Love Your Art, Decide Wisely About Buying Paintings

We can name three primary considerations that art lovers have to make whenever they are wondering if they should or should not purchase a painting. If you are in the business of selling paintings and you actually even own a gallery where you store them, then you must have been asked the to-buy-or-not-to-buy question countless…

We can name three primary considerations that art lovers have to make whenever they are wondering if they should or should not purchase a painting. If you are in the business of selling paintings and you actually even own a gallery where you store them, then you must have been asked the to-buy-or-not-to-buy question countless times. At the end of the day, you will realize that your proficiency in handling these types of queries would reflect on your sales or profits. You have to keep it in mind that the art buyers tend to be deep thinkers. They could also be quite an eccentric lot. They are there before not likely to buy a painting just because it looks good – there are other considerations they make. Basically, purchasing paintings is not purely an aesthetic cause, despite the fact that it is definitely an important part. Art buyers value a lot of things when it comes to making a purchasing decision, and we will try to look at three of them.

When art lovers are contemplating buying a painting, they are bound to also be curious as to who painted it or who created that artwork. Many artists have become well-known for the quality of their work and their names alone would convince art lovers to buy their paintings. As a matter of fact, some art lovers would even purchase a painting, sight unseen, for the simple reason that it was created by a certain artist, or it was associated with an artist whom they very admire. This is definitely an important consideration among some people; after all, the paintings are representative of the artist. They are an extension of the artist, even. It is akin to having an interest on the artists behind a song we like listening to. We sometimes look past the melody and the lyrics, and take note of the genius behind the songs.

It is also often the case that art lovers are curious to know about the inspiration behind the paintings created by the artists. You may have noticed how the most attractive paintings are those that are mysterious and quite inscrutable. It is not always easy to tell what the inspirations behind them are. When you know what has inspired the artist to come up with a painting, you will find yourself developing a greater appreciation for the artwork. The quality of the painting notwithstanding, many art lovers will base their decision to buy or not to buy a painting on the inspiration behind the artwork itself.

Buying paintings is also a decision that many art lovers base on the message conveyed in the paintings themselves. Coded messages are also found within abstract art paintings. This thirst for a deeper meaning or message often push sellers of these paintings to make up stories and tall tales in order to explain what the message of their works is supposed to be. This is not entirely wrong or bad. People viewing a painting tend to come up with their own interpretation of what message is supposedly hidden within it, anyway.

How To Develop Interesting Art Themes For The Home

When it becomes time to decorate one of the interior rooms of the house with a new theme, home owners may very well want to go with a style that mimics the desert areas of the United States. In addition to relying heavily on reds, oranges, and yellows, men and women can look for paintings…

When it becomes time to decorate one of the interior rooms of the house with a new theme, home owners may very well want to go with a style that mimics the desert areas of the United States. In addition to relying heavily on reds, oranges, and yellows, men and women can look for paintings that also fit the overall aura of the room. These paintings can be tastefully framed and hung on the walls in various places.

Southwestern art means different things to different people. Cowboys, of course, are a common motif in these kinds of art pieces. While some home owners may wish to find a number of disparate paintings, others may want to buy three or four that are held together by a common theme. Placing these pictures in a sun room might be the perfect touch. If individuals are not sure where to hang their newly acquired art, they can always consult with an interior decorator.

Framing the pieces will allow them to last longer. There are various woods that will work well with this kind of art. Cherry, pine, and oak are all elegant choices and can be found at most galleries. In addition to framing the images, however, men and women should put the art itself behind glass. This will prevent the matrix from becoming scratched by unruly guests.

Individuals should also develop a decent budget before they begin buying things. Although many of the thrilling art pieces are extremely expensive, art lovers need not break the bank in order to get a few nice objects for the living room or bedroom. In fact, some families may instead choose to slowly accumulate art through the years. This will keep their monthly budget intact.

Since individuals will be looking for nature themes, they should feel perfectly fine about buying items that feature elegant desert scenes. For example, a nice oil painting of a lonely cactus will improve the atmosphere of any room. If all household members are enthusiastic about interior decorating, they can go shopping together.

