How to Market Your Art Effectively

The main goal of artists today is to increase the traffic to their websites so that people can view their art, which in turn generates sales. None of this is easy. So what can artists do to exhibit their work and to get the most exposure? Your artwork may be wonderful, but what is the…

The main goal of artists today is to increase the traffic to their websites so that people can view their art, which in turn generates sales. None of this is easy. So what can artists do to exhibit their work and to get the most exposure? Your artwork may be wonderful, but what is the point if nobody ever sees it? And remember, you are not the only artist in the world: you have to be able to compete with millions of other artists all around the world.

The main thing you need to be clear about is that you are not just an advertising website which survives on passing trade. You also have an online art website that needs traffic, but more than numbers, it needs visitors who buy. What would be the purpose of getting thousands of people to visit your website but none of them makes a single purchase? The bottom line is that your marketing campaign has to be of such a nature that it attracts those people who are keen and interested in buying and investing in art.

Here you have to decide on your business model, which will decide the structuring and pricing of the items for sale. If you are a budding artist then it is safer to have lower prices in order to attract more buyers. Higher prices may give you better profits, but only if you actually make a sale. Initially, lower prices are advised to help create a consumer base. After a while, as your art starts generating demand, you may start looking at raising the prices. Low cost reproductions can prove to be quite beneficial in terms of generating revenue too.

You should also showcase your art to the local neighborhood by organizing shows and exhibitions. This will help create more awareness in your own community and if things go well, your reputation will spread to other communities. You can also work with online art galleries in order to sell your own work. These galleries are among the places where genuine buyers go and your presence there will help a great deal in selling your work and directing Buyers to your personal website if you add your website's hyperlink to all your artwork.

In addition, you should have your art webpage on popular social networking sites and actively participate in discussions and discussions on topics related to your field of work. Along with giving you better visibility, it will make people curious to know the person behind the discussions and in this way you may get some potential buyers to visit your webpage. It is important to include your latest works and to give any information concerning the inspiration and story behind the production of your latest artwork. Create an aura around you to generate interest.

All of this is not going to happen in one day and it will require you to keep up a good and consistent standard of work for a long time in order to be successful. Do not compromise on your standard of work at all, because at the end of the day the art you create has to sell, irrespective of the marketing strategy.

How to Paint Eyes – Easy Tips For Painting Realistic Eyes

When learning how to paint eyes and portraits, it's pretty important to learn how to paint them realistically. Like all facial features, if the eyes are not correct, the likeness of the subject will be lost. If the subject is far away, you can get away with less detail, but if the subject is close,…

When learning how to paint eyes and portraits, it's pretty important to learn how to paint them realistically. Like all facial features, if the eyes are not correct, the likeness of the subject will be lost. If the subject is far away, you can get away with less detail, but if the subject is close, you will need to pay attention to details. Follow these guidelines and you should see improvements in your painting efforts.

Components

There are quite a few steps in accurately painting the facial features of the human eye. When you paint eyes, remember to include the upper and lower eyelids, the white and colored parts, the iris and pupil, the eyelashes, the membrane in the corner and the highlights. It is including each of these components that gives the eye depth and realism.

Placement

Whenever I paint portraits, I like to make the task as easy as possible. I like to paint, not draw. For this reason, I almost always use tracing paper, the grid method or the carbon tracing method to get a most accurate sketch on the canvas. My favorite method is the carbon tracing method. You will need a printed black and white copy of the subject to be painted. This copy needs to be the exact size that you are painting. Take some soft charcoal and darken the back of the copy. Now place the paper on the canvas with the carbon side down. With a sharp pencil, trace the entire eye (and the rest of the photo too). Your drawing should be exactly in correct placement because you have followed the lines on the photo.

If you do this, then you should not have too much difficulty with the placement of the eyes. With whiche method you use for getting the sketch on the canvas, and if your reference photo is the same size as the painting, you could also use a ruler to make sure that your drawing is accurate. Sometimes the smallest mistake can make your eyes seem out of place. It's worth the time it takes to get the drawing correct.

Applying Color

For this example I will start with the outside and work inward. Assuming that you have your skin color mixed and on the palette, apply a thin coat of color to the entire area. Be careful not to cover up or hide your pencil / charcoal drawing however. Now lighten that color and apply a light coat to the upper lid for highlight. To emphasizes the creases, add some dark lines back in. Continue adding layers of skin color until your drawing is covered by paint. Now add white paint to the “white” portion of the eye. This white is usually grayed down. Look closely and you will see that the white of an eye is not pure white. Next, add a tiny bit of pink in the corner or the membrane. Now with what ever color the iris is, paint in a circular shape in the colored area or iris. Brown eyes typically have a “wagon wheel” spoke look to them. Use varying shade of browns to mimic the correct color. Blue eyes tend to have more of a circular shape. Darken the iris color on the palette and paint in each pupil, then outline each iris. The final white highlight is the finishing touch for the completed eyeball. Add a tiny bright white highlight in each pupil. The highlight gives the indication of moisture and reflection. To create the eyelids, a very light skin color usually works best to re-define the top and lower lids.

Adding Eyelashes and Eyebrows

When adding eyelashes, care needs to be taken so that you do not ruin them by adding too many! Less is sometimes more when it comes to adding eyelashes and eyebrows. Follow the exact shape of the eyelashes with a fine tipped brush and quick small strokes paint in a few of the eyelashes. Note that in general, eyelashes go outward not straight up! The more you paint in, the more prominent they will be on the painting, especially on the bottom lid. I suggest to paint in a few, step back and look before painting any more. For the eyebrows, the same is true, small quick strokes, step back and view often so that you do not overdo them.

