How Can You Create Art When You Are Busy and Short of Time?

Do you feel all stressed-up and feel that your life is not your own? Are you overloaded at work? Are your children giving you little spare time? Is your social life so full you can not spare time for a hobby? You know how it is … You find yourself in a situation where you…

Do you feel all stressed-up and feel that your life is not your own?

  • Are you overloaded at work?
  • Are your children giving you little spare time?
  • Is your social life so full you can not spare time for a hobby?

You know how it is …

You find yourself in a situation where you feel like you do not have a minute to take breath let alone think about doing something to take you mind of the drudgery of your working day.

What you need is to find something that is interesting to do …

  1. Something that makes you feel you are achieving your full potential
  2. Something that fulfills your need to be creative
  3. Something that makes you feel good about yourself

Spare-time for most people in the hurly-burly of the modern world is extremely limited. For many of us the work we do has to be the main priority. It makes obvious sense to earn enough money to keep a roof over the heads of our family and provide food for the table.

Yet, the skilled depended upon for our living is often extremely boring. Many jobs involve repetitive tasks that make you feel little more than a human machine – A robot. Often it is only the people who share our work days that make it seem acceptable. It is the camaraderie that makes it worthwhile, sharing jokes and laughter together.

So … Is that all there is?

Even if our full-time occupation is satisfying, such as bringing up children and looking after the family undetectedly is, there is a part of us that feels unfulfilled.

There are creative urges that have to be set aside.

If you have always wanted to be an artist but find your time restricted, is it completely out of the question to learn how to paint and draw?

Does it really mean that your artistic aspirations are beyond reach?

Or is there a way to learn the basics and be able to produce simple but stunningly paintings in a very short time?

Is there a way to learn the fundamentals of drawing that allow you to gain confidence in your creative design abilities?

Well, if nothing more, depending upon your attitude towards finding extra hours to start what is a rewarding hobby at the very least, you could find great benefits.

If, however, you have only a few minutes on rare occasions you can still enjoy some success. The answer is simple … “Keep it simple!”

What does this mean for you?

When time is short there is no benefit in expecting to create huge masterpiece from scratch with no experience.

Instead, if you do small simple things often …

In time you can build complicated and ambitious painting projects by taking small but regular stages.

If you never forget the fact that it took one of the greatest artists of all time, Leonardo da Vinci, years to create his masterpiece the Mona Lisa, it should encourage you to continue.

For those who can only find around 10 to 20 minutes a day to learn how to draw and paint take a look at the simple and easy way to learn how to paint watercolors link below. It has been designed and produced for someone creative like you to get the best fast from your talents.

And, if you have more time to spare the wonders of the art world is open to you …

Fascination at the National Museum Eugene Delacroix

Once immersing oneself within Parisian culture, it is only right to examine some of the geniuses who have put the city on the artistic map. One of these greats is Eugene Delacroix, a fascinating man who was once described by Baudelaire as “a volcanic crater artistically disguised beneath bouquets of flowers”, who epitomized the French…

Once immersing oneself within Parisian culture, it is only right to examine some of the geniuses who have put the city on the artistic map. One of these greats is Eugene Delacroix, a fascinating man who was once described by Baudelaire as “a volcanic crater artistically disguised beneath bouquets of flowers”, who epitomized the French aesthetic of romanticism becoming a leader in this artistic movement. Visitors looking for different attractions in Paris can find out more about his work, as well as the individual himself, by going to the Musee National Eugene Delacroix. The artist was born just before the turn of the 19th century. He was a painter and notable intellectual. He is famous for his impressive brushstrokes and extremely detailed examination of the visual effects of color, and is believed to have directly influenced the impressionist movement. He was a fine lithographer and neoclassical perfectionist and was there before, called upon to illustrate several possible works during his life. This included pieces by William Shakespeare, the writer Walter Scott and German author Johann Wolfgang von Goethe.

His works were typified by an emphasis on movement and color rather than clarity of outline, focusing on dramatic and romantic content. Unlike many of his contemporaries, Delacroix did not lean towards painting classical models of Roman and Greek art. Instead, his search for the exotic led him to North Africa.

While he was best known as a romantic painter, Delacroix did not give in to sentimentality and carried on creating very individual pieces using his determined and unique style.

The Musee National Delacroix

Situated in an enchanting square on the Left Bank, the Musee National Delacroix is ​​hosted in the painter's last apartment, which he moved to in 1857 so that he could be near to the Eglise St Sulpice. The museum houses much of his early work, including small pastels, sketches and lithographs, as well as much of Delacroix's personal belongings.

Inside, visitors will find memorabilia from his trips abroad and letters between himself and other artists of his time. While walking through the building, people can admire the painter's life through his brilliant work and, despite only owning the man for his final six years, it is great in history. The site, which includes his garden, became a national museum in 1971 and exhibits pictures from almost every phase of Eugene Delacroix's career. These include the artist's three attempts at frescos, as well as drawings and primary studies for paintings in the Chapelle des Saint Agnes at the Eglise Saint Sulpice.

Visitors will also find drawings by some of Delacroix's esteemed friends and collections, with Huet, Poterlet, Lassalle-Bordes, Saint-Marcel and Colin all featuring in the museum.

In relation to his with North African influences, there are many notes, souvenirs and sketches from his Morocco trip in 1832, with cushions, ceramics, jewelery, kaftans and footwear on display.

As the museum was once his workspace studio, items such as easels, palettes, candlesticks and other aids are also set out as the artist had left them, allowing visitors to really immerse themselves in the painter's life and works.

How to Prepare Your Palette for Oil Painting

In oil painting palette has two meanings. The first refer to the surface on which your paint is mixed; the second meaning is the array of colors employed for painting. Most artists prefer a wood palette. Some use a thick piece of glass placed atop a sheet of gray paper. But a glass palette is…

In oil painting palette has two meanings. The first refer to the surface on which your paint is mixed; the second meaning is the array of colors employed for painting.