Ultimately, searching for Southwest paintings does not have to be an overly rigorous experience. Once men and women have a general idea of ​​the kind of art that they would like, they can make a strong effort to find it. Whether they love modern, impressionist, or abstract styles, they should be able to find a gallery that gives them what they are looking for. They can then go to work renovating their home decor.

Learning More About Pastels

There is invariably more that you can learn about pastels. The techniques needed when painting with pastels are continuously altering the more you go on to paint with them. When you are beginning to use pastels you must consider that the practice is all part of the study experience. By using different techniques and methods…

There is invariably more that you can learn about pastels. The techniques needed when painting with pastels are continuously altering the more you go on to paint with them. When you are beginning to use pastels you must consider that the practice is all part of the study experience. By using different techniques and methods you can further your pastel painting awareness. Below are some tips, tricks, and useful things to remember that 'll assist you to heighten the vibrancy of pastels as a painting medium:

  • Pastel paintings resignation with the proper paper. Watercolor paper is always a decent foundation and it's worthwhile to merely concluding playing with the pastels on some water color notepad. You can evaluate a few different weights of paper and approved brands before you go ahead and buy larger quantities and sizes which can be a costly outlay.
  • Ensure you check to see that the characteristics of the pastels (oil, soft or hard) that you are using matches the style. Each variety of pastel is used in a rather different means particularly with the soft and the oil pastels.
  • Pastels come in an extended choice of shades. In spite of this, to begin with you simply have to have a basic set of around 10 pastels in medium tones. And you can add black and white to darken or lighten the shade.
  • Most pastel artists apply the harder pastels sticks to set the background color, after that move into the softer pastels to bring out the colors and end with pastel pencil for the truly fine specifics.
  • The quality of the pastels will also shape your painting and how it looks.
  • You'll learn that generally brands will have pastels in sets, but, they will also fashion separate sticks which you can buy on their own if you draw with a particular color in surplus.
  • Different from other painting mediums, where you can mix the colors, with pastels you are limited to the level of “mixing” you can do. You can mix colors straight on the paper, but, manufacturers make all the different shades so it is simply a matter of choosing the tint you desire.
  • A further advantage of pastels is the speed at which you can use them. Since they do not have to have time to dry (as opposed to other types of painting medium) lots of pastel paintings can be painted speedily and effortlessly.
  • If you run out of one tint, do not despairs as long as you've taken a record of the brand name and number on the label you can replace it easily and if you keep with the same type, there should be little or no adjustment in color.
  • There is a certain means of assembly when making pastels. The colors go either brighter or darker each side of the mid tone, this also applies to the number sequence for nearly all manufactures, the numbers go up or down for the lighter or darker shades. As a result, you can locate matching colors to work with by using the numbering system. Using the same label is also good as you will get to know their numbering method.
  • The whole advantage of using pastels is to be as original as achievable with the simplest medium of paint and you can achieve this without difficulty with pastels.

Keep these tips, tricks and techniques in mind, they will aid you in your quest with painting with pastels. Bear in mind, there is always more to learn about pastels. You can on no account know too much.

Abstract Art Is Great for Beginners – Part 2

This article is unusual and strange but hopefully valuable. Soon I'm sure you will understand why … Is abstract art good for a beginner? Before you try to answer this question it would be useful to take a look at 2 examples, the first a random sketch intended to test a new set of water-soluble…

This article is unusual and strange but hopefully valuable. Soon I'm sure you will understand why …

Is abstract art good for a beginner?

Before you try to answer this question it would be useful to take a look at 2 examples, the first a random sketch intended to test a new set of water-soluble color pencils and the other something a little more serious though very nearly as unusual.

Sadly, as this is a text only article you can not see the pictures, but if you could see them the important question would be …

  1. Does this look like art to you?
  2. Or, as is most likely, would you see one as the try-out scribble and scrawl it is and nothing more?
  3. It could be trimmed to focus upon the best features

As with all good questions rather than just give straight answers it asks yet another question … “Does it really matter?”

Depending upon your point of view the answer may be “Yes!” Egypt “No!”.