Now you have all the components of the eye in place. A little fine tuning and highlights and or shadows and your portrait efforts should be fantastic! This is truly learning how to paint eyes the easy way.

Acrylic Painting Techniques

When people search for a fun hobby, they often experiment with painting. Many begin with oil painting and quickly get discouraged because oil painting is messy and the results take several days, weeks or months to be achieved. Acrylic painting is a better choice if you are like me and do not like to wait…

When people search for a fun hobby, they often experiment with painting. Many begin with oil painting and quickly get discouraged because oil painting is messy and the results take several days, weeks or months to be achieved. Acrylic painting is a better choice if you are like me and do not like to wait for results. When you understand the versatility and flexibility, you'll probably choose this medium for your hobby needs. Painting techniques come as you practice and follow the suggestions in this article.

If you are taking up painting for the first time or looking to switch to an easy-to-use medium, acrylic painting is a wonderful choice with a lot of flexibility. Faster-drying than oil paints, acrylics are easy to use and even easier to clean up, requiring only soap and water. There is special soap though, that you can purchase if you choose to.

Techniques For A Quick-Drying Medium

Because acrylic paints tend to dry more quickly than oil paints, an entire painting can usually be completed rather quickly. If you need your paint to stay wet longer, they can be mixed with “extenders” that prevent them from drying too quickly. Acrylic paints can be purchased either in tubes of a thick paste or bottles that are thinner than the paste, depending on your desired consistency.

The versatility of acrylic paints allow you to add mediums like floaters and glazes to gain a watercolor-style look or texture to achieve an oil-painted look without having to invest in the more expensive and more difficult to use oil-based paints. (Oil paints must be cleaned using paint thinner and can take as long as six months to finish drying!)

Because acrylics do dry out more quickly, it is important to only put a small amount of paint on the palette at a time. Close the container when you're not using it. Tupperware and other plastic storage containers work well for storing the paint. I always use a mist or spray bottle and wet the paints before storage.

If you find that you work too slowly for the paint to stay workable, you can invest in a “stay-wet” palette to prolong the time that the paint remains in workable condition or use a palette that has a lid that closes to protect the paint. I also sometimes use a large seal-able gallon size bag and slide my paper plate with paint inside for storage.

Painting Surfaces For Acrylic Paints

The versatility of acrylic paints allows them to be used on many different surfaces, from the traditional artist canvas to unique surfaces like wood, saw blades, or slate. Canvases can be purchased already stretched on a frame or in rolls or sheets. Do not be afraid to use your imagination – acrylic paints can even be mixed with a fabric medium and used on fabrics (read the directions; they may require heat to set the paint).

If you choose to paint on porous surfaces like wood, prime it first. Every art supply store carries a variety of primers from which you can choose. While you can use acrylic paints on an un-primed canvas, they do come pre-primed and in my experience, this is preferred.

Acrylic painting is a wonderful medium. You may hear people complain about the paintings drying too quickly, but I find that to be an advantage because I can finish paintings much more quickly and have more artwork out on the market or on display faster than if I used oils or watercolors.

So if you are looking for a great hobby, follow these tips and acrylic painting techniques to make the most out of this great activity.

Techniques on Painting and Painting Tips

The following techniques on painting should help you to create beautiful artwork. I suggest that you practice on something other than your final painting. A pad of canvas paper works great for practice space. Yes, you will make mistakes and paintings that you simply are not happy with. The goal of this article is to…

The following techniques on painting should help you to create beautiful artwork. I suggest that you practice on something other than your final painting. A pad of canvas paper works great for practice space. Yes, you will make mistakes and paintings that you simply are not happy with. The goal of this article is to give you some techniques on painting so that you can make fewer of those mistakes and that you will love all of your paintings! You'll find as you practice just how easy it is to make images using acrylic paints and a brush.

Tips for painting trees

When painting trees and tree branches, I first use a round brush to paint in the main trunk; then I use a smaller brush to add branches and finally a script liner to add the smallest branches. Some of the branches should overlap each other. If you are adding leaves or foliage, do not stress over the branches because many of them will be covered up anyways. Always remember that you are painting the “indication” of items in a painting. So when it comes to branches, just paint the indication of them!

To paint pine trees, use a fan brush. Start by holding the fan brush vertically to dab in the trunk of the tree. One reason that I do this is so that I have a nice vertical point to base my tree on. Then use the flat side of the fan brush to dab in branches. The branches do not need to be even or symmetrical and will actually look unreal if they are too perfect.

Other techniques on painting nature

To paint rocks, start with a solid under-painting. Purples, blues, and some burnt sienna or browns work well. Round the tops of the rocks and keep the bases flat. Now with a dirty white color, paint over some of the under-painting. Let some of the dark show through. You can add just a tiny touch of orange or yellows for highlights as well.

Painting birds requires nothing more than a small amount of paint on a small detail brush and then small, v-shaped objects. Because these birds are often added as finishing detail to the background, the birds themselves do not require much detail at all. They can be made using whatever blend of colors complements the picture you are painting

For dew or rain drops, with a color slightly lighter than the petal or leaf, paint an oval. This will be the center of the drop. With a color slightly darker than the petal or leaf, paint a half moon in the top portion of the oval and a half moon under the oval. With pure white add just a touch of highlight on the top of the oval. On the drops that are just about to drip, do not paint the bottom oval. With pure white, pull down a couple tiny little rays of light.