Most artists prefer a wood palette. Some use a thick piece of glass placed atop a sheet of gray paper. But a glass palette is restricted to studio use and working from a taboret, which is a small table that holds the bulk of your painting gear.

My preference is for the wood palette. Wood palettes come in a variety of shapes and sizes; the most popular is the oval shape that is designed to fit in the crook of your elbow and is gripped with your thumb through the hole in the palette. The wood palette can be either a small, dinner-plate size or a large platter. As a teacher I recommend that beginners use the smaller size palette.

Before the palette can be used for painting it needs to be prepared with a sealant. Unsealed palettes will leach the delicate oils from your paint and rob them of their lustre.

There are three different methods for preparing a palette for painting. One can lightly apply a few coats of shellac letting each coat dry thoroughly before the next. Some artists who have invested in an expensive, counter-weighted palette will painstakingly seal it with a French polish giving it the look of a fine antique. There is, however, a serious drawback to these two preparations: the warm, umber hues of varnish make it difficult to accurately gauge color mixing.

The better method is this: invest in a liter of linseed oil. It should not be artist grade. Raw linseed oil that is available in hardware stores suffices well.

Pour a couple of tablespoons of linseed oil onto your palette and with a clean cloth rag evenly spread the oil over your palette. Let the oil sink in for about an hour then repeat six to eight times. To keep your palette from warping it is not a bad idea to work both sides evenly.

The goal is to saturate the wood with oil. Once fully arranged set your palette aside and allow it to air dry for several days. Even after a week, however, your palette will still feel oily. This is a good sign. It means your palette is ready to begin its journey.

Even though your palette is now fully laden with oil it will still leach the delicate emollients from your paint. But only for a little while.

At the conclusion of every painting day you should clean your palette. NEVER, EVER use turpentine to mop up your paintings. Turpentine is a solvent and it will strip your palette like a thief run amok in a foreclosed housing development.

Instead scrape your paint off with a painting knife and rub the reminder into your palette with a cloth. In a short time a soft, wax-like surface will develop that will literally love your oil paint. This waxy surface also acquires a neutral gray color that enables you to accurately mix and gauge your color's hue, tone and temperature.

Your painting palette is an indispensable tool and like your brushes should be well care of.

The Influence of Native American Art on the Works of Jackson Pollock

Paul Jackson Pollock (1912-1956) was a well-known American artist who was influential in abstract and expressionist art. Although his short personal life, wrought with alcoholism and perplexity bipolar disorder, was arduous, his particular painting techniques, deemed to be drawn from Native American art, appeared effortless. Many critics agree that Pollock was unmistakably one of the…

Paul Jackson Pollock (1912-1956) was a well-known American artist who was influential in abstract and expressionist art. Although his short personal life, wrought with alcoholism and perplexity bipolar disorder, was arduous, his particular painting techniques, deemed to be drawn from Native American art, appeared effortless. Many critics agree that Pollock was unmistakably one of the greatest artists of the 20th century. To this day, his enigmatic work continues to be accredited, studied, and analyzed by art students, critics, and enthusiasts.

Art Education

Pollock received a rather traditional art education at the Manual Arts High school in Los Angeles and later at the Art Students League in New York, with his brother, under the direction of Thomas Hart Benton. However, he soon strayed from the conventional and delved into his own unique forms of artistic expression. Having grown up in Arizona, Pollock had an intrinsic understanding of Native American art and culture that would prove to be career-altering exposure for this young artist.

Art Techniques and Media

During the 1940s, Jackson Pollock's techniques changed dramatically after he witnessed Native American Indian sand painting demonstrations at the Museum of Modern Art. Learning that Indian medicine men sprinkled colorful sands onto surfaces in a seemingly random and somewhat trance-like way, Pollock began to form a similar technique which he would later refer to as the “dripping method.”

Pollock's process consulted of pouring, flinging, and dripping paint onto a canvas on the ground while simultaneously circling the piece in a dance-like movement. The dance was never complete until the painting had revealed itself, at which point the artist would stop abruptly and announce that the masterpiece was finished. Because of his non-conventional techniques, Pollock came to be known as “Jack the Dripper.”

Jackson Pollock's media were about as varied as his methods. Trading in traditional paint brushes for all sorts of household items such as utensils and even sticks, Pollock experimented with the effects of each tool. He often found himself on the floor with his work, a position he came to prefer as he believed it fostered a certain intimacy between art and artist.

Native American Influences

Although Pollock never admitted an intentional imitation or following of Native American art, he did concede that any similarities were probably a result of his “early memories and enthusiasms.” Without doubt, similarities do exist. In addition to the methodology he adapted from the Indian medicine men of the West, Pollock expressed an interest in primitive subject matter akin to much of what is seen in traditional Native American art (ie birth, life cycles, nature, and animals). This symbolism is perhaps most conspicuous in his 1943 painting entitled 'Guardians of the Secret'.

Although 'Guardians of the Secret' is clearly abstract, as all of Pollock's paintings are to some extent, some representational images in the composition are worthy of mention. These images appear to be two large guards, resembling totem poles, standing on opposite sides of a rectangular image which seems to be a painting within the painting. Some critics have suggested that this centerpiece is in fact “the secret” in question. Art analyzes have also drawn the connection between this work of art and Pollock's Native American influences since Indian sand paintings were often considered sacred and guarded in much the same way as the inner-painting in the 'Guardians of the Secret' is protected. The interpretation would suggest that the secret in the painting was Pollock's artistic techniques embodied in the inner painting, but this may be an oversimplification of the message Pollock was trying to convey. Perhaps the inner painting-an overwhelmingly abstract piece with only one visible representational scheme appearing as a hieroglyph or code of sorts-points to something much more than Pollock's artistic methods. If indeed Pollock intended that the image resemble an Indian sand-painting, then he unduly meant for the message to be a profound one.