Here are some important factors to think about …

  • If you have never painted before you certainly can not expect to paint a detailed and technically perfect drawing of a fighter jet plane (presuming of course that interests you)
  • If you do not know how to draw a four-sided square shape and give it depth so that it looks like a cube you would probably be surprised if you could create a 3D drawing of a timber-framed countryside cottage

Strange as it might seem …

“This article is the story of a real abstract painting using nothing more than a tube of blue watercolor paint, a brush, a glass of water and a piece of watercolor paper … Read on and see if this story is abstract yet informative enough for you

Now if you were to take a closer look at the watercolor you might realize that it was something rather more ambitious than you might have thought at first sight …

In fact what you would see is a watercolour painting that was inspired by a short series of loose sketches with charcoal pencils. Great Art they may not be but I'm sure you would find them interesting.

Indeed, the painting and sketches could well be something you will either like or simply hate because it makes no sense to you. However, if you are new to art and unfamiliar with the tools and materials of painting and drawing, this could be good news for you.

As far as the painting is concerned, the reason it is good is because it is the kind of painting that you could do with little risk of failure …

“And failure is the last thing you want to experience in your new hobby”

The beauty of this painting is that even if you do not consider it a work of art it does have interest …

“Perhaps the picture does not look like anything in particular but I'm sure you will agree that it does have some interesting qualities.”

If you look carefully there are depths bounded by the shapes that feel as if they could draw you in and investigate.

If this is not your first natural response I'd ask you to look again …

You are sure to see something you had not expected – “A surprise sometimes?”

And, if you do not like it as it is shown there are options that might improve it …

  1. Do you think it would look better rotated?
  2. Do you think it would be better still if it was turned upside down?

Do not worry if you do not understand the principles of abstract art fully. Rather, just take it that this kind of painting shows part of the excitation of art. Although it was inspired by a similar looking experimental charcoal pencil drawings it soon developed a life of its own.

It illustrates the fact that it does not matter how many years you have been drawing and painting there is plenty more to learn …

The search for understanding is what will keep you testing your imagination with painting and drawing experiments like the blue painting which, along with the charcoal experiments and water-soluble pencil tests, can be found with the links below.

And, if you are new to art, you can gain confidence fast by using a simple and easy way to learn how to draw and paint watercolors. By keeping things simple you can explore your own magic world of art without fear of disappointment or failure.

The Frieze of Life

A work of art can only come from the interior of man. Art is the form of the image formed upon the nerves, heart, brain and eye of man. My whole life has been spent walking by the side of a bottomless chasm, jumping from stone to stone. Sometimes I try to leave my narrow…

A work of art can only come from the interior of man. Art is the form of the image formed upon the nerves, heart, brain and eye of man.

My whole life has been spent walking by the side of a bottomless chasm, jumping from stone to stone. Sometimes I try to leave my narrow path and join the swirling mainstream of life, but I always find myself drawn inexorably back toward the chasm's edge, and there I shall walk walk until the day I finally fall into the abyss.

The way one sees is also dependent upon one's emotional state of mind. This is why a motif can be looked at in so many ways, and this is what makes art so interesting.

In my art I have tried to explain to myself life and its meaning. I have also tried to help others to clarify their lives.

Just as Leonardo da Vinci studied human anatomy and dissected corpses, so I try to dissect souls.

When I paint, I never think of selling. People simply fail to understand that we paint in order to experiment and to develop ourselves as we strive for greater heights. (Edvard Munch)

The Frieze of Life

What follows is an imagined conversation between Edvard Munch and his friend, Max Reinhardt.

Max Reinhardt: You said that we should no longer paint interiors with men reading and women knitting, that instead we should paint living people who breathe, who feel, who suffers and who love, did not you?

Edvard Munch: Yes, I did say that. I think that it is not enough to paint a sort of idealized picture, having someone pose, as if standing in front of a camera about to have a photograph taken. A painting is not a photograph.

MR: Why do you say that? It is the artist's task to show reality, is not it?

EM: Not to show reality, for what does that mean? It is real to show a worker standing by his bench, holding his tools and looking at his work, when in reality, as you say, he would hardly ever stand so. And besides, I do not think art deals with reality, at least not in any simplistic sense.

MR: Then what does art deal in?

EM: IN something larger than reality.

MR: What is bigger than reality?

