Getting The Right Tools To Try Out Face Painting

Face painting is a great and entertaining hobby, and it is one that you can learn so long as you have the correct supplies and tools. In this article we will be looking at the equipment that you will need in order to start painting, without the necessity to spend large sums of money on…

Face painting is a great and entertaining hobby, and it is one that you can learn so long as you have the correct supplies and tools. In this article we will be looking at the equipment that you will need in order to start painting, without the necessity to spend large sums of money on expensive supplies.

Choosing The Right Paints

Not all paintings are the same, and you will find that they vary in quality. You should try to buy the best quality face paintings that you can, ones that are made specifically for face painting, and ones that are cosmetic grade as they are less likely to be harmful to the skin. Skin friendly face paintings are important and even more so if you are painting young children as their skin is likely to be more sensitive and prone to irritation. For the more serious face painter, one who wishes to branch out into body art, there are other paintings available that include body glitter and temporary tattoos.

Important Application Equipment

When it comes to brushes, you can use any regular art brushes so long as they are new and not been used with other kinds of paints. There are many different types of brushes that are available for face painters and there are plenty of specialist brushes which are made specifically for face painters. They are available in varying sizes and styles and are typically made from sable or synthetic material. When you first go out to buy brushes you should look into buying around 6 or 7 brushes and in different sizes.

An additional piece of equipment that you will need to buy is sponges. The sponges you should look at buying are the same ones that you would use to wash your car, and the great thing is they are big, so you can cut them into smaller pieces, so they work out to be good value for money. Of course, you can buy specialist face painting sponges if you want, however, try to avoid using make-up sponges as these are unsuitable for face paintings. Additional supplies that you should include are, wet wipes a mirror, tissues and a spray bottle.

It's a great hobby and it can let your creative side flow whilst at the same time bringing entertainment and enjoyment to children and adults alike. You will also find that your hobby can become a nice little money spinner once you have reached a certain level of experience.

Artistic Painting Ideas – Some Help to Get You Going

Are you an artist looking for some painting ideas? It happens to all of us, sooner or later. There you are facing a blank white surface and it's time to squeeze paint onto a palette, load up the paintbrush and make that first mark. But, the moments tick by and unable to commit, the surface…

Are you an artist looking for some painting ideas? It happens to all of us, sooner or later. There you are facing a blank white surface and it's time to squeeze paint onto a palette, load up the paintbrush and make that first mark. But, the moments tick by and unable to commit, the surface remains untouched and haunting.

Have you ever watched children at play? A broom becomes a horse, a stick transforms into the most magnificent magical wand, the trees in the field are seen as massive soldiers threatening the stalwart defenders and a blanket throw over the picnic table makes a safe cave for adventurous heroes and heroines. Give these same children some art materials and they are all likely to dive right in.

Their play-filled approach and unhindered curiosity allows them to create with apparent abandon. Life becomes more complicated as we enter adulthood and this easy creativity sometimes gives way to a world filled with should do this and should not do that. We sometimes find ourselves bound up and unable to take action when we enter the studio. No matter how much one may want to take a playful approach to that threatening white expanse the moments between intenting to start and actually starting starting to pile up.

Time to clean the studio
When the artistic painting ideas are not flowing it's definitely time for an artist to step away from the canvas. But do not leave the studio entirely; stick around and focus on getting some chores done. You would be surprised at how many artists use cleaning up their studio as a way to get themselves going when the muse does not visit right away.

  • Sort through and organize tubes and pots of paint
  • make a list of what needs replacing the next time you make an art supplies order
  • Do the same with brushes, mediums, gesso, etc.

De-cluttering the workspace and swishing things up in general can work to clear up that foggy mind. Also you are still in the studio, actively handling your art materials and logging the time so you will not be as caught up in those feelings of failure as an artist. Beside, painting is way more fun than cleaning and it usually is not long before an idea appears out of now where that prompts you back to the easel.

A few more tricks to get your artistic painting ideas flowing

If your studio is all tidied up and the artistic painting ideas or inspiration is still yet to strike, here are a few more ideas to consider:

  • Get out stretcher bars and pliers and stretch some canvas
  • Gesso the newly stretched canvases
  • Read art books and magazines
  • Visit the library and check-out a new art book
  • Go online and peruse other artists websites
  • Take your camera for a walk
  • Check out a new show at your local art gallery
  • Make a collage using materials that are easily at hand – magazine clippings, scraps of material, wall-paper, sections of old paintings and drawings, etc.
  • Paint on top of your collage work
  • Listen to music and paint what you hear

If the dry spell continues maybe it's time to experiment with a new medium. Even a seasoned professional artist will sign up for an art class every once in a while to learn new techniques and stimulate new painting ideas. They know that when creativity seems to be stymied it's likely time to strike out in a new direction. You can get some ideas from this article on how to inspire creativity in your art, 10 tips to get you going .

Anyone Can Be An Artist: We’re Born To Create

Drawing and Painting are the most basic means of creative expression for any human being and nurturing that desire in our children is imperative. I really feel that as a Mom, I am my daughter's first teacher, not only in Art, but in everything. It is my obligation and privilege to show her new things,…

Drawing and Painting are the most basic means of creative expression for any human being and nurturing that desire in our children is imperative. I really feel that as a Mom, I am my daughter's first teacher, not only in Art, but in everything. It is my obligation and privilege to show her new things, bringing new experiences to her world and share with her endless capabilities that lie ahead for her in this life.

As an artist, it was natural for me to want to draw and paint with her from the time she was old enough to finger paint and scribble. Knowing that I would instantly want to introduce her to art, I did not consciously make an effort to teach her. I just let her explore. We had pencils, paints, chalk and other art materials available to her and she was traditionally drawn to them, no pun intended! As soon as she realized she could create something, she was hooked! I still have piles of her scribbles that mean so much to me being her first creations. Most of the time she would tell me what they were and I would note the descriptions on them. Her early works were of the abstract nature. It was amazing to see how she communicated so much for someone so new to this life. I realized that even without my influence on my child, drawing and painting for kids is just something that comes naturally. The want to create is there from the beginning. I wonder how many of us forget it was ever there?

I have not been able to paint much personally since my daughter was born. Working full-time and being Mom to a beautiful 5 year-old daughter has kept me busy. Deciding that I wanted to create this website has sparked my creative juices again. I'm creating … just digitally now. I'm learning new things, having new ideas and molding and shaping them into what you see here. I make notes as the ideas swirl around sometimes afraid those little wisps of inspiration will leave me.