Art critics will most likely continue to speculate as to the true meaning behind 'Guardians of the Secret'. Since Jackson Pollock himself deferred to the painting, not the artist, as the controlling force behind the art, it could be that not even he knew the message that is guarded so intentionally. If the artist did know the secret, it was unfortunately buried with him in 1956 when he succumbed to his alcoholism in a one-car accident at the young age of 44.

Beautify Your Room With Quality Landscape Paintings

Want to lighten up the mood in your room? Or you simply aim to create a different ambiance to your personal space? One ideal way to do this is to decorate your home with beautiful and stylish landscape paintings. Unless you're an experienced art collector and you're already used to buying paintings, here's a short…

Want to lighten up the mood in your room? Or you simply aim to create a different ambiance to your personal space? One ideal way to do this is to decorate your home with beautiful and stylish landscape paintings. Unless you're an experienced art collector and you're already used to buying paintings, here's a short guide on some tips to consider when buying art works.

Price range

Expect to spend at least $ 50 on the prints alone. These $ 50-priced items are typically just posters. Framed artworks are usually more expensive, some costing up to $ 500. The price of the art piece will also be dependent on the materials used. For instance, there are varying prices depending on the type of frame and medium you choose, as well as the type and size of the paper and the matt boards.

Apart from the usual galleries in the area, the internet is also a vast place to consider searching for quality art prints and works. There are lots of options you can check out online, and you can even find quality works at around $ 100 or less. Of course, if you want to go for popular art pieces created by known artists, expect to pay more than $ 500 for the art work.

Art work medium

Like what's said earlier, you can choose a variety of media for your art work pieces. However, remember that each option is priced differently. If you're only after room decors, it's more ideal and practical to spend money on framed art prints than collecting more expensive original art works. Aside from this, you also need to be quite knowledgeable in art if you want to collect original works. This is to avoid fraud and those art dealers who sell fake art pieces.

Source

Instead of checking out every museum or gallery around your area, the internet is a safe bet to check out a wide assortment of printed copies of different landscape paintings. Unless you are an art collector who's really after the original paintings, you can always go for art prints of your selected paintings. You can search for websites that sell prints and browse their pages depending on the subject of your choice, or check out the collections of different galleries and artists from different locations.

Since there's a wide array of art dealers online, you can find your best bet by investing some time searching around. Go for reputable online shops that offer quality art pieces. You can also find sources that offer customization services. Apart from finding the art prints of your choice, you can also select the type and size of medium, frame, and matt boards to use. This way, you can get artwork decors that really suit your specific preferences.

Painting En Plein Air: A Fumbling Trek Into the Wilds of New Zealand

Painting en plein air (in the open air) is one of my greatest pleasures. It gets me out of the studio and into nature and after a short two hour session I am fully reinvigorated and ready to tackle whatever life decides to throw at me that day. I keep a rucksack filled with my…

Painting en plein air (in the open air) is one of my greatest pleasures. It gets me out of the studio and into nature and after a short two hour session I am fully reinvigorated and ready to tackle whatever life decides to throw at me that day. I keep a rucksack filled with my en plein air kit of brushes, oils, palette, etc. by the door so that I can grab a quick mug of coffee and a muffin as I make good my escape.

The first important consideration is to travel light. You obviously can not pack up your entire studio and hump it into the wilds. You would not make it to the end of the block. Just a few brushes, a very limited selection of colors, a half-box French easel (I use a Mabef easel; my beloved Julian half-box had finished a decade of hard travel before irreremeably collapsing in Nice. back to France, its home, before expiration.)

An umbrella is also an indispensable part of the kit. It protects you from the sun and the rain, although, admittedly, sudden gains of wind can wreak havoc on your pleasant sojourn and provide comic relief to onlookers. I use a white golf umbrella with the handle sawn off and affixed to a tent pole that is then tied to my easel with a couple of bungee cords. This set up allows me to stand at my easel.

Painting en plein air requires an economy of means. There is no time for fussing about or finicky details. Once I find my subject and set up my station I compose myself for a few minutes: I want to see the picture before tackling it with limpid and juicy brush strokes.

When searching for my subject I keep an open mind and will sometimes hike for hours before finding a composition that intrigues me. Sometimes the composition finds me. This is what happened with the plein air sketch Lake Thompson, New Zealand .

Te Anau, the town known as the gateway to Milford Sound on the south island of New Zealand, is sustained by deer hunting in the winter and early spring. Most visitors quickly pass through Te Anau on daily excursions to Milford Sound. I was fortunately to have had the opportunity to spend two wintry months in Te Anau.

I was introduced to Tom on my first night there. Here is almost 70 years and still works as a professional guide leading deer hunters deep into the sylvan mountain forests of New Zealand's wild west coast. Here also packs in replenishing provisions. The rule of deer hunting is that if you shoot it you carry it out. A good sized buck will weigh in at about 150 to 200 pounds. That's 200 pounds of limp meat heaved and roped onto your back then transported up and down mountain ravines for several miles to a boat or helicoptor for transport back to Te Anau.

A few weeks after being introduced to Tom he called and invited me to join him on a boating excursion up the middle arm of Lake Te Anau. This would be no tourist excursion but the real deal venturing bravely goes into the depths of New Zealand's wilderness.

Armed only with a pack of crackers, a wedge of cheddar and a couple tins of sardines plus my painting gear stripped down to the bare essentials Tom and I embarked from Te Anau Downs into the cold, fog-shrouded silence of the lake. The outboard motor shuddered and blocked and shut down a few times due to the numb cold. The fourth time the motor quit I began to wish that I had foregone my painting gear and packed more life-sustaining victuals. It would be a very long walk over the mountain back to town.