EM: Life. Life is a bigger entity than any reality you can see, or take a photograph of, or even paint, come to that.

MR: Then what do you paint?

EM: Better ask why do you paint, and begin from there, do not you think?

MR: Alright, why do you paint? Why does anyone paint?

EM: First of all, I have to say that I can not speak for others. I can not really tell you why others paint. All I can do is say why I think I paint, and then let you make what you will of that.

MR: Why do you say, why I think I paint? Do not you know why you paint?

EM: I think I know, but a psychologist might give you a different answer to the one I give.

MR: But it is you I am interested in, your reasons for painting, not some others opinions of why you paint.

EM: That is well said, there are those who say they know more about my paintings than I know myself. They may be right in their opinions, I can not always find better reasons than they find. But, as critics of my work, I only quote the poet, Alexander Pope, when he says, 'Let such teach others who themselves excel', and censorship freely who have written well ', and while he was talking about the literary form of art rather than the more visual, the principle is the same.

An industry has grown up out of our brush strokes; one that has little to do with art and more to do with exploiting what artists do.

MR: Well then, I will ask you to tell me, without the vicarious comments of the critic who purports to know this and that about what you paint and why you paint it.

EM: I paint, I can not speak for others, but I paint to find out something more about my condition than I knew before I wet the first brush and began to paint.

MR: What do you find out? What is there to find out in that medium?

EM: The world.

MR: You learn a lot from your art then?

EM: I do. My art is who I am, you see. When you look at one of my paintings, you are cutting through a segment of my life.

MR: But then you are saying that your art speaks, are you?

EM: In ways that tell more than words can relate, for words – language, is bound by laws that have little to do with the human condition. When you write a sentence, you are limited by several things, I think you must agree.

MR: Things? What things?

EM: Well, at an elementary level, you are bound by letters, by words, by sentences. You are bound by what can and can not be said in language, are you not?

MR: That is true. What of music? Is the composer bound by such laws?

EM: He most certainly is, but they are not the same laws, of course, and the interpretation of his music is left to the listener without the medium of language to confine and conform.

The musician is bound by the notes that can be heard by the human ear, in that range and in no other, and although there is little equivalent in music of the word or the sentence to limit him, the musician is suddenless bound by laws that They are not found in the visual arts, excepting one.

MR: And that is?

EM: The plane in which he works; if he paints it is in the two dimensional, if he chisels marble, it is in three such.

Where all art is released from these various confines is in the receptor – in the being that sees, or hears or Touches.

MR: But then he is bound again in trying to say what he feels, about how he is affected by the art he takes some part in as the onlooker or listener, if you prefer.

EM: Precisely, and it is in this attempt in words to say what reasons have made me paint this way rather than another that the critic errs.

MR: Then who can say?

EM: No one can say with any certainty, for that is what words give – they apportion an amount of surety where there is none.

One person looks at my paintings, and then is told by what he repeatedly reads about what he has seen, told what to think he has seen, and in that telling, and that that thinking lies the error. Art is only truly that to the person experiencing it.

One man comes from the joys of lovemaking, one from the despair of bereavement, let us say, yet another comes from his place of work, or from his home, whatever that may be like, and yet we persist in saying that this art means such and such to all, as if ten men were but the one, as if a million were one. Art is whatever it is at the point of experiencing it.

MR: So how do you hope to convey your feelings to the person looking at what you have painted?

EM: I do not hope anything. I sincerely represent a feeling on canvas. That one man comes to my own experience is fortuitous indeed, though I fail to see how that can really be so.

MR: But if a person is able to express himself in those terms in which you have expressed yourself when painting, then sure there is some congruence, is there not?

EM: How can there be? Have we not just agreed that once an utterance is made in words, then something is lost, or say that something that is essentially made true, but how can that be reality when it is defined and confounded by words that adhere, as we have said, to laws that are not at one with feelings – real feelings. That is the difficulty of saying why I paint, and what my painting means. In so doing, I must needs use words, and that takes away any simulacrum of reality.

MR: But let us still talk about what you ostensibly say your paintings are about, even as you have now admitted that words fail you.

EM: They do fail me, but they do not fail my art.

MR: Why not?

EM: Because my art expresses itself in a non-verbal form.