When painting grass, under-paint the area where you will have the grass in a darker shade of green. Fill your brush with the green paint and use upward brush strokes. Use your No. 10 or No. 6 bristle brush. Add individual blades of grass in a lighter green shade (mix green with white or yellow to attain your desired color) and use a thinner brush or script brush to paint in blades of grass using upward strokes.

To add shadows: whenever you are painting a picture, even if there is no sun or light source represented in the painting, you need to consider what direction the light would be coming from. The surfaces of the objects in your paintings that would be hit by the light should be lighter, while the parts of the object in shadow should be darker.

These are just a few techniques on painting and painting tips that may help you develop wonderful artwork. I hope your paintings benefit from it.

Painting a Beach Scene – Some Very Helpful Tips

One of the most popular subjects at art classes are beach scenes to paint. Learning how to paint a beach scene can be done in several ways. The easiest of course is painting a calm day at the beach. For the more adventurous artist, a rough storm beach may be the task at hand. Here…

One of the most popular subjects at art classes are beach scenes to paint. Learning how to paint a beach scene can be done in several ways. The easiest of course is painting a calm day at the beach. For the more adventurous artist, a rough storm beach may be the task at hand. Here are some basic tips to help you learn how to paint a beach scene.

Painting the Sky

In general, you should start any landscape or seascape painting with the sky. Examine various pictures or other paintings to determine how you would like your sky to appear. The sky and water can meet anywhere on the canvas. If the horizon line is lower on the canvas, the sky will be the emphasis, likewise, if the horizon line is high on the canvas, there will be more water, and this will be the emphasis. I like to keep the top portion of the sky the darkest and lighten as I worked downward. As you paint, bring the sky colors down beneath where the horizon line or ocean will start. And tiny touches of reds, yellows, dark blues, or oranges to add interest and drama to the sky. Sometimes simply allowing streaks of color to show will appear as if they are the distant clouds. If you do not know how to paint white fluffy clouds than just let the sky remain plain. Many people try to blend their colors so that no lines or variation shows. This is a mistake. A viewer will look at the painting because it interests them. So be aware that you should not try to blend and smooth your sky colors too much. Remember that the more colors and “movement” in the sky, the more turbulent the weather will appear.

Painting the Water

Now it is time to paint the water in your beach scene. Always use the same colors in the water as you used in the sky. You will want to darken the colors however. Starting at the horizon line, paint in a straight horizontal horizon. The straighter this top edge of water, the more distant it will appear. Now work your water forward, adding and varying the colors. Mix in some greens, browns and even Touches of reds. Use the same combination of sky colors, just use more of them. Remember not to over blend the colors. Also for the perception of depth, remember that objects, even waves, will appear smaller and more horizontal in the distance. Therefore any roughness or waves will be smaller in the background and enlarge as you work forward. For the appearance of shallow water lighten the colors by adding yellows.

Painting the Beach

The easiest way to begin a beach is to add browns to the water area as you approach where the land begins. Remember that water is transparent so begin to add the sand color while decreasing the blue water color. Now you should be almost to the bottom or front of the canvas. If you start adding white to the sand color it will appear that the sand is moist. I like to use loose long vertical “z” strokes with some white as I complete my final areas of the beach. Work this beach color right to the bottom of the canvas.

Waves, Rocks and Final Touches

Waves can be indicated by adding small choppy strokes of dark and or light colors. Variety is the key when it comes to indicating that water is in motion. If you want to create some dramatic movement of waves, you might want to add some white wave tops by dabbing spots of white in wave shapes near the front of the painting where the water would be hitting land or rocks. To add rocks, paint some dark “rock” forms near the front of the canvas. Keep the bottom of the rocks nice and horizontal. Lighten the dark rock color and highlight each rock, but be careful not to paint over all of the base color. If you need to highlight that color even more, touch on some final bright highlights where the light might be the brightest on the rock. Gently dab white here and there around the rock bases or where water would be splashing. Straight lines of white at the base of the rocks give the indication of water and help to “set” the rock nicely into the painting.

If you keep practicing using these tips you are sure to be able to paint a beach scene in no time. In the beginning, keep it simple and paint a calm day beach scene. As you become more experienced, add drama by using more color and stroke variety. Have fun practicing these beach scenes to paint.

Online Art Galleries Vs Traditional Art Galleries

Times have changed since the IT revolution and these days the rest of the world is just a click away. Gone are the days when you had to travel long distances in order to admire a piece of artwork, or sometimes Sometimes never getting to view it just because you were unable to make the…

Times have changed since the IT revolution and these days the rest of the world is just a click away. Gone are the days when you had to travel long distances in order to admire a piece of artwork, or sometimes Sometimes never getting to view it just because you were unable to make the trip.

Online art galleries have successfully solved such problems for art enthusiasts. Not only is it now possible to see work from artists all around the globe, but it is also an excellent platform for both budding and renowned artists to showcase their work on a much larger scale.

These online art galleries are a virtual platform to view, sell and buy pieces of art. The ease of every transaction is unimaginable. Now, irrespective of the time, you can browse through the gallery and place a bid with the click of a button. If you do not wish to be known then there is no better way of buying art than on an online auction, because here your identity is kept private. The payment gateways are completely secure and you can rest assured that your money is in safe hands.

In a traditional art gallery, there is always the risk of a piece of art being inauthentic. This is certainly not the case with online art galleries. Firstly, as a buyer, you have the option of interacting with the artist before making a purchase. Secondly, every purchase comes with a certificate of authenticity that guarantees an original purchase.