After two hours of both a mighty and tearful struggle – Tom's might, my tears – with the outboard we gently glided onto a beach. 'Can you smell the deer?' Here asked me. 'Uh no,' I replied. My nostrils were being blocked up by sandflies. These perfidious bastards greeted me by the hundreds. Any opening, any gap in my protective clothing was soon found and exploited by these hard-shelled devils wholly intent on doing evil to my person. 'Sonofabitch,' I fought. Here Smiled: 'You'll get used to them. After a few hundred bites. '

We portaged our pitifully meagre rations and painting gear up, then down, and across a wet and slippery ravine to Lake Hansen. Here had a second boat moored here and this would take us deeper into the wild where we would break for lunch before embarking on our real adventure.

At the end of Lake Hansen is a hunter's cabin. I'm not sure how old it is but it definitely had what I felt to be a 1920's feel to it. We brewed up a pot of Billy Tea (the standard beer fare when tramping about the bush down here) and wolfed down the victuals. Life is good. It is just how I imagined trout fishing in America used to be. Being a man of action, Tom, tore off his jacket and said: 'Time to go. I have a boat up at the next lake that needs to be bought back here for some repairs. You'll want to leave your jacket here, too. It might get pretty warm coming back. '

The last part of what Tom said did not register. I was thinking 'How wonderful – a few hours of painting and then a sentimental journey back lazing upon the gentle rhythms of the creek.'

We strolled down the path toward Lake Thompson. Here mentioned that there was a bridge up ahead that we'll be crossing. Bridge? So what? I did not pay any heed to such ridiculous cautions, I was basking in sunlit vernal bliss.

The bridge was a 3-cabled affair that was accessed by climbing a dubious looking ladder. There was one cable to walk on, like a tightrope performer in a circus, and two thinner cables on which to hold for dear life. Here scampered up the ladder and paused sniffing the air for deer I imagined. He must have done a promising scent because he literally danced over the bridge's cable. He may have even pirouetted a couple of times. I'm not sure. I was dumb stuck how anyone, less a 70 year old, could cross that cable so fast.

Reaching the other side Tom slid down that ladder and fled into the bush. 'Oh crap!' I hastened over the swaying cable with ill-placed, tremulous herring-boned steps struggling to keep both myself and painting gear from hurtling onto the rocks far below.

The hiking path was little more than a fragment of some half-forgotten dream. The deer trails were in better shape and I kept straying off of my intelligence path onto the deer trails. Here was crash through the bush like a commando hell-bent on a suicide mission. Now and then I would catch glimpses of him as I struggled to keep up. Once I ventured too far down a deer trail and felt that I was now lost. Curiously I recalled reading somewhere that when people get lost in the wild they do not perish due to deprivation but to shame. I understand that now.

'Here? Here? ' I claimed out blatantly. No answer. I backtracked down the deer trail. I was done for. I knew it. I now sorely wished that I had saved some crackers for a life-sustaining snack.

Further down the trail I finally spotted Tom impatiently waiting for me. 'You OK?' he asked. 'Sure,' I replied with a manly gasp. 'I just lost the trail for a moment.'

'It gets rough now. We got some boulders ahead of us and it can be slippery. Try not to break your neck. '

For the next mile we clambered over moss-slicked boulders the size of houses. Breaking my neck was the least of my worries – I was more concerned about keeping my dignity intact.

It was mid-morning when we finally descended the boulders onto the muddy beach of Lake Thompson. Here asked me how much time I would need for my 'project'. 'A couple of hours should suffice.' 'Do not dawdle,' Tom said, 'unless you fancy hiking back in the dark. I'll be up there getting the boat. ' He pointed to some obscure spot half-way up a mountain side. I felt it would be imprudent to ask why a boat would be stored on a mountain side. Maybe the lake has biblical floods.

Here disappeared up into the mountain to fetch his boat. I was left alone on the beach with only the sandflies and my paintings to keep me company.

There is a cleansing exhilation to setting up one's easel in a remote spot where very few people have been before. At most six hunters a year will pass through Lake Thompson. Remnants of early morning mist still hung over the lake and the sun was breaking through the cloud cover. The painting went well. It practically painted itself well within my allotted time of two hours.

Here returned down the mountain carrying a 10 foot aluminum row boat on his shoulders. With his arms outstretched and gripping the gunwales to steady the boat I was at first perplexed as to whether I was looking at a comical Christ-like jaunt down the rocky steps of Golgotha ​​or a madman. Neverheless, I looked forward to setting the boat into the lake and floating back to Lake Hansen. 'The creek is pretty choked up this time of year so we'll have to carry the boat back,' Tom said.

Before the ashes of my dashed hopes had settled onto the beach Tom headed back onto the boulders and with the boat houted on his shoulders began our painful return journey. My only thought was' the horror! the horror! ' This was insane. The general nomenclature of hiking rates trains from 1 for beginners (ie, a stroll to the local 7-11 for a slurpee) to 10 for advanced difficulty (a three to five day hike over very rough terrain. of roots and bugs for maintaining one's life). I do not think there is a rating for hauling a row boat over a trail that would break the spirit of a commando.

For the next three hours we pushed, dragged and heaved the boat over boulders the size of duplexes, under brush and logs and when the trail was completely inaccessible just smashed our way through. I was completely bathed and blinded with sweat. ('It might get pretty warm coming back,' I remembered Tom telling me.) My easel, slung over my back, insisted on continuously groping me at frequent and inopportune moments.

An hour into this Dantesque hell I simply accepted that I would be pushing and lifting this damnable boat in perpetuity. The veneer of civilized manners slipped from my being and I reverted deep into my racial unconscious. I had become a beast of burden. Nothing else. Here looked to be wholly engulfed in his singular madness. A man near 70 years, twenty years my senior, and he would have to be my savior were my heart to collapse.

