing is maybe too light or if the color of the material is maybe to dark.

There should be a problem there is always some time and space to have it fixed before the printing gets done on the actual ties. These ties are very popular. The reason for this is because many famous peoples can be printed on the ties and they sometimes form part of a whole collection. A fancy tie is a necessity.

Pointillism in Art History

What is pointillism? Pointillism is a painting technique where thousands of tiny dots of a pure color are applied to a canvas very close to one another to form an image. The main concept behind pointillism is to use dots of only two to three colors in a particular area. The smaller the dots, the…

What is pointillism?

Pointillism is a painting technique where thousands of tiny dots of a pure color are applied to a canvas very close to one another to form an image. The main concept behind pointillism is to use dots of only two to three colors in a particular area. The smaller the dots, the clearer the painting will be and the sharper its lines will be. The basic idea behind pointillism is that your mind and eye blend the colors together to create the image when viewed from a distance.

Does it have a specific subject matter?

No – pointillism is all about the painting technique. It does not matter what the subject matter is, as long as it's painted with small dots of pure color. There are many famous paintings covering different subject matters that are painted in the pointillist style. Examples include Vincent van Gogh's self-portrait and Paul Signac's Sunday, which depicts a Parisian couple at home on a typical Sunday.

Who developed it?

Pointillism was developed by Impressionist painters Georges Seurat and Paul Signac. Seurat's pointillism painting, Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte, is one of his most famous works and is known throughout the world. This particular painting took over two years to finish and remains the most iconic pointillist painting. Seurat died in 1891 but Signac continued doing pointillist paintings and completed many paintings using the technique.

When did it begin?

In 1886 Seurat and Signac pioneered this painting technique as a branch of Impressionism. Seurat originally called it 'divisionism,' referring to the way the image is divided into many different dots of color. However, art critics were not too favorable and labeled this technique 'pointillism' as an insult to pointillist works. The reason for this was that the criticisms did not think pointillism was as renounced or impressive as other painting techniques. Nowadays, however, the word 'pointillism' is used without the insulting connotations it once had.

When did it reach its peak?

Pointillism reached its peak in the 1880s and 1890s. There are very few artists of note who have done paintings in this style. Part of the reason why pointillism never had a larger impact was because pointillist paintings did not allow for depth or texture. A full range of colors can be produced in a pointillist painting, but pointillism was more about lots of little parts forming a whole. It was all about the technique and getting the eye to join the dots, so to speak. It was never intended to be taken seriously as an art movement, so it was not.

Neo-Impressionism

Although pointillism as a single art movement did not take off as much as other movements, it did form the basis of neo-impressionism. This new branch of impressionism formed a more scientific approach to painting, looking at lines and colors in a more methodical way. This movement started waning by the end of the 19th century, but it influenced key painters such as Vincent van Gogh, Henri Matisse and Paul Gaugouin.

Pointillism today

Pointillism is still used as a painting technique today. It's well past its peak, but many artists continue to be intrigued by it and enjoy creating pointillist paintings. It offers a different way of painting and makes you think of paintings in a different way. It may not be the most influential or well-known of movements, but it's still left a mark.

Tools You Will Need to Start Acrylic Painting

Getting started Acrylics are one of the most popular types of paints because they dry very quickly and can be diluted with water to create a watercolour effect. They are very good at protecting a piece of art because they resist water very well, despite the fact that they can be diluted with it. They…

Getting started

Acrylics are one of the most popular types of paints because they dry very quickly and can be diluted with water to create a watercolour effect. They are very good at protecting a piece of art because they resist water very well, despite the fact that they can be diluted with it. They also show no signs of discolouring, fading or cracking. Beginners often start off with acrylics and take it from there. This article will look at the basic supplies a beginner will need to start painting.

So much choice!

The main problem is that there are so many different supplies available. It can be overwhelming for a beginner to decide what to buy and how much of each item is needed. As long as you have the essentials, you should be all sorted. Basic supplies work just fine for beginners, whether the budget is big or small. As artists get more accredited to acrylic painting and become more adventurous in their work, they tend to then get specialist supplies that meet their exact needs.

What you'll need

The most important basic tools you will need are acrylic paint, a paintbrush and a surface to paint on. You'll also need an easel, a palette, an empty jar, a spray bottle and some paper towels. As well as these you might also need some running water and some protective materials. All of these basic supplies can be found at any good art supplies store and there are loads of websites offering good deals for supplies as well. Note that online shopping tends to have cheaper prices and a larger variety of products.

How many colors will I need?

It can be difficult determining exactly how many colors are going to go on your palette. It's probably harder deciding what colors are going to go on it. For a basic, beginner's palette you should probably have white and the primary colors, red, blue and yellow. Add a few different shades in if you can, but if not, the three primary colors plus white should do just fine. Experiment with mixing and finding new colors. As you become more advanced, you can move away from mixing primary colors and focus on more specialist colors.