MR: But when someone wants to talk about how your art has affected them, they use language.

EM: They are affected by my art in ways they can not express.

MR: Then how can they know how they have been affected, if they can not express it in the only way they have?

EM: You mistake yourself, my friend, if you think that language is the only way we can express ourselves.

MR: Well then, let me put it this way, using language, speaking, to someone who can understand that language is the best way we have of expressing ourselves.

EM: Again, you are mistaken, my friend.

MR: How so? What other way is there of communicating?

EM: I am surprised you can ask such a question when you use ways other than language to communicate most of the time.

MR: What other way?

EM: The non-verbal way.

MR: Which is?

EM: Let me ask you a question; how does a mother communicate her love for her newly born child? That child is not yet able to understand one syllable of the language her mother speaks, and yet the child understands that it is loved by its mother. Is that not a fact?

MR: Certainly.

EM: Then how is that? How has the mother communicated her love?

MR: By the things she does, I suppose.

EM: You may say by the things she does, and the manner in which she does them, do not you think?
MR: By her smiling at the child when she feeds her, you mean?

EM: That is certainly one way in the myriad of ways a loving mother communicates her love for her child.

MR: But there are others.

EM: Many others, and there is one way in particular.

MR: Which is?

EM: Which is her way of being.

MR: Being what? You will have to elaborate.

EM: I thought I might. Let us say that she expresses herself through everything she does, and everything she does is an expression of her love for her child. Can you not see the truth of that?

MR: I can, yes, but how does the child understand what is being communicated?

EM: By being her child, again, by being.

The mother conveys her love for her child in everything she does, and the child understands that she is beloved even if she can not say that word, 'love' or understand what it is.

MR: But what has this got to do with how your art affects me?

EM: Because it expresses itself by being.

MR: Again, you will have to elaborate.

EM: Bear with me, my friend. You stand before my painting, 'The Scream' and you look at it for some time. You can not be but affected by it.

MR: But I might not be able to say how it has affected me.

EM: That is most probably true, but it has affected you.

MR: How, if I can not say how?

EM: Remember the child looking up at her mother; she knows she is loved, even though she can not say so in words.

MR: So what you are saying, are you not, is that words – language – is not enough.

EM: It is n ever enough. The ways my painting have affected you go too deep for words. You can not find the words to express how you have been affected.

MR: Then how do I know I have been affected by your work?

EM: Because you are human, from a broadly similar culture and of a similar age. How can you not be affected?

MR: But I ask again: how can I know, how can I relate it?

EM: You can not, not really. But your desire to tell others has nothing to do with my art, and everything to do with the fact that you are a social being, you need to tell, to express your feelings to others.

MR: But you have said that I can not, that I have not words to help me.

EM: That is true, you have not. What you have is your ability to be.

MR: So my need to talk about how your art has affected me is purely a product of my culture, is it?

EM: Yes, it is, and your language. First, you have lived in this industrial age of ours, and all you have been taught in the course of your life is that everything of value should be capable of being quantified, put down in words or spoken about to others.

MR: But that is normal, is not it, to have that need?

EM: It is for you, and for me, but for the being you really are, your soul, it is not necessary. In fact, I would go further and say that your propensity to want quantify and elucidate has led us to the impasse we find ourselves at.

MR: What impasse?

EM: The impasse we have come to that has brought us through wars, through all kinds of violence, through hatred and prejudice – that impasse.

MR: And you think it is language that has bought us to it, do you?

EM: Language, certainly, and its properties within us.

MR: Which properties?

EM: Those that come with language – faith in words, and a loss of faith in ourselves as human beings. Everything we say and do proclaims it; everything except art, that is.

MR: So you think art expresses itself in a sort of way that is prior to our attaining or acquiring language, do you?

EM: I most certainly do.

MR: But why, how?

EM: Because we enter a world of images, not of language. We are born without language, are we not?

MR: Yes, but we soon learn how to speak, do not we?

EM: We do, and in so doing, we are being inculcated into a civilization and its ways, its social mores – we are learning much more than language. We are learning how to be, and what to be.

MR: And so you think art, your art, speaks to a sort of me that is pre-lingual, if I can say such a thing.