We reached Lake Hansen by late afternoon. With the sun beginning its early descent into mountain darkness there was no time for rest. Here moored his infernal boat high up from the shore line and we embarked immediately back to Lake Te Anau. It would be another two hours or so before I would get home exhausted. But I had bagged my painting.

Not every plein air excursion is a testing adventure, of course. Many times an enchanting composition can be found in your backyard or a nearby park. The main thing is to get out and paint and, yes, it needs to be said, live your life.

The hardest part is breaking the inertia and getting started.

The New Art – “Reborn” Dolls

During the 1990's doll collecting took on new life with the introduction of “reborning”. Reborning started as a method of taking pre-fabricated dolls and making them appear more life like. Since then, reborning has evolved into a new art form. Artists who reborn dolls begin by stripping dolls of all factory paint and hair and…

During the 1990's doll collecting took on new life with the introduction of “reborning”. Reborning started as a method of taking pre-fabricated dolls and making them appear more life like. Since then, reborning has evolved into a new art form.

Artists who reborn dolls begin by stripping dolls of all factory paint and hair and then applying new paint in multiple, ultra thin layers. Hair is then rooted, or micro -oted, using mohair or human hair and felting needles. While it is true some artists use wigs or paint the hair on, most root the hair by hand. Many dolls are then stuffed and weighed to make the doll feel more life like as well.

Reborn dolls became so popular that companies began to emerge that produce doll parts … simply for the purpose of reborning. This is also called “newborning” (since the parts have never actually been assembled into a doll prior to being “reborn”). The techniques used for newborning are the same as reborning … only the stripping part is skipped since the doll parts come in vinyl / silicone free of paint.

Several layers of paint are required to achieve the depth necessary for the look of real skin tone. Each layer is painted and allowed to set, or be heat set, before applying the next layer. If the paint is not set between each layer the paintings will run together and the effect will be lost. Some artists use air dry paints, but most prefer to use heat set oil paints by Genesis. With these paintings you can heat the parts to 260 and then continue to the next layer. If you use traditional oil paints you have to wait several days between each layer. With air dry paints you run the risk of the paint curing before you get it just like you want it. These are the reasons most artists take matters into their own hands and use the heat set oils. Artists usually require at least 7 layers to complete the process, but many take up of 12 or more layers to achieve the look they desire.

Hair rooting is another skill that must be mastered for the baby to look as realistic as possible. Some artists choose to use wigs, but wigs are not natural looking and as such are used rarely by true reborn artists. Rooting is the process of taking mohair or human hair and inserting it into the dolls head using felting needles. This process can sometimes leave the dolls looking “plugged” (like poor barbie). With thick hair this is not really an issue, but to get the thin newborn hair look the hair must be micro-rooted. Micro-rooting is the same basic process, however, the hair isoted one to two strands at a time. This creates a very natural look, but can take days to complete.

With so much skill needed to create a fine collectible baby, you can see why the art of reborning has gained such ground in the art world. Very few people can master all of the elements needed to create a genuinely realistic looking doll. To add to that, many artists have begun sculpting their own dolls from clay to get an even more precise look they are after. Silicone dolls beloved from such molds are in high demand recently. It is easy to see this art form taking yet another pathway in the doll market.

Many dolls come with letters of authenticity which raise the value of said dolls in the collectors market. For instance, an artist can make only a limited number of a certain mold and those dolls quickly become rare and therefore much more valuable than a mass produced kit. Some of the earliest artists to gain recognition for their art, have recently become very valuable and highly sent after. Since reborning is s relatively new “invention”, no one dares to vent a guess at just how valuable some of these can get in time.

Reborns and newborns are no longer just dolls collected through eBay, but a league all their own.

5 Easy Tips on How to Start in Art or Become an Artist

Here are some basic things you need to know about trying to start out as an artist as a hobby or in the art industry. I am just like you, trying to find new hobbies and interests. One of my hobbies are drawing and Art. Here are 5 basic tips on how to start your…

Here are some basic things you need to know about trying to start out as an artist as a hobby or in the art industry. I am just like you, trying to find new hobbies and interests. One of my hobbies are drawing and Art. Here are 5 basic tips on how to start your own art hobby:

Tip 1: Get the Basic Supplies to Start Out! – When wanting to start out, you need all the supplies you need! Get the essentials like a sketchbook, pencils, erasers, paint, marks and etc. Whatever you think you need to use for your area of ​​art. I started with a GIGANTIC sketchbook, erasers, marks, crayons and colored pencils.

Tip 2: Take Some Art Classes or get Drawing books – This is the only way to get better. If you want to like draw specific things, there are a bunch of different books on how to draw like horses, cars, cartoon characters and anything else you can imagine! Or if your not that type of person to teach yourself (Like me), take an art class. I started taking art classes since 6th grade and I loved the fact I got to imagine things and put it on paper! Most art classes have a broad perspective on art. But, each step in these things take time and effort. Try not to rush.

Tip 3: Pick up That Pencil and PRACTICE! – After learning all the things you need to know about drawing from the how-to-draw books or art classes, next step is trying it out see what you learned. Practice makes perfect.

Tip 4: Keep Going – If you like it up to this point, maybe keep going! You have to keep pushing for what you want! Take it further and maybe it could become a career for you! This class would probably help get you better at your drawing and make it become realistic. I'm going to keep taking art in high school because it interests me and its something I enjoy.

Tip 5: Have fun with it and Enjoy – You can not always be serious with your interest! You can also live with playing around with art. Be creative. Your art is what you make it to be! I strive everyday trying to find something new in my interest in art and so can you!

Hope this helps you to make your choice of whether to be in art or not!