What type of paintbrush?

There are loads of different types of paintbrushes to choose from. The only way you're going to find the one best suited to you is by giving a few a go. Try out some different shapes, makes and sizes and see which one you feel most comfortable with. You should only need a few brushes to complete your painting. Brushes that shed their bristles easily tend to be cheaper, while the more expensive ones do not shed their bristles that easily.

What do I paint on?

The best painting surface for a beginner is a canvas. You do not necessarily need an easel if you're prepared to paint on a flat, horizontal surface, but it's much easier having your canvas face you on an easel.

What's everything else for?

Have a spray bottle handy and every so often spray a bit of water over your palette. This keeps it from drying out faster. You'll need a jar to store brushes and another, bigger one with plenty of water in to wash and rinse off your brushes. Before you get started, make sure all surfaces close by protective materials that you do not mind getting paint on, such as an old cloth. Have access to water so you can prime your jar and wash your hands. Paper towels are handy for wiping brushes and washing your hands with.

Get the basics and go from there

Do not let yourself get overwhelmed by the vast amount of different products out there. When you go shopping for supplies, just choose the basics and go from there. Once you've got the hang of it, be adventurous: try different types of paintbrush, new colors and new surfaces to paint on. There are so many options, but it's always good to start off with the basics.

How to Use the One Stroke Painting Technique

What is the one stroke painting technique? As its name suggests, the one stroke painting technique simply means you achieve everything in just one stroke. This includes shading, highlighting and blending – you get all this from a single stroke instead of having to use multiple strokes. All you have to do is load different…

What is the one stroke painting technique?

As its name suggests, the one stroke painting technique simply means you achieve everything in just one stroke. This includes shading, highlighting and blending – you get all this from a single stroke instead of having to use multiple strokes. All you have to do is load different colors on to a flat brush. It can be used on a variety of different surfaces.

Is it for beginners or advanced painters?

Both! Even though the one stroke painting technique was developed with beginners in mind, it's fully accessible to everyone. People who have never painted before find it just as enjoyable as people who've been painting for years. One of the reasons why it's become so popular is because it's so accessible and easy to learn. It's attracted lots of new people to painting and it's intrigued and caught the attention of many professional painters.

Who came up with the idea?

The one stroke painting technique was devised by American author and artist Donna Dewburry. She paints flowers and animals in her demonstrations, but the technique can be used to paint practically anything. Why has this painting technique become so popular? Simply because it allows you to very quickly and easily create very beautiful works of art.

How do I load my paintbrush?
For one stroke painting you should use paintbrushes developed by Donna because they are best suited for this technique. On her website there are loads of different options to choose from. To load your paintbrush, simply make little puddles of paint on your palette. Dip one corner of your brush into one color then turn it over and dip the corner into the other color. Keep stroking the brush back and forth across the paint to fully load it. You can add as many different colors as you want, but for beginners, it's best to start off with two.

How do I do the strokes correctly?

Brushes are usually flat and have a chiselled edge. To do a typical stroke, simply have the brush standing on the chisel edge then press down while moving the brush and ending up on the chiselled edge. The more pressure you apply, the wider the stroke will be. Move the paintbrush in different to create different effects. A good way to practice different techniques is to paint different flower petals.

Flower petals

To create a teardrop petal shape, have the paintbrush on the chisel edge then press down so the bristles bend. Then pivot the paintbrush around till you've created a teardrop shape and lift the paintbrush up to the chisel. Thin, pointed petals are very easy to do; simply lean down on the chisel and slide the paintbrush up to the tip of the petal and release. Twist the paintbrush to have the petal bend. Petals with jagged edges are done by pushing down on the bristles and slowly wiggling the paintbrush up. When you're near the tip of the petal, smoothly slide the paintbrush the rest of the way and lift it up to the chisel edge. Then reverse the direction of the bristles and lean down on them. Work your way down to the base of the petal by applying pressure to the paintbrush and slide slowly back to the base.

Many possibilities

The examples given are just a few of the many different things you can do with one stroke painting. Although it's easy to get started, you need to practice to become really profitable at it and flower petals are good practice for beginners. The more you use this painting method, the more you realize how much potential it has. You can use all sorts of different colors and different types of paintbrushes to create different effects. People even decorate household items using this technique. The possibilities are endless!

How to Use a Painting Knife

What is a painting knife? A painting knife is a knife that has a pointed tip and a flexible steel blade. The blade can come in a variety of different shapes and sizes. For example, it can be in the shape of a rectangle, a triangle or even a diamond. The main part of the…

What is a painting knife?