Many Moms out there are not artists and may feel they can not guide their children in drawing and painting without being an accomplished artist. Some may think they are crafty, great at cooking or fantastic at writing but not drawing or painting because they're not naturally skilled at art. That is the farthest thing from the truth. Anyone can learn to draw and paint. That is the truth.

I have seen so many people learn to create and surprise themselves with their own abilities. After 15 years, it still inspires me when I teach to see them blossom as artists. Many artists do not like to share that. They enjoy keeping their talents a secret as something special just for them. Well, I'm not one of them. I believe in sharing those skills with anyone that simply wants to learn. My goal is for all Moms to be their child's first Art Teacher, show them what's possible and let them do the rest. Draw and paint with your child. Remember you were born to create.

Artist Interview: Stephanie Ayers – Painting Stories Into Art

“Painting is one of my ways of clearing my ever busy mind. My passion right now is sharing my God-given talent with others. Texas Hill Country artist Stephanie Ayers is a wife, mother of two and a self-tainted painter. Painting, cooking, fishing, and gardening come naturally to her and she enjoys sharing art, food and…

“Painting is one of my ways of clearing my ever busy mind. My passion right now is sharing my God-given talent with others.

Texas Hill Country artist Stephanie Ayers is a wife, mother of two and a self-tainted painter. Painting, cooking, fishing, and gardening come naturally to her and she enjoys sharing art, food and flowers with others. Stephanie laughs, “I've shared the fish too but typically I only catch one inch perch.”

The very small town where she was an elementary student was one building, Pre-K through 12th grade, “… being one of two semi-talented kids in the entire town I thought I was the only girl my age IN THE WORLD that knew how to make art. My first memory of painting is when I first entered school. Then it seemed so complicated and difficult to control.

With that in mind, upon moving to Waco to finish college she found herself in, as she puts it “this HUGE new school … I was like, 'Um no … Wait … there are other people my age that can color in the lines and make advanced stick figures? Hmm. ' it took me a while to forgive that one. ”

How long have you considered yourself an artist?

Honestly I never thought of it until recently. It has taken me 33 years to realize its OK to say you're an artist. I do not know why but I always felt timid to talk about my art or even admit I drew or painted something … in the last three years I've come to terms with my talents and am totally embracing it and having such a fun time in the process. I used to always feel that the art I created was worthless and hated compliments. Wish I could have … stayed positive.

Image was fun when I finished basics and got to really learn about things that interest me. My degree is still not completed; my majors have ranged from art education, elementary education, child development, animal behavior, to biology. I'll figure out what I want to be when I grow up … someday. Maybe I'm supposed to have a famous local Texas artist … that sounds nice.

What things inspire you to create art?

Inspiration is everywhere for me, though, it comes and goes. When I was about six or seven someone special to me said my self-portrait was nothing but trash and to never do that again. That shattered my little mind. I recall thinking it looked great to me; I did everything that guy Bob said to do on my little black and white television. So, getting my mojo back took some time and lots of positive reinforcement. Now … a simple tweet from a bird inspires a whimsical doodle. Sometimes it's a cooking magazine. Reading to my kids has had the most inspiration on my “home” art. The silliest things come across in my mind as paintings and drawings. For example the neighbor's cat just after a nap stretching and yawning so big, my son teaching his little sister what a octagon and pentagon are with sidewalk chalk … these things get my artistic juices flowing. I love Day of the Dead art because I feel like it represents … lots of memories … a person, their family, it has love, loss, happiness. The art can be so simple and some so intimate, but either way it means something, to someone.

What are you trying to convey through your art?

What I mean or what I'm feeling really depends on the piece I'm working on. For example, one of my kids' books we read almost every evening has multiple short stories in it with fun illustrations. Those illustrations inspired me to do similar things for my kids. When we read the stories we refer to my version of the painting. It's educational for the kids and heartwarming for mommy.

When I'm in adult mode most of my paintings really have a story. I see and feel something when I finish a painting; it's telling a story without all the pages and typing. It means one thing to me but I love hearing what it means to others, what they feel when they see something I've done.

Tell me about artistic influences.

My Aunt Janice was my first influence. She was my dad's sister and she amazed me at an early age. She could sing like Patsy Cline and she could draw the prettiest horses and roses I ever did see. Through the years and traveling I've come to love Frida Kahlo, Diego Rivera, Fernando Botero, and Chagall. Mexican and Latin artists have always drawn my eyes. I suppose it's the brilliant colors, the way you can almost taste the passion, like in Diego's frescoes … and the way Frida's art was a direct reflection of her life. She inspires and influences me the most as far as famous artists go. I can relate to her life as if it was my own sometimes. I took an art bus tour of Mexico once. Seeing firsthand the environment that Frida must have lived in … smelling the air … tasting the foods … from coffee shops to cobblestone roads I wanted to be like Frida Kahlo. On the outside she seemed so talented, so sexy, so confident … but through her art you could feel her physical pain. Mangled body, inability to conceive, pain, suffering, her always cheating husband, lovers … take a look you'll know what she felt by what she painted. Frida Kahlo not only is a huge influence in my art but a huge inspiration in my life.

How else has traveling itself influenced you?

Travel … lots. All over Texas, the US Israel, Kuwait, Amsterdam. There was a time when my husband and I were really into crises. In 2009 or 2010 while living in Kuwait I entered the Harper's Bazaar Magazine for the Middle East female artist contest. I probably created 15 watercolors, framed and ready for sale in two weeks. Although they did not select me it was fun doing painting again and getting the hair / make-up professionally done for the photographer. This was actually when I started really painting again. I've had a painter's block for about 8 years. My art used to be very dark and depressed, as was my life at times. Reflections of my happiness and spirituality are obvious in my art now.

Tell me about your creative process, from the beginning of a work to its completion:

I work with watercolor, ink on paper; acrylic, ink on canvas; and I also use adhesive required for odds-and-ends, usually some form of organic material. Watercolor has always been easy for me and now that I've had the means and the desire I am constantly learning new tricks. If I am working with watercolor things flow rather well. Sketch, erase, agree, argument with myself, agree, mentally place colors … then paint. Once this starts I work in a color circle. I used to paint typically on the floor; since my personal artistic revival I now have a studio space set up in my home with a proper desk and lighting. I start with one color and paint as much as I can of that one color. That dries and I do another color. I turn the paper as I go. When I'm working on multiple watercolors the same applies. I set out with … let's say four different pieces … all watercolors. I use one color turning each artwork around until I've fulfilled that color need … then move onto the next painting with the same color and same process. By the time I've made a full circle usually it's dry and I can start on a new color. If required this is when I cut, paste, apply, glue, adhere mixed media to a piece. Let the glue dry … then onto the next step. 99% of the time I use ink and detail each to a final happy signature.