How To Improve Your Drawing Skill With This Simple Lesson

All of us are deeply inculcated with symbolic preconceptions. When we begin to draw there is a disconnect between what we see and what we are looking at. This is not just a difference in syntax, it is the result of a system of symbols within our racial subconscious that asserts itself as soon as…

All of us are deeply inculcated with symbolic preconceptions. When we begin to draw there is a disconnect between what we see and what we are looking at. This is not just a difference in syntax, it is the result of a system of symbols within our racial subconscious that asserts itself as soon as a pencil touches paper.

For example: a beginner's portrait drawing exhibits many of the same characteristics as that of children: The eyes are generally elliptical and the head an oval. These are symbols of eyes and the head.

Even a professional artist with many years of experience and training regularly struggles with extricating these symbolic preconceptions from their work. Often an artist will subconsciously invent their own symbols – instead of drawing elliptical eyes that they will tend to draw their own eyes.

An artist's training should begin with learning how to accurately strike the overall shape of an object. But even beginning with a simple object such as a shoe box involves a set of complex actions. First, one needs to gauge how big to draw the box relative to their drawing paper (or canvas). Second, the height to width proportion needs to be accurately established. And, third, the angles of the shoe box must be rendered correctly to convincingly convey spatial dimension.

A beginning artist's initial lessons should be to acquire the skill of accurately assessing and drawing any given rectangle. This will train you to immediately assess any subject's height / width proportion, a critical component to drawing accurately.

The Drawing Lesson

Using a water-soluble black marker, preferably one with a thick nib, approx a large rectangle, 18 x 24 inches will suffice, on a suitable piece of paper. You can also use a toned pre-stretched canvas. Affix this onto a wall about six feet distance and at your eye level.

You will need a piece of plexiglass, about 14 x 11 inches, that is placed over your drawing paper. With your black marker quickly draw that rectangle as accurately as you can adjudge onto the plexiglass without any pre-measuring. This is important; any pre-measuring will defeat the purpose of this lesson.

From your station point (this is where you are standing at your easel) hold up the plexiglass towards the subject rectangle to assess the accuracy of your drawing. You will need to focus your plexiglass so that the top and bottom of both the subject rectangle and your drawing are aligned.

If the widths are matched you have done a commendable job. More likely, however, your drawing will be too wide. Most beginning artists tend to exaggerate the width of their subjects.

Wipe off your plexiglass and repeat the exercise with the knowledge that you likely tend to draw things too wide. This self-corrective strategy is extremely effective in improving your drawing skill.

Once you can accurately inscribe an 18 x 24 inches rectangle push yourself forward and repeat this drawing lesson with a variety of rectangles.

Whether your subject is portrait, landscape or still-life the height / width proportion needs to be immediately established. When drawing a portrait I always begin by indicating the height of the head from crown to chin while simultaneously determining my composition. This single drawing lesson will literally save you years of struggle and significantly propel your art making forward.

Three Underpainting Practices for Oil Painting

The practice of underpainting is almost as large an area of ​​study as oil painting. The purpose of an underpainting is to establish the composition and overall light / dark pattern while initiating the development of volumes and substance to the forms. An underpainting allows you to envision the totality of the pictorial idea. In…

The practice of underpainting is almost as large an area of ​​study as oil painting.

The purpose of an underpainting is to establish the composition and overall light / dark pattern while initiating the development of volumes and substance to the forms.

An underpainting allows you to envision the totality of the pictorial idea. In addition to correcting drawing errors the underpainting's primary purpose is to fix the all important Notan, which is the Japanese term for light / dark harmony.

Generally speaking, there are three types of underpainting: there is the fully worked up monochromatic grisaille. This is the academic approach where little is left to chance. However, the classic grisaille of mixed white and black possesses an Achilles Heel. As the white paint ages it becomes more translucent and the black paint in the gray mix will dominate. Here the overall picture will darken significantly, especially if there was an adequate correction of the grisaille.

If a basic oil / turpentine medium is employed this darkening is all but guaranteed. The solution is to use a thixotropic resin based medium – such as Venice Turpentine – which suspends the pigment and nullifies the oil's interminable darkening. Despite its name Venice Turpentine is a resin not a solvent. A confusing but important distinction.

The Renaissance approach often employed the verdaccio which is a green-hued underpainting. Michelangelo's unfinished Entombment exhibits his painting process from beginning to finish. The central Christ figure is a wholly resolved verdaccio underpainting.

The optical grisaille resolves many of the problems of the gray mixes of the classical grisaille. The imprimatura holds the light middle tones; raw umber and charcoal gray produces the darker values; and concludes with a select impasto of white lead paint that supports the highest values ​​of the overpainting as the oil paint grows more translucent over time.

The final appearance of an optical grisaille is a painting that exhibits a higher key of color than what can be achieved by an academic grisaille or even direct alla prima.

The key for achieving a translucent grisaille is the thixotropic medium of stand oil, Venice turpentine and Damar varnish diluted with turpentine.

In oil painting your medium is to painting what sauces are to French cuisine. The all-too-common medium of linseed oil and turpentine actually degrades the paints robbing them of their lustre. You can buy ready-made painting mediums in the art store, but in my opinion this is like pouring Kraft Thousand Island dressing onto an exquisitely prepared gourmet meal.

The Easel Way To Do It

The word easel literally translates from the original Shildersezel as “painter donkey”. This description is apt considering the donkey was used in days of old to do the heavy lifting and hauling. The Dutch language has the same word with only a one letter difference, German “ezel”, Dutch “esel”. Easels provide a sturdy base from…

The word easel literally translates from the original Shildersezel as “painter donkey”. This description is apt considering the donkey was used in days of old to do the heavy lifting and hauling. The Dutch language has the same word with only a one letter difference, German “ezel”, Dutch “esel”.

Easels provide a sturdy base from which a painter can work it also helps to choose the right one for your style and type of painting. No matter what easel for painting you use it helps to be able to adjust your easel to accommodate different sizes of canvas as well as tilt for certain types of paints.