A painting knife is a knife that has a pointed tip and a flexible steel blade. The blade can come in a variety of different shapes and sizes. For example, it can be in the shape of a rectangle, a triangle or even a diamond. The main part of the blade is lowered from the wooden handle like a trowel. This is to prevent the artist's hand from coming into direct contact with the paint on the canvas. Painting knives look a lot like metal spatulas.

So why do artists use painting knives?

Painting knives are mainly used for applying paint on to a canvas. Because they come in different shapes and sizes, a variety of different effects can be produced. Using a shooter blade can create angular strokes, while using a longer blade makes it easier to put down a long stroke of color in one go. Painting knives can also be used instead of a brush and are useful for adding texture to a painting. Using a painting knife to apply paint is similar to buttering a piece of bread.

Is not it the same as a palette knife?

The two are often confused because they are very similar. Palette knives have a flexible, blunt blade that's straight and wide with a rounded edge. Palette knives are more suited to mixing oil and acrylic paints on a palette, hence their name. Many people do refer to painting knives as palette knives and vice versa, even though they are different.

How do I use one?

Scrape the knife across the surface of the paint, as if you were getting butter or jam on to a knife. Hold the handle firmly with a tight grip and use your wrist if you want to change the angle of the knife in relation to the canvas. The simply apply the paint like you would apply butter or jam to some bread. It's that easy, even though it is a bit different from using an ordinary brush. There are a few different techniques that can be used for extra effects.

Different effects

You can produce very thin lines of color by dipping the knife edge into some paint then gently tapping the knife on to the canvas. Or you can spread the paint around as if it were butter, smearing it on to the canvas. This way you can have a completely flat texture. If you want ridges in your paint, simply life your knife up from the surface of the paint as you go along. You can even use the tip of the blade to scratch into wet paint, creating a variety of different effects; the sharper the knife's edge, the finer the line will be. You can even alternate the pressure as you apply the paint, creating different effects in a single go.

What paintings can be used?

The good thing about painting knives is that they can be used with any types of paint, even watercolours. You'll get better effects if you use a paint that is quite consistent and retains its form, as well as any marks you make with the knife. A handy hint for using acrylic is to add a bit of modeling paste so the paint will be a bit thicker. Beware that some additives can affect how long it takes paints to dry. Additives can help retain imprints and add to the overall consistency of the paint.

Experiment

This article has given an overview of painting knives and some ideas as to what they're used for and how to use them. If you've always painted with brushes and fancy trying something different, go for a painting knife. Experiment with different paints, colors, and techniques. Learn how the knife can add different effects to your painting and implement these into your next work to add texture and depth.

5 Ways You Could Be Using Body Painting to Earn Money

If you have some artistic talent and are looking for a way to earn a little extra cash, then you might want to take the time to consider body painting! For a long time, face painting at kids parties and special events has been a popular activity and many makeup artists are able to earn…

If you have some artistic talent and are looking for a way to earn a little extra cash, then you might want to take the time to consider body painting! For a long time, face painting at kids parties and special events has been a popular activity and many makeup artists are able to earn some money from offering this type of service. However, if you also include body painting you can actually earn even more, because you will expand your customer base to include adults and even open up the opportunity to work with corporate clients at promotional events. Here is a list of the top x ways to earn money from body painting.

Top 5 Ways To Earn Money From Body Painting

1. Parties and Celebrations

One of the best ways to earn money from body painting is to book clients who are having a party or special celebration. One of the most common celebrations where body painting comes up is for bachelorette parties. The girls will love getting fancy designs applied before hitting the club and it makes a great alternative to dressing up! It is a good idea to give everyone matching designs even if they all have them on separate body parts! Do not forget to pass out your business card!

2. Baby Bump Portraits

One of the growing trends right now is for pregnant ladies to have their baby bump decorated for a photo shoot. Be sure to use only very gentle body paints as pregnancy can cause skin irritation. Try to think of lots of round designs that will work well on a bump! Popular designs are pumpkins, flowers and hearts, but you can be as creative as you like!

3. Promotional Events

Local businesses will love having you paint a promotional model's body with their logo. It is a great form of advertising at open days and other events that will get people talking!

4. Contact Local Performers

Consider getting in touch with local dance groups, theaters and other performers who may be able to make use of your talents. This may include circus performers and burlesque acts so do not forget to think outside of the box!

5. Teach Others Your Skills

Another great money spinner is to offer classes teaching others to apply body paint. This has very little outlay apart from your supplies and can be connected in small groups in your own home or at the student's home. You can start by offer basic techniques and build up to advanced classes featuring more detailed designs.

These are just a few of the many ways that you can earn some money from body painting. There are lots of ways to utilize your skills if you make the effort to look for them and to market yourself effectively.