To be honest sometimes I've had an idea in mind and from start to finish it's taken me only hours. Then there are those times when I'm doing something that is really emotional, personal, something that requires my full attention … that can take anywhere from days to a month to complete. So far, a month is the longest amount of time I've worked on one piece of art … I'm pretty sure if I did not have a deadline in order to travel to Boston, MA it would have taken me even longer minus the very late nights. As my kids get older and do not require my attention as much I hope to be able to focus my energy on taking my time. It's great cheap therapy.

When I'm working with acrylic I typically pencil out something on the canvas. I've never been very good at sketching something out first. I always jump in pencil first and end up with lots of eraser debris on the floor until sometimes something sticks and off I go. Acrylics are so new to me. I start with background typically, and then head to the focal point. I also try to use one color at a time to waste less. I've learned that acrylics need time to dry but if ya do not like it when it's dry you can do it all over again. Since using acrylic is new to me I have been keeping most of my pieces pretty simple so they typically only take about a week but some have taken almost two. I have ideas that end up on canvas and get painted but once I step back I often hate them, which frustrates me because this only happens with acrylics. I will do a project over and over ending in more frustration. I have found I do not feel like I'm in total control of the paint. When I use watercolors I know how much water to apply for each use. I know what brush works best for each application. With acrylics I do not have the experience or the training yet for that type of painting to flow. That's the great thing about the internet I can upload some YouTube videos – Acrylic 101. In recent months I have learned how to use mixed media better in my acrylic painting process.

What plans do you have for the future of your art?

Right now it's a whirlwind of excuse for me. I'm painting all the time and have ideas come to mind 24/7. This has been the longest stretch of having my artist mojo in … well forever. I hope the future brings new exhibit opportunities, increase in orders for custom work, I hope for a few sales, and I can not wait to see what I learn. Hopefully I will be able to show on a smaller scale and maybe even put on a show myself.

Do you have any advice for emerging artists?

Surround yourself with more artists and establish a good network in the art community.

Tell me something of an artistic quirk you have.

Whales. Either with crayon, pencil, paint, or dirt whales WILL be drawn at least once a day around here. My little ones really have a liking to them. These tend to be for fun, however, I do have one “work-in-progress” whale artwork, yet to be unveiled.

How do you promote your art both on and off the internet?

My first sales were at TAMUCC at a small open art festival type event. Very low-key but sold all my little ink drawings and cards I created for 5 bucks a pop I was stoked … being a poor college woman. Word of mouth is effective and I have enhanced this with having professional business cards to help with referrals.

This is the beginning phase of having real experience getting my name and works out there. The April 2013 event, RAW artists presents: Marvel was my debut show in Austin. It was great exposure and I learned so much. All this encourages my creative spark and I keep on painting, so much new art to see, and keep looking – there will be more.

Art prints of my work are available at my Paintingforyou site which I have personally ordered from and approve of their quality. My official web page is not ready to go live just yet. I'm currently using social media and various internet sites and finding out what works best.

There Isn’t Any Good Art in Oxnard California She Said – Oh Nonsense I Told Her

A few months back I was in Ventura, California on Main Street checking out the art, antiques, gift shops and cool thrift stores. I was also admiring the Art Walk in the downtown area while I was there, and strolled through several very cool galleries. I was impressed with what I saw and realized I…

A few months back I was in Ventura, California on Main Street checking out the art, antiques, gift shops and cool thrift stores. I was also admiring the Art Walk in the downtown area while I was there, and strolled through several very cool galleries. I was impressed with what I saw and realized I did not get to see it all on that trip, so I decided I'd schedule another soon. I did find one thing ratheruclear, a lady asked me where I was from and I noted in the Channel Islands area. She said; “Oh, you mean Oxnard?” and then she proceeded to tell me; “There is not any good art in Oxnard.”

Well, I thought to myself what a bunch of hooey, baloney, malarkey and poppycock. Sure there is, in fact go to the downtown area of ​​Oxnard sometimes, it's everywhere. Yes, everywhere. Check out BG's Café, the A-Street Café, and Thomas Café. They have as much art on the wall as many galleries do. The gal I was speaking with in Ventura seemed make her statement “matter-of-factly” as if it were true, there could be no debt and that was the end of it. Well, guess what, she was wrong, “dead wrong” and you can quote me on that one, just ask; Roberto Valle Garcia.

Just recently, I had the privilege of meeting the executive director of the Downtown Oxnard Merchant Association there and he has been doing art exhibitions, street walks, and finding empty buildings for temporary galleries to support the arts, local artists and his association has been overseeing grants and events for as long as anyone can remember. “No art in Oxnard?” Bull!

Indeed, the Oxnard Downtown Merchant Association not only supports the arts, they even had art exhibited by the Artists Melting Pot of Channel Islands at their annual meeting – how many downtown organizations host their annual meeting with gallery exhibit level art as part of their presentation and program – none that I know of. Anyone who thinks that there are not talented artists in the Oxnard, Channel Islands and Port Hueneme area, clearly does not know what the hell they are talking about and you can quote me on that.

Not only do they have art, much of it is truly incredible and the diversity of culture is alive and well, even the guy who runs the local mortuary painted a giant mural on one of his buildings – so believe you-me they have enough art for your entire life experience and beyond that! You know what I think? I think the artists groups in Ventura have been self-promoting so long, they've begun to believe their own line of BS about art in the rest of this great county. Oxnard has art, it's everywhere – so go visit downtown and you'll see.

Brian Kielt: Ashes To Ashes

Brian Kielt is a Visual Artist living and working in Northern Ireland with painting, drawing and photography. His practice in Figurative, Neo-Expressive art revolves around personal experiences, mythology and a sense of mortality / fragility. Brian creates artworks in oil, charcoal, pencil, pastels, photography and mixed media. Tell me how you began creating in your…

Brian Kielt is a Visual Artist living and working in Northern Ireland with painting, drawing and photography. His practice in Figurative, Neo-Expressive art revolves around personal experiences, mythology and a sense of mortality / fragility. Brian creates artworks in oil, charcoal, pencil, pastels, photography and mixed media.