The construction of the wooden easel is very important. It has to withstand lots of use and some even have to travel with you. Outdoor painter's have to have a light weight, well constructed easel. Hiking up trails to find the best that nature has to offer is hard enough without adding a lot of bulk and weight. The best easel for this job is a tripod easel of aluminum.

There are also those who for whatever reasons like to sit down to work and the table top easel would be the perfect work donkey for them. It can also do double duty as a standing easel. It is small, compact, foldable, and user friendly. Although it is so portable it is not ideally suited for use out of doors.

If you really want a “do it all” wooden easel, you want to find a true French easel. This one has the sketchbox, the easel and the canvas carrier. The design makes it easy to fold when haste is required and it stores you canvas and supplies inside. What makes this easel a favorite is that you only have one thing to carry and that is the bag it comes in.

Finally there is the “big daddy” of them all the studio easel. This is a massive piece of furniture. These are the easels that are built to last and to handle the very large size canvases. These are not portable and as the name implies these are meant to be in the artists studio or work space permanently.

A painter has to choose the right work donkey for their job. Choosing the wrong one could hinder your work and your progress as an artist. Take a bit of time to explore what is on the market. The best qualities in a wooden easel are really what works for you. Shop locally or buy online. Painting would be impractical if you had to hold the canvas yourself, that is why we say “easel does it”.

How to Draw People – A Training Exercise to Hone Your Drawing Skill

Drawing people, or better still, portrait drawing, is an intimate correspondence between artist and subject. With line and tone we map both the physical landscape and character of another human being. This is what makes portrait drawing a deeply satisfying engagement. Beginner artists begin with drawing the eyes and growing the portrait outwards. Others will…

Drawing people, or better still, portrait drawing, is an intimate correspondence between artist and subject. With line and tone we map both the physical landscape and character of another human being. This is what makes portrait drawing a deeply satisfying engagement.

Beginner artists begin with drawing the eyes and growing the portrait outwards. Others will begin with an oval and employ a generic template: the eyes are vertically centred; the nose, likewise, is then centred between the eyes and chin, etc.

To be blunt: this is a recipe for a poor drawing.

The biggest stumbling block in drawing people is our ingrained idea of ​​what people look like. A disconnect occurs when we begin to draw. We see an object as it is, but no sooner is pencil put to paper than the symbolic preconception of what we are looking at comes bubbling ahead. An example is when we draw an eye. Every beginner artist draws the universal symbol for an eye: an elliptical football shape with a circle for the iris. Learning how to draw people is about extricating these symbolic preconceptions.

The tried-and-true classical approach to drawing people is to first draw the large overall shape of the head. Generally, this is called the contour . I prefer to term this first instance as striking the arabesque . Terminology implies intent. For me, contour is static whereas arabesque speaks of rhythm and movement.

The overall shape of the head is more rectilinear than it is an oval. An excellent training exercise is to strike the arabesque of simple shapes on a sheet of plexiglass using a water-soluble black marker and then hold it up to your object to ascertain the accuracy of your drawing. Down-filled pillows that hold a shape when scrunched up are excellent fodder for learning how to draw people.

Once the arabesque is accurately drawn the next step is to place the brow line. Anatomically speaking, this is the Supra Orbital Eminence . This thick, horizontal skeletal structure is the singularly most important landmark in drawing people. Misplace this feature and your portrait drawing is doomed. There is no mincing words here. From the brow line every other feature is mapped.

Let us take our training exercise a step further. Affix a 1/4 inch strip of black tape horizontally onto your scratched up pillow a short distance above the center point. Without pre-measuring take your best guess and indicate the placement of this tape within your arabesque on the plexiglass. Now hold up the plexiglass to your pillow – you will need to focus your drawing so that the arabesque fits – and ascertain the accuracy of your brow line.

Most beginners will place the brow line too high. The reason for this, again, is our inveterate symbolic preconceptions. When we correspond with other people it is the facial expressions that play the largest role in a dialogue. Here, we tend to over-emphasize the face in our portrait drawing.

Spending even a short time on this very powerful drawing exercise pays handsome dividends. Training yourself to consistently strike the arabesque and place the brow line accurately is your critical first step in learning how to draw people.

The Choice Of Place Also Influences The Longevity Of Petroglyphs

Good places to look for rock art are the sites of ancient villas and ruins such as Mesa Verde, water sources, and animal trails. Rock artists chose particular locations for some images. Abstract images could include dots, spirals, diamonds, meandering lines, and sunbursts. Spirals could represent water and were sometimes carved on rocks where rain…

Good places to look for rock art are the sites of ancient villas and ruins such as Mesa Verde, water sources, and animal trails.

Rock artists chose particular locations for some images. Abstract images could include dots, spirals, diamonds, meandering lines, and sunbursts. Spirals could represent water and were sometimes carved on rocks where rain collections. At times, they drew recognizable objects such as weapons, people, and animals. Abstract shapes were also part of their arsenal and could include strange creatures from their visions or anthropomorphs, creatures that have resembled human figures but have exaggerated body features.

On some rock surfaces there are superimposed paintings and engravings. This form of, what we would now call graffiti, is primarily psychological in nature, as one drawing leads to another, and some of the depictions are becoming holier and more invested with power. Each new picture as is the case at Cueva Pintada in Baja California Sur, where multiple layers of giant, superimposed human and animal figures interact in a spiritual-like dance.

It is assumed that rock art was meant to be used repeatedly and durability may have factored in the decision to use rock as it was so plentiful and readily available. In most arid regions rock dominates the landscape and is readily available.

Not much rock art was put in the mountains despite the rocks were plentiful. It is suggested that arable lands were far removed from the mountains and the right kind of rock was not present. Wind-deposited sandstone (aeolian) is the preferred rock medium in which to cut petroglyphs rather than the uneven and metamorphic rocks found in the mountains.