Obviously, there is much charm and intrigue associated with actually seeing a piece of art in person, but how many of us can actually do so? Daily commitments, travel costs and work related issues are just some of the reasons why most people can not visit traditional art galleries. There may be others reasons too, but reasons related to daily living are the main reasons why you can not indulge in your love for art in person as you would like to. This is where an art art gallery has a definite edge over a traditional art gallery. Now you can buy your art without spending a single extra penny on travel expenses because your only expense is the price of the artwork.

The advantages are not just for the buyer but for the artist too. A physical display in a traditional gallery would mean that only a select number of people would actually get to see the art, compared to the millions of viewers that would get to view it if displayed in an online gallery. When it comes to exposure, availability and recognition, a comparison between an online art gallery and a traditional art gallery is pointless. Apart from the exposure, online galleries also have various contests and awards for recognizing the talent of the artists and giving handsome prizes to the winning artist or artists.

Even having your own personal website will not bring you as much traffic as an online art gallery. You may add your personal website's hyperlink to your art pieces and people who would like to contact you or view more of your work will have the option to do so. Times have changed and so have consumers. Today's buyers want instant gratification without wasting any valuable time, and online art galleries amply provide for these needs.

Rene Magritte: Raining Men and Apples

Everything is more memorable when it's connected to a song or a piece of music. A distant dwindling emotion is immediately heightened, an old love we'd done our best to mentally burn to ashes and scatter into the abyss of oblivion is immediately resurrected, a place is recalled, an incident is brought forth or we…

Everything is more memorable when it's connected to a song or a piece of music. A distant dwindling emotion is immediately heightened, an old love we'd done our best to mentally burn to ashes and scatter into the abyss of oblivion is immediately resurrected, a place is recalled, an incident is brought forth or we ourselves are jolted back if any of those things were accompanied by music when we experienced them.

I chanced upon the work of René Magritte a few years ago when I was watching television at a friend's house. After a succession of alarmingly talentless pop stars, a song came on by a classical Arab singer I absolutely adore, an icon and one of the very few I follow. I sat up attentively and increased the volume.

Julia Boutrous is the epitome of class, talent, patriotism and femininity in the Middle-East. Her voice is soft and pure and she represents a period in the evolution of Arabic music when more value was placed on substance, depth and talent. She also happens to be extremely beautiful.

The name of the song was “Shi ghareeb” which in Arabic translates to ” Something strange “. What I found strange , in the most positive way, was the video for this song.

Blue and white were the dominant colors in the video; Julia is seen in an empty room with a window, a mirror and a framed canvas. When she's not looking at her own reflection in those objects, she's watching clocks dropping from the white clouds, or a rain of green apples and fitted clock-faced bowler-hat-wearing men. It made absolutely no sense.

I learned later from my friend, an interior designer, that the video was inspired by several René Magritte paintings. Mainly Golconde and The Listening Room .

René Magritte was a Belgian surrealist artist and writer. Prior to adopting a Surrealist style Magritte's art was initially impressionistic. His first surrealist painting was The Lost Jockey.

He held his first exhibition in Brussels in 1927 to scathing reviews from critics. He left to Paris following this failure and that's where he got even more involved with the Surrealist movement when he met André Breton, the French poet, writer and the founder of Surrealism.

What I enjoy about Magritte's paintings is that he never tried to tell us what he meant with his art. Like all Surrealists, Magritte aimed to reveal the unconscious mind. However, he did that by juxtaposing his seemingly unrelated symbols and offered your unconsciousness the pleasure of making a connection itself. His paintings often included the 'man-made' side by side with the 'natural', sometimes in a way indicating a rivalry or a struggle. For example, a brick wall and a clear sky, an apple and a man with a bowler's hat, a naked woman with a mirror, trees growing out of a table, and so on. Was he alluding to us consciously (man-made) restraining our unconscious minds (which are natural and limitless)? I am no art critic, but I'd like to think that in some of his paintings, Magritte does exactly that. The titles of his paintings are more hints about their meanings than they are descriptions about what we are looking at.

At the age of thirteen, Magritte's mother committed suicide by drowning herself in a river. She was found dead with her dress over her face. Her suicide had a big impact on Magritte's art and the many paintings of his people with hidden faces are thought to be the result of that experience.

The Vancouver Art gallery is hosting a Surrealism exhibition (The Color of my Dream; the Surrealist Revolution in Art), and Magritte's paintings are among those on display. I intend on going there before the exhibition ends in September. I'll be thinking of Julia Boutrous when I do.

Paul Gauguin

Vincent Van Gogh is easily among the best known and most beloved artists in art history. However, it is worth remembering that while Van Gogh went to Arles to start his ut utian artistic colony, he was desperate for one particular artist to come see him and share in his dream. That artist was French…

Vincent Van Gogh is easily among the best known and most beloved artists in art history. However, it is worth remembering that while Van Gogh went to Arles to start his ut utian artistic colony, he was desperate for one particular artist to come see him and share in his dream. That artist was French painter Paul Gauguin, whose approval was highly taken by Van Gogh. Indeed, artists like Picasso and Matisse were highly inspired by the works of Gauguin and his legacy also lives in their works.