Tell me how you began creating in your current medium:

I first used Oil when creating a painting in school at 14. Since being used only acrylics or watercolours, there was definitely a learning curve. It began as mud and then slowly the realization came that cleaning and preparation was half the battle with Oils. I first experimented mixing Oils with other medium when I was halfway through my Fine and Applied Arts course in Belfast in 2007. I have not looked back but I'm still constantly pushing the materials and developing my practice with them.

How long have you considered yourself an artist?

3 years. During university I always felt I was in a bubble and so the 'art student' tag fitted me perfectly. Once I left university I was forced to stand on my own two feet, find a studio, sustain my practice and apply for competitions; which is when I felt that my professional Artist career began.

What things inspire you to create art?

People mostly. We are fascinating. The figure is usual extremely prevalent in my work. Memory and experience go hand in hand in my opinion and so they jump in from time to time, especially when an experience triggers a said memory or vice versa.

What are you trying to convey through your art, and what does it mean to you?

The fragility between life and death. Mortality interests me a lot because I lost quite a few close friends and family members over a short period of time and it was a dark point in my life. This time still haunts and inspires me at the same time. I try to figure out why it scares and excites.

Tell me about effects, if any:

Francis Bacon is a massive influence on my work. He blew open what it was like to explore the human condition through the medium of paint. Gerhard Richter, Hughie O 'Donoghue, Paul Nash and Edvard Munch also spring to mind immediately. There are so many influences beyond painting as well.

Photography can trigger an idea for a painting or a large-scale drawing quicker than a painting by someone else because you can immediately see what you would do in your own style, your stamp; rather than deciphering someone else's paint / handwriting and then building it up again.

Local artists are a huge inspiration to me. Eoin McGinn, David Lee Badger, Louise Younger, Craig Donald and Gemma O'Hare came through the same university system with me so I have had the privilege of seeing their work from day one; watching it develop and grow. We all feed each other's creativity so the idea of ​​a bubble in university has lingered on in some regards!

Tell me about your creative process, from the beginning of a work to its completion:

It usually starts with a found image or maybe a quick 5 minute sketch of someone / something. I either blow the sketch up on a projector or develop it from hand onto the painting surface (varies from canvas to board). Then layering of charcoal drawing, washes of turpentine and oil paint repeats itself until either it is finished or I can go no further that sitting because I will destroy the work if I try to fix it. If I can not finish it in one sitting, I let it stay on my wall for a week and begin another. If inspiration still has not come after a week I hide the painting for a month and then take it out to view it with fresh eyes. The layering process either begins again or I wipe the image clean and start another.

What exposure have you had?

I won a competition for the Stendhal Arts Festival in 2011 for a portrait of a fellow artist. I have since had several exhibitions in Belfast: Culture Night Belfast 2011 & 2012, Ulster Bank Arts Festival and Opening Exhibition at the Muse Gallery in December 2012 to name a few. I had a review about my work recently in an online magazine which was great!

What is the most annoying remark made to you about your art?

There have been a few but the one that sticks out the most was “So, when are you going to get a real job?” It took a while to laugh my way past that one.

Do you have any regrets in your life as an artist?

I do not really believe in regrets but perhaps being more disciplined than I can be at times.

What plans do you have for the future of your art?

I'm in the middle of organizing my first solo exhibition for the end of this year; there is Culture Night 2013 in September in Belfast where I and fellow Artists are planning something a little different to the usual proposals. Generally I hope to gain more exposure for my work which will enable me to continue my practice and develop as an Artist.

Do you have any advice for emerging artists?

No one ever knows it all. We are all constantly learning so the one thing I would encourage for anyone starting off is to keep an open mind in all areas of your work and to create something first instead of questioning it. If you ask why before it's even made, then there is no point in making it in the first place.

I try to sketch for at least an hour each day. This loosens your brain up and a little mark here or there can lead to something else.

Have you sold any of your art, if so how?

I have sold several pieces, mainly through the group exhibitions I have been involved in.

How do you promote your art both on and off the internet?

I'm one of the founding members of the LOFT collective, a group of emerging visual artists based in Belfast's city center. Together we enhance our individual practices – ranging from painting, sculpture, photography, web design and many more – as well as collaborate on group projects and exhibitions.

I have open studio days where the public can come up to view my work and see my process. On the internet I use my blog , Facebook and Twitter primarily although I'm also on LinkedIn.

Art and Seredipity

Art and Serendipity For an aspiring painter it's possibly gratifying to know that sometimes the making of what we call 'great art', the priceeless stuff that survives in National Galleries and the closed bunkers of billionaires, owes a great deal, if not all, to sheer accident. By 'accident' I mean that they are the result…

Art and Serendipity

For an aspiring painter it's possibly gratifying to know that sometimes the making of what we call 'great art', the priceeless stuff that survives in National Galleries and the closed bunkers of billionaires, owes a great deal, if not all, to sheer accident. By 'accident' I mean that they are the result of a certain confluence of circumstances that contrive to have even the painter contemplate his finished work and wonder how it came about.

I choose a painting by Velazquez to lend credence to this thesis. Las Meninas is among the most gazed at patches of canvas ever stretched and primed. I say patches advisedly because its large size necessitated the stitching together of lengths of canvas off the roll.

But the painting we now see is not the one the canvas was prepared for. Velazquez had been required to paint a large royal tableau showing the Infanta Margarita Teresa, then aged five, as an object of adoration in the Spanish Court. The following facts give the reason.

  1. In 1656 there was still no male heir to the throne of Spain, though Spanish law allowed the succession of daughters.
  2. Negotiations were going on for the betrothal of the eldest daughter, Maria Theresa, to Louis XIV of France in order to end hostilities between the two countries. They actually married in 1660 after a Spanish condition was agreed that no heir to the French throne could also inherit that of Spain.
  3. Margarita Theresa then became Felipe IV's main concern regarding success and he thought to find her a prospective consort among the Hapsburgs of Austria. It was for this reason that the painting was mandated – as an advertisement for visiting dignitaries.
  4. This painting was completed in 1656 but just a year later it was made redundant by the birth of a son and heir, Felipe Prospero. The worries over success were eased and little Margarita Theresa, instead of being a queen in waiting became just another mouth to feed.