Sandstone abound in the Great Basin region where the Fremont and Anasazi lived in the high desert canyon. Prehistoric rock art is found along the base of cliffs, on large detached boulders, in large overhung alcoves and beneth protruding ledges … on near-vertical surfaces. Pictograph images tend to be in more protected areas such as caves and under overanging ledges.

Although the region has an incredible amount of ideal sites for petroglyph-making and human activity abounded in some areas, it looks like the ancient ones thought specific locations to create their images. Rock art is often found near flowing water, near game trails or migratory routes, farming camps, and near canyon convergences. It has been noted that some art sites correlate with cultural activities but all the evidence is speculative.

Are You Interested In The History Of Art?

I was involved in an interesting conversation the other day, which involved a group of friends. They had been examining some paintings recently and one was outlining the history of those paintings to the rest of the group. It was an informative explanation and seemed to be of interest to all. Of interest to all,…

I was involved in an interesting conversation the other day, which involved a group of friends. They had been examining some paintings recently and one was outlining the history of those paintings to the rest of the group. It was an informative explanation and seemed to be of interest to all.

Of interest to all, that is, except for one member of the group. He actually seemed to actively dislike the idea of ​​having so much knowledge about individual works of art. He asked if this really added anything to understanding of the pieces and even suggested that it takes some of the fun away from the experience of examining a piece of artwork.

In a sense, I guess that he was suggesting that there was an element of thinking too hard about things. This is an area that interests me and can certainly sometimes be applied to the thought of reading books, or watching movies. There have certainly been circumstances in the past where I have found that a little too much knowledge can actually detract from an otherwise enjoyable experience.

Indeed, I have seen examples of costume dramas being criticized by experts who have noted that some historical elements are not presented correctly. Although it's clearly important, to some, that all elements are correct, how much does it really matter?

For many of us, watching a show of that type is more about the story and the interaction between the individual characters. We do not really want to be on the receiving end of a history lecture. Instead, we are happy to forget such questions and to sit back and be entertained. I imagine that my friend was hinting at such thought, in the context of paintings.

I do not actually see this as being something that's purely limited to the world of paintings. It could easily be applied to sculpture or photography too. So this rather poses a question: does history matter to you in such contexts? There are many who would say that they gain an enormous amount by studying the history of art.

It's certainly easy to see how they can gain insights into specific elements, allowing them to gain a greater understanding of what is presented and what was intended. Having some knowledge of the artist's background and family history may, as an example, help to explain some of the choices that are made.

By the same token, it can be useful to have an understanding of influences. It's very likely that an individual artist will actually have seen numerous other pieces of art. It would be impossible to expect that such previous considerations could be ejected from the memory.

What becomes clear is that any piece of art is certainly a product of more than the simple imagination and talent of an artist. It is also, almost by default, a product of the history of that individual.

Custom Spray Painting a Bicycle

Before you start airbrushing, accustom yourself with how your airbrush handles. Start on a piece of card to practice, until you are confident with how your airbrush works. Airbrushes use compressed air to spray the pigment from the gun. You can use an electric air compressor or canned propellant. For the first timers out there,…

Before you start airbrushing, accustom yourself with how your airbrush handles. Start on a piece of card to practice, until you are confident with how your airbrush works.

Airbrushes use compressed air to spray the pigment from the gun. You can use an electric air compressor or canned propellant. For the first timers out there, the canned propellant is the cheapest and easiest route to take, electric air compressors tend to cost a lot of money. Either will be fine for this exercise, I used canned propellant for portability.

To start with I disassembled the bike so I could prepare the metal work. (Making sure I remembered how to put it back together). Using a fine grade sandwich I sanded down the frame of the bike to reveal the bare metal underneath and to key in the primer. Next the primer is applied using the airbrush and a 1.3 to 2.5 mm paint nozzle to ensure even coverage. The primer is then sanded with 600 grit weight wet-dry sandpaper before the base coat is applied on top.

Use the same size nozzle as before to apply the base coat ensuring even coverage and not to spray too much in one area. Runs are easy to sort out with gentle sanding but if possible avoidance is the best course.

Once the base coat is thoroughly dry, a clear coat is applied on top, this protects the base coat from scratches, dirt and gives a nice shine. Before the design work can be airbrushed on, the area to be sprayed must be wet sanded with 600 to 1500 grit weight sandpaper, being very careful not to sand through to the base coat. For very uneven blemishes 600 grit sand paper is best. If the paintwork looks smooth and blemish free 1000 to 1500 will do.

This will smooth out any imperfections and give enough tooth for the airbrush paint to adhere to the surface. Sand the surface until it is uniformly dull. Keep the wallpaper wet, it may be easier to get a bucket of water and keep it close at hand. Once sanded to a dull finish use a soft cloth or soft paper towel and some degreaser to clean and remove oily fingerprints and any other muck that may be on the paint work. Dry the de-greased part immediately with a clean cloth or towel if it is allowed to evaporate rings will appear and spoil the final design.

This is now where your own creative flair comes in to play. Using a mask, I used frisket film, draw out your design, then using a scalpel and a sharp blade, cut out the different color sections of your picture, being careful not to cut yourself. When finished stick your complete design on the frame, with all the cut out pieces in place.

Now one by one peel off each color section and spray that color. This is where the practice earlier comes in tender. You need to start spraying before you get to the area you want to paint and spray just passed where you want to stop spraying, that way you will get a nice even coverage and hopefully no runs. Once you have finished that section allow the paint to dry completely then replace the film over that section and move onto the next color or section. Carry on till your design is complete.

When the design is finished and completely dry a final clear coat is applied as before over the top sealing and finishing your design. Now put the kettle on, make a cup of tea and admire your work.