Gauguin started his artistic career painting in his free time. He liked to go to art exhibits and bough paintings of contemporary artists. He also befriended Camille Pissarro who in turn introduced him to a number of other artists, including Paul Cezanne with what he has in later times often been compared. However, the most famous works of Gauguin came about not through his connections with other artists but through his travel to the Caribbean. Here, his art developed past the norms of impressionism as local symbolism and pure colored colors entered his paintings. He produced a number of paintings depicting the natives of these exotic lands including “Tahitian Women on the Beach”, “Woman with a Flower” and many more. These paintings are all characterized by the same constant pure colors with the colors themselves being more important than the lines in the paintings. This resolved in some very powerful paintings, in which the colored colors themselves are at least as important as the motive in telling us the mood of the painting. This use of saturated colors in a subjective fashion along with the very basic shapes used to depict people inspired later movements like Fauvism, cubism and the Synthetist style in modern arts. As Europe was at the time fascinated by the arts of other cultures, especially the Japanese arts who counted artists like Monet among its followers, the exotic nature of the subjects and the inspiration from native arts also added to the appeal of the art of Gauguin.

However, like many an artist, Gauguin would never see such recognition while he was himself alive. He lead an unhealthy life with plenty of alcohol, compensated for a lack of income with manual labor like on the Panama canal and even got sent to 3 months in prison due to problems with both church and state. He never did serve this sentence however, as he died of syphilis in 1903 before the sentence could be carried out. He was 54 years old. The interest in his work took off soon after his death, with post-humorous exhibitions at the Salon d'Automne in Paris in 1903 and 1906 drawing large crowds. Among the spectators was Pablo Picasso who was immensely inspired by the works he saw there. The price of the works of Gauguin has followed the same trajectory as the artists fame and importance. Although they are rarely traded, works have been known to fetch prices of up to $ 39.2 million. The inspiration of Gauguin also extends beyond the painted canvas. Somerset Maugham's book “The Moon and Sixpence” is thus based on the life of Gauguin, just like both operas and piano concerts have been composed in his memory.

Today, most major works by Gauguin can be found at museums in the US, including at the Boston “Museum of Fine Arts”, the New York “Museum of Modern Arts” and the Albright-Know Art Gallery in Buffalo, New York.

Art Shows – Will They Help or Hinder Your Art Career?

The basic thing to remember about Art Shows is: they are not about winning the Blue Ribbon. If your painting is awarded 'Best in Show' it means that particular piece ticked the boxes for that particular judge on that particular day – that's all. It does not mean you are the best of all artists…

The basic thing to remember about Art Shows is: they are not about winning the Blue Ribbon. If your painting is awarded 'Best in Show' it means that particular piece ticked the boxes for that particular judge on that particular day – that's all. It does not mean you are the best of all artists showing their work at the show, rather than the crown for Miss Universe means the winner of that pageant is the most beautiful or charming woman in the world.

The real value of entering Art Shows is: the experience of putting your work out for public scrutiny.

  • It's invaluable practice for the days when you begin showing at a gallery, whether public or private. The elation you'll feel when you first win an award is a pleasure you'll remember for the rest of your life. If you can relish it while not letting it go to your head, and use the experience to understand the frustration felt by those artists who never gain recognition, then the experience will deepen your development as an artist and as a person. The disappointment you'll feel at not taking a prize or in not having anyone buy one of your pieces is bitter indeed. But it will help you accept – with dignity – the same result if it happens in the professional arena. Either way, you'll mix with other hopefuls at the shows, pick up tips from the experienced ones and learn how to overhear – without taking offense or undue pride – the comments made about your work by the public.
  • A prize won at such shows does confer on you an extra degree of confidence in the work you're doing. It is definitely taken into account by staff at the public galleries.
  • Does it count with staff at private galleries? From my experience – on both sides of the desk – the answer is: not a great deal.
  • Much more important to the commercial galleries are the quality of your work, the consistency of your style, and the seriousness of your focus on your career.
  • That said, the very fact that you've put your work out 'on the chopping block' as it was, to be judged in public, tells the gallery director a lot of good things about you and will encourage him or her to take a chance on you.

Art shows offer you another benefit – one I can best describe with an anddote from my first experience of exhibiting in a group show at a private gallery.

When I arrived, the director / owner asked me to stack my paintings along the wall. He prowled along them, then turned on me with a sentence that stopped my heartbeat: 'You can not be an artist!'

He answered my choked-out question with this: 'You've brought the number of canvases you said you would. They're all dry, varnished and framed. And you've brought invoices, in triplicate! '

That morning, the most popular artist in his 'stable' had turned up with about half the promised number of works, many of them still wet, unvarnished and unframed. Because he was the-then 'star' on the Brisbane scene, he regularly behaved in this unprofessional way, leaving the gallery people to fix up his messes.

So you can see, getting early practice at being professional is the major value of taking part in art shows at the beginning of your career in Art.

What I'm mulling over for the next article is: how to use the Internet to promote or sell your artwork.

(c) Dorothy Gauvin

Claude Monet’s Poplars

Among the most famous works by Claude Monet are his series of paintings. In these, he dedicated himself to a single subject and paths it through the different seasons, weather and times of day. These different times among other offers vastly different light and it is this effect of light that lay at the heart…

Among the most famous works by Claude Monet are his series of paintings. In these, he dedicated himself to a single subject and paths it through the different seasons, weather and times of day. These different times among other offers vastly different light and it is this effect of light that lay at the heart of Monet's painting series. The light that determined how parliament in London could look both red-orange in the early morning and blue and white in the mist of the Thames. It was similar effects that Monet explored in his paintings of Rouen Cathedral, of Haystacks and grain stacks in the French countryside and even of the water lilies in his own back yard. It is the comparability of the motives that enabled Monet to bring out the effects of the light and how it contrasted with the effects at different times of the day and year. These effects made the same motive evolve into very different paintings, though everything but the conditions in which it was influenced was the same.

The paintings of the series were made where the river makes an S-curve, thus making allowing poplar trees to select both the main subject and the background of the painting. While Monet painted three different Poplar motives, this is the main one of the series.