The details of this first painting were not discarded until the mid 1990's when 'Las Meninas' was Xrayed. Underneath where Velazquez now studies us from behind his easel was found to be another figure of a young man approaching the Infanta with an offering on a silver tray. It was also found that the present canvas is smaller than the original, a piece having been cut away from the left of the canvas. What were the circumstances that could have brought this about?

Velazquez died in 1660 aged 61, just four years after finishing the first painting. At the start of his final decade he had traveled to Italy (1649-1651) and while there he painted the portrait of Pope Innocent X, he said to be the finest portrait ever painted (it was said that the Pope himself complained that it was' too truthful '). Velazquez had not traveled alone, but as part of a diplomatic mission to the Vatican. On his return he concentrated his efforts on getting himself elevated to the Order of the Knights of Santiago, a long-cherished desire. His problem was that the Order was not open to humble artists, like painters, one had to prove a connection to the higher echelons of society. Whether he managed this or not it seems that he finally achieved his honor in 1659, the year before he died. In the painting known as Las Meninas he is seen wearing the emblem of the Order on the breast of his tunic. So, sometime between 1657 and 1659 the original painting of the Infanta being attended by maids became the present version that has intrigued viewers ever since.

So it came about that in 1657 the poor little painted princess, suddenly confronted by the facts of life, found herself unceremoniously shoved aside and left to gather dust in an anteroom of the Alcazar Palace while the Court delimited in the prospects of the real prince. But resurrection was at hand!

When her adored little brother was but two years old, the nice old man who had painted her picture, Señor Rodriguez, was delimited to have confirmed his elevation to the higher ranks of Spanish society. Hereforth he would be addressed as Don Diego Rodriguez de Silva y Velazquez, Knight of the Order of the Cross of Santiago, later to be known in the wider world simply as Velazquez.

With the warm pride of attainment swelling in his heart, Don Diego felt compelled to commemorate his achievement by painting a masterpiece. The story of his life, no less, in one triumphant painting. This would be under-standable for any man who had come so far but for a Spanish lad born into the streets of Seville, where, even as an infant, he would prod a sleeping dog with his foot to show he was not afraid, it was a duty that could not be neglected. No commemorative record of a royal coronation could have been more worthy of its art. Of course, the painting had to show that he had been an important person within the Royal Court for most of his life, not just as a painter but in other positions of responsibility as well.

And, as it happened, there was that redundant picture with the sweet little princess, already a finished composition. All he had to do was to paint himself into it somehow. On looking at the huge canvas again, however, he saw that the little girl stood foursquare on the vertical center line of the composition, her sweet face absolutely dominating all around.

Well, he could not have this when it was his own figure that had to form the most important aspect of the composition. What to do about it? Simple. Cut a slice off the left of the canvas so that the fair creature was moved away from the center and further over to the left. But then the proportion of the canvas was all wrong, so to preserve the original proportions a slice had to be cut from the bottom as well, and this would have the added benefit of dropping, not just the creativity herself, but the whole group further away from the center, vertically. A composition began to form in his mind. He would paint himself actually in the act of painting! Not the figures in the composition of course, but who was it who was looking at them. It was something that had never been done before.

Don Diego got to work quickly and within days he had finished his painting. As he worked away fresh ideas came into his mind. His painting would not only be about his own aggrandisement, it would also honor the very name Velazquez, a name that he'd inherited from his mother's forbears. He would put his parents in the composition and a cousin who bore the same name and who also held an important post in the royal court, that of master of the royal fabrics.

He would replace one of the pictures on the back wall with a small mirror in which he would depict the king and queen, as though it were they he was painting. But in the distant mirror they would appear small and insignificant, only there to add grandeur to his design.

He'd seen this trick rolled off in a small painting by Jan van Eyck, a Dutchman. It was called 'The Arnolfini Portrait' and had been painted two hundred years before, in Bruges, Holland, but it now hung in another room of the very palace where he was giving form to his own masterpiece. (It now hangs in the National Gallery in London).

Like in the Dutch master's painting he would also add a dog. A dog symbolized loyalty, so he added a big one. And a mischievous rascal from Seville to prod its hide with his boot. And, with his own mischievous irony, it would be with this painted dog that he would show off all his skill as a painter.

Don Diego was a proud man when he started the painting and when he looked at the finished work he was well satisfied. This one masterpiece of concept and execution could stand alone in place of all the other masterpieces he had ever painted. And what deferred him even more was that it had come about as the result of an accident of fortune – the birth of a little boy at just the right time. He was never to know that the little boy lived him by just fifteen months.

To stand in front of this painting in the Prado in Madrid is to experience the feeling, unusual in an art gallery, of being gazed at from the wall. You'll notice that only two figures are looking squarely at you, Velazquez himself and Mari Barbola, the hydroencephalitic lady behind the dog. The little Queen-in-waiting is watching you watching her.

It's best to see this painting with a partner and then you'll see yourself reflected in the mirror.

Tips on Coloring With Copic Markers

Copic marks are used for drawing anime, fashion design and for cartoon illustrations. Copics are also used for arts and crafts to color stamps. They are intended for professional use with surroundings in mind. They are refillable with disposable nibs. Each of them is dual ended, so artists can select amongst two changed styles of…

Copic marks are used for drawing anime, fashion design and for cartoon illustrations. Copics are also used for arts and crafts to color stamps. They are intended for professional use with surroundings in mind. They are refillable with disposable nibs. Each of them is dual ended, so artists can select amongst two changed styles of nib while working on their projects.

Copic marks work best on paper, wood and leather, but they can also be used on metal, fabrics and other surfaces. They will lose color over time, especially if exposed to severe conditions like UV rays from extended direct sunlight or vivid synthetic lights. There are more than 200 colors available right now in market for these marks. Artists, whether amateur or professional, can decide from a variety of these colors to draw and sketch whatever they want on any surface.

How to Use:

1. Select colors of same color family while blending, like a light or dark blue. Always start with lightest color as the foundation, and include layers of darker color.

2. Every single of them is made with a letter as code. This code explains its color family. For instance, codes that start with a “B” belong to family of blue color.

3. If you planned to use colored pencils to put in detail to an image, apply them as last layer. The alcohol-based ink can not soak up into paper over the pencil layer.

4. Copic marks have a 2-digit code that symbolizes saturation. The first digit symbolizes vibrancy and other one signifies lightness. Lower the number is, lower will be color and vice versa.

5. Check cap of Copic marker to find out its color name along with its code. This will be helpful at time you are going to refill it.

6. Mixing two or more colors with these allows the artist to shade, blend and create professional, smooth-looking work.

How to Refill:

1. Refill its ink by removing cap from broad end and take off ink refill.

2. The ink refill has a plastic pipe which drops one drop of ink out at a time.

3. Bend pointer at an angle of 45-degree to let ink refill to drop ink on to the big nib.

4. Doing this, ink will run back with nib into marker. Put as many drops as you feel at ease in it. Dont forget to cover the nib area.

Abstract Art: What Is It And How To Recognize It?

Some people still (wrongly!) Accuse art of being a boring subject but even they will realize just how wrong they are when they stumble upon a work of art they're eager to discuss. That is what art does to people – it amuses and engages our minds. There's no escaping it. And abstract art is…

Some people still (wrongly!) Accuse art of being a boring subject but even they will realize just how wrong they are when they stumble upon a work of art they're eager to discuss. That is what art does to people – it amuses and engages our minds. There's no escaping it. And abstract art is the most engaging of them all. Why? Because it makes you finish it in your head, for starters. And it makes you wonder … But let's get back to basics.

The basic idea

What is abstract art really? How can it be defined?

How to explain the term to someone who has never heard of it?

If you look it up in a dictionary, something like this might come up:

Abstract art (noun):

Art that makes no attempt to depict external, recognizable reality but aims to represent artist's inner world by using different forms, shapes and colors.

OK, that makes the whole thing a bit clearer, and anyone would be able to recognize an abstract painting based on that nice, short explanation from a dictionary, but there's still more to learn about the topic now that the basic human curiosity is scratched. One question inevitably comes to mind: whothough thought of it first? The idea of ​​pouring whatever in your artistic soul onto the canvass seems so free and liberating and rebellious and easy at the same time that it must be nothing less than a stroke of a genius.

The rest is history

If we are to talk about the immediate origins of contemporary abstract art, we'll search no further than the 19th century. That is the point in time when three significant movements – Romanticism, Expressionism and Impressionism sort of merged together and created the potent sublimation of all their most liberal features, thereby qualifying for future parents to the abstract art that was to be born a little bit later . Among the important representatives of those three movements, the names (and works!) Of Paul Cezanne, Paul Gauguin, Vincent Van Gogh, Edward Munch and Wassily Kandinsky certainly sound familiar to most people now now, almost two centuries later. At the beginning of the 20th century, Henry Matisse, George Braque and other young artists made a real revolution with their bold experiences and the critiques of the time called it Fauvism. At the same time, Pablo Picasso was playing with cubic elements and shapes on his canvas and when George Braque joined him that was enough for a new art label – Cubism. Back then, it was all Futurism when you come to think of it now. Russia had its Constructivists and Germany had the famous Bauhaus back in those days, Kandinsky and Klee were teachers there. But sometimes in the thirties, majority of these artists ended up in Paris and that is where the cradle of abstract art was rocked most intensely.

Still going strong

And nowadays, abstract art is everywhere. You see it on the walls of tall city buildings, in the variety of digital options for personalizing your profile on any social network or blog, it's on your clothes and fashion accessories. If you like it, you can hang it on your wall or you can have the wall wall painted in your favorite abstract motif. Every pattern can be incorporated into the abstract artwork. Just like long, long time ago, when our ancestors drew shapes on the walls of their caves, trying to articulate a prayer for the sun to come or the rain to fall or the hunt to bring enough meat for every member of the tribe. Abstract art is with human race since the very beginnings and its power still resonates within us. You feel it every time you find yourself standing in front of a painting that is communicating with you despite you might not be quite able to put it into words.

Introduction of Oil Painting The Joy of Life

The Joy Of Life was painted by Matisse between 1905 and 1906. It measured 174 * 238 cm, which was collected in Merino Barnes Foundation in Pennsylvania, USA. The Joy Of Life was the most important work in Matisse's long art career. This painting was able to show the characteristics of Fauvism than his other…

The Joy Of Life was painted by Matisse between 1905 and 1906. It measured 174 * 238 cm, which was collected in Merino Barnes Foundation in Pennsylvania, USA. The Joy Of Life was the most important work in Matisse's long art career. This painting was able to show the characteristics of Fauvism than his other works. The flat colors, sinuous lines as well as those original body shapes showed the higher impact of Gauguin. Even the theme-the life state of people in nature also reminded people of Gauguin's yearning for the ideal life in Tahiti Island. In fact, this painting was directly from Matisse's life near the Spanish border Currie Oijer fishing village in the summer of 1905. It was lingering in Europeans' mind for many centuries and had close relationship with the mysterious paradise-Al Katia that got rid of the ugly and troubles.

In this painting, Matisse described the empty field near Currie Orer forest. The distant view of the painting was the blue sea, close-range beach and grass, dotted with various postures and dynamic human body. The figures in the painting made people remember of the figures in Greek works and Paris people's listless attitude in Seurat's Sunday in Diwan Island . This painting seemed to be made by sketch, but it actually implied the painter's substantial understanding of the European ancient traditional motif. Images in this painting were reminiscent of a long list of the banquet scenes of Barkis's carnival under the European painters in-Benigni, Titian, Rubens Poussin, and then to Watteau and Ingres.

The innovative nature of this painting was the highly simplified image. This painting was full of lyric, reflecting the expressionism of Matisse's paintings. Matisse once said, “For me, the most important is the manifestation.” And the so-called performance, he explained, “The performance, in my opinion, is not composed of people's facial expression, not the reflected passion through a strong dynamic motion. images, their blank and the proportion all around them all play a role. “The so-called composition is the art that arranges various factors to express the emotion and decorative ways with rich meaning.” Here, Henri Matisse actually wanted to organize a cheerful emotion painting through the color, line and form. For him, those elements bought him endless pleasure. He wished to bring the pleasant fresh feeling to convey to the audience.

What to Name Your Paintings

One thing that artists like to do is to name their best drawings and paintings. In a way this helps them psychologically take ownership in their work, and it is also a sense of pride, a calling out internally to the external world; look at what I created. In the process of naming a recently…

One thing that artists like to do is to name their best drawings and paintings. In a way this helps them psychologically take ownership in their work, and it is also a sense of pride, a calling out internally to the external world; look at what I created. In the process of naming a recently created work the artist is saying to themselves, this is good, it's worthy and it bought to have a name. They are proud of what they have done, and generally speaking if they name it, and believe it to be that level of quality, it usually is. After all, the artist is always their own harshest critic.