In order to paint the trees, Monet had to setup a floating studio in the River Epte. This studio was moored in the river. Monet would then go to the studio by a small boat and work on the paintings. However, further complications arose. The trees themselves were the property of the commune of Limetz, and the commune offered them up for auction to timber merchants before Monet could finish his whole series. This forced Monet himself to actually buy the trees so that he could finish his paintings. Once the series was complete, he then sold the trees back to the timber merchant who had originally expressed interest in them. Such such minor problems can have helped monet's move to more fixed subjects for his series of paintings, like Parliament and Rouen Cathedral and such. At least, there was less of a chance that he would be forced into buying any of those in order to finish his series of paintings.

While being an early series of paintings by Monet, Poplars also exhibit the idea of ​​the monet painting series as well as any. The way the different conditions create different light which in turn affects the palette Used to depict the trees is beautiful and expertly executed. The sense of nature in the paintings also adds to their appeal.

The different Poplar paintings can today be found at leading art museums across the world, including The Tate, The National Museum of Western Art in Tokyo and the National Gallery of Scotland.

Professional Makeup At The World Bodypainting Festival

The World Bodypainting Festival (WBF) is the World's largest body painting event and Championship including different professional makeup categories such as special effects makeup, sponge and brush and airbrush, UV effects and face painting. The 14th annual event was held at a new location in Pörtschach. The city of Pörtschach is located by the lake…

The World Bodypainting Festival (WBF) is the World's largest body painting event and Championship including different professional makeup categories such as special effects makeup, sponge and brush and airbrush, UV effects and face painting.

The 14th annual event was held at a new location in Pörtschach. The city of Pörtschach is located by the lake Wörthersee in Carinthia, the Southern part of Austria and can be reached within 15 minutes from the Klagenfurt airport.

Apart from attendees, sponsors and competitors Many sellers from around the world gather at the Bodypainting festival to showcase their newest products including professional makeup supplies, special effects makeup, face painting supplies and airbrush tattoos.

This year, the festival attracted over 24,000 visitors. Professional makeup artists from 42 countries competed for the World Championship. Apart from body painting, the WBF brings art, music and different shows together making this a magical experience.

The event is a great opportunity to attend several different workshops including professional makeup, special effects makeup, airbrush makeup, sponge and brush face painting and airbrush tattoos.

This year the WBF kicked off with the WBF academy which is a great opportunity to see professional makeup artists from around the world in action while offering classes and demonstrations in different categories including professional makeup, face painting, airbrush body painting, special effects makeup, professional makeup, photography, airbrush tattoos and more. Virtually hundreds of participants attended the workshops and took classes from the world's best instructors.

The themes for 2011 were “Renaissance – Rebirth” on the first 2 main days and “Haute Couture” on Sunday, the final day.

Friday was the first day of the event and it started with the category of Special Effects Make up and the preliminary round to the World Award in the category brush / sponge. The internationally reknowned jury of Mike Shane (Luxembourg), Craig Tracy (USA), Jinny (Canada), Filippo Loco (USA), Patrick McCann (Germany / USA), and Denis Penkov (Germany) and Ernst Wieser (Austria).

The event followed by fluoro competition and awards, sponge and brush, airbrush competition and amateur contest. The main categories which included brush / sponge, professional makeup, airbrush and special effects bodypainting were awarded with the World Champion title on the final day on Sunday.

The highlight of the show, the after party, took place on the final day of the event, and it is depicted by many as the “craziest party in the world”. By no doubt the WBF is one of the most thought after events in the face and body painting industry.

The 2012 is going to be the 15th anniversary of the World Bodypainting Festival and it will be held in Pörtschach. Austria. The event week is scheduled for July 2-8, 2012. It is highly recommended to register early especially for the WBF academy as there are limited seats available for each workshop in 2012.

The Church at Auvers

The painting “The Church at Auvers” is dramatic in its form. The land in front of the church is lit up by the light of day. The rays of the sun reach the ground here, and lush green vegetation thrives as a result. However, as we move closer to the church, the rays of the…

The painting “The Church at Auvers” is dramatic in its form. The land in front of the church is lit up by the light of day. The rays of the sun reach the ground here, and lush green vegetation thrives as a result. However, as we move closer to the church, the rays of the sun disappear as the church seems to rest in its own shadow. No light references or is reflected from this dismal building. The angles of the church building also seem warped, as if by an unholy hand. The roof beams are not strait and neither are the tiles and this warped exterior gives the church a certain menacing look. A threatening sky can also be seen rising behind the church, further illustrating this feeling of impending doom.

The deep brush strokes of Van Gogh are visible through the painting, both on the sunlit road, on the wavy growth in front of the church and on the roof of the church itself. The brush strokes depicting the sky are also visible and help create a movement in the sky above the church which helps to create the menacing impression. It is the sort of church one would mostly expect to find in a nightmare, and it can not be ruled out that Van Gogh, at this stage in his life and with his sanity in question, could have indeed felt as if he was living in exactly such a nightmare.

But the painting can also refer to Van Gogh's own religious career. After having been dismissed from the evangelical career he had earlier envisioned, he wrote his brother Theo how the church appeared to embميز “empty and unenlighted preaching”. This is also the sort of preaching one could probably find in this particular warped Church.

Another feature of “The Church at Auvers” is how two paths are diverging in front of the church. One peasant in the painting has already chosen the left of these paths. The presence of diverging paths is also found in “Wheatfield with Crows” by Van Gogh. We see these crossroads in Van Gogh's art at a time when the artist himself must be said to have been at a crossroad, deciding whether to fight for his sanity or give in to the impulses of his insanity. It is a recurring theme for Van Gogh as both sides battle for his soul in the last year of his life.