Now then, recently, I spoke to a very talented artist who had done a pretty good charcoal sketch of a male sitting in a chair in a pair of running shorts with their over worked feet and legs resting on a lower cross support piece of the chair . The artist named the sketch;

“The Runner”

She told me that you can tell a lot about a person by their feet. You can learn about their health, how they take care of themselves, and even their way of life. I thought about that, and I also agreed. Interestingly enough, I am also a runner from years gone back, a pretty good one actually. I looked at the painting of the runner's legs and feet and thought to myself; “I like that sketch very much, and I like the name she gave it also.”

Why? Well, because, I can tell you that after running the mile run back in college, that my spikes caused so much friction that my feet felt like they were on fire. There is something funny about that because during the race you can not feel the pain, as all the muscles in your entire body burn with pain, but once you stop, you feel that intense burning in your feet.

That's why if you watch a track and field match featuring the 800M, 1500M, 3000M – the first thing the athletes do is lie on the ground and rip their shoes off. Most people do not know that or probably do not care – but it's like torturing your feet after running a half or full marathon, you just want to get those damn shoes off and sit down – seriously!

Yes, I remember all that, so her sketch grabbed my memories of the pain, exhilaration of winning, and the need to relax after the event, just sit there and let your feet slowly rid themselves of the excruciating pain. So, her name for that sketch is absolutely spot on! When a mere sketch can bring back those emotions, it's obviously good enough to name. Think on this.

Renoir – The Impressionist Who Loved Life

“Why should not art be pretty?” ask Renoir, stalwart of Impressionism. “There are enough unpleasing things in the world.” True to his words Pierre Auguste Renoir painted beautiful canvases that came alive with flowers, people, lush landscapes, and nudes so sensual, he felt he could pin them. His delight in life of the Parisian street…

“Why should not art be pretty?” ask Renoir, stalwart of Impressionism. “There are enough unpleasing things in the world.”

True to his words Pierre Auguste Renoir painted beautiful canvases that came alive with flowers, people, lush landscapes, and nudes so sensual, he felt he could pin them. His delight in life of the Parisian street corner was intense. So much that he side-stepped academic studio practices of the nineteenth century to paint everyday scenes. When his exasperated art master remarked “No doubt you took up painting just to amuse yourself”, Renoir cheekily replied, “If it did not amuse me I would not be doing it.”

Born to needle-pusher parents at Limoges France in 1841, Renoir was noted as the child with the beautiful voice. But even at an early age he was clear that a musical career was 'not his thing'. When his family moved to a house in the courtyard of Louvre in Paris, it bought him in close proximity with the Old Masters of art. Renoir's first job was at a porcelain factory painting silhouettes of Marie-Antoinette on fine white cups. Accomplished at the job, he earned a comfortable income. However, his job was made obsolete by the introduction of a mechanical printing process.

Aged twenty-one years, Renoir now joined a well-known art school run by Charles Gleyre. Traditional in character, the studio provided the artist excellent training in painting. But it was in encouraging Renoir to paint outdoors in the forest of Fontainebleau, that the school contributed to developing his unique artistic style. It was also here that Renoir experienced a coalescence of minds with a band of talented young painters – Claude Monet, Frederic Bazille and Alfred Sisley among them.

Painting in the forest of Fontainebleau, Renoir and Monet tried to truthfully capture the light before it changed hues. This required them to paint very fast. So they often did not blend brush strokes. This sowed the seeds for what was to become the revolutionary Impressionist style of painting. Impressionism captures a fleeting glimpse of the subject in brisk strokes of pure color.

For years Renoir struggled as an artist. It was difficult to find agents and patrons who could see beauty in this new form of art. Those were years of financial hardships for the Impressionists. Till he found patrons like Victor Choquet and the Charpentier family, Renoir lived off portrait missions. Meanwhile, artistically he was struggling to reconcile his impressionist techniques and what he had learned from the paintings of old masters. The result of his confusion was a harsh and impersonal style that fell flat.

Before long, Renoir realized his folly and learned to trust his own instincts. He started painting in bright, radiant colors which he had learned to handle with ease during his years as a porcelain painter. In his canvases he celebrated beauty and grace. But in spite of developing his own distinct style, never did he consider himself a revolutionary. He frequently visited museums and studied the old masters. And in fact his style was less harsh than the other impressionists, say Monet. Renoir created paintings bearing with colors, experienced on flowers the same flesh tint he used for his nudes, and his graceful gentle style was well-suited for painting children.

Renoir was a friendly Impressionist. He believed in the inherent goodness of man. The sociable and affectionate artist inspired great loyalty among his friends. Even though he was reserved in displaying his affection, through quiet acts of benevolence, he won over many. He also enjoyed matrimonial bliss with Aline, with which he had several children.

In 1897, a bicycle accident crippled Renoir. But by an exercise of sheer will he continued to paint for several years. In his lifetime he produced delectable masterpieces such as Luncheon of the Boating Party, The Umbrellas, The Swing and The Theater Box. Renoir died in 1919. His paintings now sell for millions of dollars and are exhibited in the most prestigious art museums of the world.

Appreciation to Oil Painting – The Artist’s Studio

People and things appearing in this painting had a certain meaning, which seemed puzzling. But it reflected the painter's democratic thought and realistic artistic direction, which contained Courbet's capitalist social attitude with suspicion and critique. Some people said that his painting was the proud expression and sad memories. In his paintings, he was very pleased…

People and things appearing in this painting had a certain meaning, which seemed puzzling. But it reflected the painter's democratic thought and realistic artistic direction, which contained Courbet's capitalist social attitude with suspicion and critique. Some people said that his painting was the proud expression and sad memories. In his paintings, he was very pleased with himself, giving the painting composition so naïve and warm vitality. It was so sincere and not ridiculous. Some people also said that his superb performance skills saved a very naïve idea. But people had to admit that the composition, harmonious atmosphere and the uniform color were incomparable, the center of the painting was more beautiful.

All the characters in the painting were arranged in a half round and the center was the painter's image. The unified hot and stuffy atmosphere broke the too bright colors that appeared in Courbet's scenery painting. The uniform colors were based on different color brown tones. The massive walls, the rose, blue and brown tone of the infinite soft terms was a masterpiece. The naked human body model was one of Courbet's most successful human bodies, although she was based on the photos. All the volumes were expressed by the light and shadow. And the pink clothes thrown on the floor was a wonderful still life painting. Portraits of friends were taken from Courbet's past works. So, what we saw here was a memory and a real fantasy, which did not show the intention of the realism of Courbet.

Comparing this painting with A Burial at Ornans , we can clearly see the benefits that Courbet got out of the reality of bondage and invested himself in this warmth. The characters were depicted clearly and appeared to be independent, only relying on the strong atmosphere of independence to get the painting of unity. Therefore the comparison of self-contained unity and the elegant feelings were made. The giant painting showed the artist's ability strong custody of complex composition and the painter's realistic modeling and color painting techniques. The image was filled with texture and sense. All this showed that Courbet was a great master of realism. In 1855, Paris hosted the world-famous painting exhibition and the review committee rejected this painting, because this painting owned a socialist nature. Then the artist decided to rent a house next to the world exhibition to show this painting and entitled it “Realism Exhibition” and published “The Realism Manifesto”. Here was the name of Realism art schools from.

Become An Artist’s Model – Get Paid For Getting a Tan – You Wish

Well, having become involved with a local artists group in the Channel Islands Area, I realized that my pre-conceived notions about the lives of artists was totally misguided. Perhaps you too have some false visions as to how the art world works. If so, maybe I can assist you in setting the record straight. First,…

Well, having become involved with a local artists group in the Channel Islands Area, I realized that my pre-conceived notions about the lives of artists was totally misguided. Perhaps you too have some false visions as to how the art world works. If so, maybe I can assist you in setting the record straight. First, there are many types of artists. Some paint landscapes, buildings, and nature, others specialize in people, animals, and life art. Still, others make a living painting cars, airplanes, trains and other such things.

Then there is the versatile artist, one who is so knowledgeable, so talented, and has so much experience, well, hell they can just about paint, sketch, draw, or render just about anything. Trust me when I tell you people are the hardest, especially non-photograph assisted portrait type paintings or life art. Of course, the life artist who paints people needs a subject to sketch or paint, a model if you will. Sure, it could be a family member or friend, but realize this, it's pretty easy to burn through friends when you ask them to sit for four hours while you create that master piece.

Oh and speaking of models, that is not easy either. In fact, some models who do photography think that they can also do life art modeling – no, doubtful. With life art you have to hold your pose for longer periods of time, not just seconds for the camera's shutter speed, that's easy, and you can do it quite well with some practice and a talented photographer burning through 100s of digital pictures over a 4 -5 minute time period.

Now then, imagine a life art model becoming the muse for the painting artist. Yes, a very important component, but holding a pose for 15-minutes at a time (minimum) up to 30 minutes to an hour is not easy, and getting back into position eight times over the course of half a day, and still sometimes being needed for subsequent hours another day – ouch, sore muscles too, depending on the pose. So, if you think you are going to get paid to model for an artist and get a free tan in the process, well, more like a sunburn I say, so be careful what you wannabe artist's models wish for.

Artists may believe that models have the easy job, just sitting, standing, or lying around for the pose – not. Meanwhile, models think the artists have all the fun, creating and enjoying their work while they slide away with aching muscles trying to hold the pose. The reality is, creating masterpieces is not easy, and the grass is not greener on either side, well, not usually. But in the process, that is how great work is created – and it takes a team to make that happen – it's no walk on the beach, trust me.

How to Break Out of a Creative Rut

One of my artist friends asked me what do I personally do when I find myself stuck in a creative rut. I was in one of those periods recently. Not the first time and it will not be the last either. Every artist gets into a creative rut at times. The good news is that…

One of my artist friends asked me what do I personally do when I find myself stuck in a creative rut. I was in one of those periods recently. Not the first time and it will not be the last either. Every artist gets into a creative rut at times. The good news is that these ruts are necessary. They are a call to up your game.

The artist's rut ​​has many causes. Perhaps the most common are: Doing the same technique over and over expecting a different result; painting the same subject without intent; failing to study your art; not painting regularly; painting too much; other physical or emotional problems causing weariness or distraction; not changing your environment or references; Professional bondage to one style or subject is creative death or an art problem that can not be resolved. There are others.

You may recognize the feeling of being in a rut when you approach painting without that old fizz. That state of happiness that starts quietly and builds up to being blissfully in the moment. Time stands still and you are doing the work. When these qualities are missing it can be depressed. Are you losing your touch? Have you reached the bottom of your talent quota? No you are fine. You are just ready for the next step up.

The problems listed above vary in seriousness. The typical issues for me are related to subject and technique. Sounds mundane enough. Just change them and you are okay. Not so quick. Getting to this point of recognizing the problem, resolving to change something and acting upon it is not simple. It takes energy and discipline. You have to give yourself the proverbial kick in the pants. Make you bargains with the painting gods and get your energy flowing.

Here are a few techniques that help.

Get outside and take a walk. If this is possible for you then make it good. Walk with purpose and vigor. See your surroundings like an artist. Look for shapes, values. Breathe in deeply. Breathe out the frustrations.

If you can not take a walk then any form of exercise that raises your breathing and heart rate will have good effect. Energy flows from action.

If you have an idea then go with it. Draw it out in simple form. Then put it aside. Let it develop in your mind for a while.

While the energy is starting to kick in I like to stoke the fire a bit more by going through preparations. Hands on tasks like preparing painting panels. Cutting canvas. Priming. I line up the panels and will prime ten or more. Get out a canvas and tone it. I am not going to start a painting at this point even if I am tempted to. I tell myself the best is still to come. The breakthrough moment will be tomorrow, but I will be prepared.

Come the morning and I am painting with purpose. Music on. Big brush. Big shapes. Once that canvas has the blocking in completed I start another and block it in too. This is all about action and bold movement. I do not want to get stuck on middle and end stages. I know I will be ready for those later in the day or the next day.

On the issue of subject and technique. Change something. Just do it and go with it. If you have been painting landscapes then paint a portrait. Use big brushes and paint in broad planes to sculpt the face. Loose and free. Those same broad strokes will be used in your next landscape.

Change colors. Paint an entire painting using tones of burnt sienna for example. If I like what I see I may add more color over the monotone and the painting will go in another direction.

I am out of the rut and it has made me stronger. That is what ruts are good for. The most important point is always to get moving. Hustle yourself along. If you sit in one spot you stay at the bottom of the rut. Do the work.