It should also be noted that the interpretive look of the church, as it was probably not quite as warped in reality, is based on the expression Van Gogh wanted to create. As such, the painting helps illustrate why Van Gogh was so important in the movement towards expressionism and why modern art still owed him a debt of gratitude.
The ominous look of “The Church at Auvers” has inspired the paintings use in popular culture. In the British TV drama “Doctor Who”, the good doctor eg spots an evil creature in the window of the painting and decided to go back in time to the time when The Church at Auvers was painted.

For those without time machines, the painting can today be seen at the Musee d'Orsay in Paris, France.

How to Paint Shrubbery Using Acrylic Paints

I am an artist, and my specialty is painting trees, shrubbery and flora. But my real passion is painting trees! Tress are an everyday sight, but are often overlooked as a source of inspiration for artists and photographers. But when painted, they can portray many different feelings. Depending on the composition, painting technique, texture, color…

I am an artist, and my specialty is painting trees, shrubbery and flora. But my real passion is painting trees! Tress are an everyday sight, but are often overlooked as a source of inspiration for artists and photographers. But when painted, they can portray many different feelings. Depending on the composition, painting technique, texture, color etc, the painting can render feelings from strength and energy to calm and peaceful.

One of the key elements when painting trees is to capture the strength and structure of the trunk and the irregularity of the branches. This is done by really working on the composition of the tree- exaggerating the contours of the branches in order to accentuate the overall shape. Play with the branches overlapping each other. Do not worry about drawing any leaves, shrubbery or flowers yet- the overall 'shapes' of the tree is so important. If your primary intention is to portray the strength of the tree, then make the out-line as angular as you dare. If you are wanting to create a more calm painting, then it is important to focus on the flora / fauna.

Once you have arranged and line drawn (in pencil) the overall composition of the trunk and branches, the next step is the paint the background- which usually in the case of painting trees will be the sky. This should not be as textured as you will be painting the branch and leaves, as it is obviously in the background and should just be a bowl build-up of color. Maybe a lovely blue, with white gently swirled in. Or a more dramatic blue / gray. The next step is to start layering your trunk and branches with paint. Go for the dark brown that you want in your picture, and then you will build up with the lighter colors until you finish with streaks of silver and gold. The key factor here is TEXTURE !!!! Look closely at a tree trunk- it is all about texture and bowl colors. Trees are never just brown like you might think- there is often a bowl array of colors ranging from browns (obviously!), Creams, moss green, bottle green, gray, lilac, white, black, silver, copper, gold.

So gradually build up the texture. I like to slap on the paint thickly, and then drag a comb that I have cut small, through the paint to create ridges. Experiment with this, you want to create as much texture as possible- think of the bark of a tree. And build it up slowly. If you know there are parts of the trunk / branches that will be covered with foliage or flowers, then do not build the texture up too much here otherwise it will be difficult to paint over.

Once you are happy with the above, move on to the flowers / leaves / foliage. Again, this is all about texture as well. But it is more haphazard than the trunk and branches. Paint with passion and do not worry about where you are necessarily putting the flowers or leaves. Nature is itself haphazard! I use a couple of paintbrushes here. A fan shaped one for the foliage background, then I build it up using a smaller rounded brush that I use to really 'splodge' the paint on thickly. Keep going till you are happy. Stand back and look long and hard at your painting. Look where, if any, you have painted the clouds in the background. Is there anywhere you think the sun should be shining on the trunk or foliage? If so, add specks of light to the foliage, and streaks of light to the trunk and branches. Finish off by adding a few streaks of silver and gold to the trunk and branches. Create as much depth to the painting as possible, by highlighting the highlights and shadows.

Finally, always, always varnish. I like a satin finish, but the choice is yours. Above all else, do not be too rigid when painting trees and shrubbery- remember you are painting nature, and nature is unpredictable!

What Are The Advantages of Selling Art Online?

Web-based artist networks, art marketplaces, and online art galleries are helping artists who are selling art online, a more and more common practice as time goes by. More often than not, selling your art online on your own can be an experience that disenchants many artists with the prospect of selling art online using any…

Web-based artist networks, art marketplaces, and online art galleries are helping artists who are selling art online, a more and more common practice as time goes by. More often than not, selling your art online on your own can be an experience that disenchants many artists with the prospect of selling art online using any tool; even a personal website can be difficult to manage in comparison to an online gallery account.

The online art market is growing importantly, and with online art sales on the rise, it is proving to be an amazingly fruitful avenue for artists, even compared to traditional methods for selling art as an artist. Previously established networks like those used by online art marketplaces and gallery settings have many things going for them that personal websites do not, possibly the ability to draw on greater authority rankings that help them appear higher on search engine results. Larger sites draw a large portion of the market of online art buyers looking for artists who are selling art online. These buyers are already seeking art to buy online, and are open to the prospect of purchasing directly from the artist. Selling your art online can be difficult if you are only selling from your own personal website. Increase the scope of the audience who can potentially see your work by including your pieces in an online art gallery or marketplace!

Traditional galleries have the problem that they are highly localized in their traffic, whereas with the online revolution, someone in England can buy a painting or sculpture piece from an artist in Hawaii, arrange for shipping, and pay the artist directly. Galleries also have limited wall space, which is not an issue when you're selling your art online.

Many websites have sprung up to help artists with the task of selling art online; they often charge a nominal fee, some one time, some annual, and some taking a commission of each sale an artist makes, but no matter the payment model being used this is often much less than an artist would pay to display their work in a traditional brick and mortar venue. A virtual listing for a piece of art allows the artist who is selling art online to display at least one image, often more, of their work as well as a description of the piece that can be key word optimized for better search engine exposure, and contact information for interested buyers. The advantages of selling your art works online are numerous, and center around the several ways that you can save both money and time. Your worries over maintaining a physical gallery space are over if you decide to work on selling your art online! No more rent and maintenance worries, no more adjusting your schedule to fit that of the gallery, with online art sales it is all between you as the artist and your buyer, and that is as it should be.

Compared to selling art pieces online, gallery sales are a lot harder to come by. But just because there is greater potential for an artist selling art online to make more sales does not mean that these sales will come without a little effort on the part of the artist. The way the internet works for someone selling art online it is all about your 'findability'. So when someone searches for something using a specific word or phrase, the websites which are ranked best for those terms come up in order of relevance and importance. The better you describe your work when creating a listing on an art sales website, the better chance you have of making a sale. Now this does not mean that you should find a list of popular search terms for selling art online and cram as many of them into your description box as possible, but rather select a few that are most closely associated with your piece or gallery as a while , and work those into your description text.

Making a sale using your new online gallery pages can be fun if you want it to be. This does not mean that marketing yourself will not require a little effort on your part, but if you let yourself enjoy the challenge, it can be a very rewarding way to see the fruits of your labor ripening on the vine. Promote yourself and your work through social networking sites like Facebook and Google+ with links to your gallery and pictures of your work (make sure to use watermarks to protect your unsold pieces) and encourage your friends and contacts to share these with their contacts as well. Selling art online does not have to be expensive or time-consuming if done correctly, so stay tuned for more information how to sell your art online and all the benefits you can expect to enjoy!

Selling Your Art Online – Can You Do It?

The World Wide Web is a wondrous technological advance in how we humans interact with each other. We all owe a debt of gratitude to Tim Berners-Lees for inventing it, back in 1980. The basic thing for artists to understand about the Web: it is all about Communication. The Web is the most cost-effective way…

The World Wide Web is a wondrous technological advance in how we humans interact with each other. We all owe a debt of gratitude to Tim Berners-Lees for inventing it, back in 1980. The basic thing for artists to understand about the Web: it is all about Communication.

The Web is the most cost-effective way to advertise your active presence in the art world. On the Web, you have a vast choice of venues on which to promote your art. But it is not primarily the place to try selling your artwork.

Back in 1985, when the Web was barely known outside of the scientific community, I was just starting out as a gallery owner-director. Some of you will remember the 'Eighties as the era of the' Gordon Gecko 'figure with his motto of' Greed is good. ' I soon found that the motto applied not only to Wall Street.

Disgusted and astonished was my reaction to news that private galleries in New York, in London and even in Sydney had begun taking decisions of fifty percent and higher. Some were also demanding a 'hanging fee' – in effect, artists had to pay rental on the gallery's wall space.

  • Disgusted – because I already knew from my own experience that if your business could not survive on the traditional commission – one-third of the selling price achieved – then you were doing something wrong. Although regulation is still voluntary, the Australian Commercial Galleries Association has now set the bar for ethical practice in Australia.
  • Astonished – because, as an artist, I surprised why other artists were accepting such terms. There is always the choice to get a job that pays a decent wage, and make art in your own time. That's what principled artists have always done.

Even the greatest names in Art history had to train in their craft and develop their style in obscurity while they waited for the longed-for attention from a patron. If the work was good enough, that attention always did come, sooner or later. Here, you might be thinking along the lines of 'What about Vincent Van Gogh, then?' Van Gogh is the stand-out exception that proves the rule. I do not intend to debate the merits of his artistic output, but a brief perusal of his life story will show you that he did very little to advance himself on the business side of the art scene.

  • Today, you have an unprecedented opportunity to build recognition. Uploading images of your art to the Web attracts the attention of collectors and galleries at little cost or effort to yourself. But you will be setting yourself up for disappointment if you fail to understand a basic truth about the Web.
  • There is a certain price level beyond which online art buyers will not go. Currently, this level sees a set at a few hundred dollars. Shipping costs for sculpture, pottery, even a low-priced painting, if it is framed or under glass, will deter many online shoppers. Put yourself in the buyer's shoes and you'll soon understand this reluctance.

After all, the people who are willing to pay thousands of dollars for a painting still want various assurances from a creditable expert in the field. The assurances they seek include a guarantee that the work they're buying is either stolen or a forgery. They want to know that the gallery will undertake to re-sell the work should they need to put it back on the market. Some dear souls even need re-assurance on their choice. They need the gallery nod that their selection is 'in good taste' and agreements with the prevailing Establishment fashion.

What's the solution? Some people resign themselves to churning out pieces priced to sell on the online market. At this soul-destroying rate of through-put, such people can never develop in a way that would satisfy the true artist.

  • There is a far better alternative.

Personally, I have never tried selling originals online and among the professional artists I know, not one has reported having sales by this method. However, like many others, I have had success in selling reasonably priced prints online, via a personal website.

The Web holds a treasure trove of information to educate the beginner on building and maintaining a website. I would just add this piece of advice:

Avoid those big, free, catch-all sites whenever they are general retailers or specialized art sites. You will be easily lost among the endless lists of other artists. Patience and perseverance with a well-designed personal website will get you the contacts you need. May I wish you success in the venture and lifelong joy in making your art.

(c) Dorothy Gauvin