EM: All art does so. It communicates to you in elementary ways that go beyond words, but it communicates to you suddenless. And, sincemore, because it communicates in a non-verbal sense, it acts more deeply upon you than it would have it to be merely a form of verbal language.

MR: But what of art that uses language? What of a Shakespeare play? Does not Hamlet speak to us who watch and listen?

EM: It does, most certainly, but it does so in ways that are different from those ways though which visual art expresses itself.

MR: But it is no less art for that, I think.

EM: No less art, no, it is a different form of art; it is a way that is more culture specific, as it is language specific.

MR: But surely those failures shown to us in plays such as Hamlet, Othello, and King Lear – those are not specifically culturally specific ways of behaving, are they? They are quite universal. Is not jealousy a universal emotion?

EM: We have come to think it is, but I think you will find it too is a product of who we are and what we are.

MR: But I hope you are not saying that there are people who feel no jealousy. I can not believe that.

EM: And nor can I. What I am saying is that in our culture, we have made jealousy functional, or say it has become so because of the utility society gains from it.

MR: What utility?

EM: Jealousy is a part of desire, is it not?

MR: A part, yes, but a perverse part, surely?

EM: We have reinvented it in to control it, but it has its part to play in the way we live, I think you will agree.

MR: What part can it play?

EM: My dear friend, we live in a world in which the Earth and its treasures are unequally divided. Can you not see that we were not to have this propensity to be jealous, the world of commerce and trade would not turn have so smoothly or so quickly as it does?

MR: But we punish those who become jealous, do not we? Is Othello not mock for his insane jealousy?

EM: He most certainly is, but would be so confused if what he coveted was another king's land or property. Shakespeare shows us the green God jealousy for what it is and how we treat those who use it unwisely. The world is full of stories of those who envy and who acquire; it is only those who behave in such ways that attract moral reprobation that are attacked. In its other forms, it is lauded, is it not?

MR: In what other forms?

EM: Why, in its competitive spirit, by us forever wanting to be what we are not. By us forever wanting to be ambitious; which is no more or less than a socially acceptable form of a kind of jealousy. Watch Shakespeare again, and learn what is acceptable in our society and what is not.

My art makes no such bold challenges to your faith, but challenges you suddenheless, I think.

MR: But what kind of challenges? How can I be challenged if I can not express myself so in language?

EM: The mistake you make is by imagining that the only way to express yourself is through language, or through art.

MR: What other ways are there?

EM: Merely by being. Did Gandhi say, 'Be the change you want to see in the world!'?

MR: Yes, I believe he did say that.

EM: Well then, being the change you want to see in the world is a way of self expression that does not rely only on words, but on being.

MR: How can I change who I am?

EM: Do you know who you are? Do you know what you are?

MR: I should hope so.

EM: There you are again hoping. Do not hope – be! Any change that comes to the way we liv our lives will not come merely by hopping it does, do not you agree?

MR: Well, I think we must start by hopping.

EM: I can not agree. Hoping is idealizing, whereas needs to happen is more practical. Change needs to begin, rather than be hoped for. If you hope for something, you are doing something more or less akin to wanting someone to begin. Being the change is starting the change, and if change is to happen, it has to begin somewhere, do not you agree?

MR: Yes, I suppose it must start somewhere. It's just that I always imagine it starting somewhere else and then taking hold and spreading like wildfire.

EM: But if it must start somewhere, why not with you?

MR: Because I am only one person.

EM: But one person can be a symbol for the whole world of people, can it not? What happens to you happens to millions of others, does it not? You are exploited by greed – your own greed and the greed of others, are you not?

MR: It is hard to say I am exploited by myself. We usually think we are exploited by others, do not we.

EM: Yes, we do, and that is our first error in thinking about change. Someone is doing something to us, yes, but really, our systems are so pervasive, so omnipotent, so real in our minds that we take on their values, make them our own, internalize them and then identify with them.

Being the change you want to see is to look at everything you do and ask yourself if you are doing it voluntarily, really voluntarily, or are you acting out of motives that are not your own, are motivated foisted upon you by the status quo.

When you act, are you acting in an original sense, or are you merely copying? That is why my art is so important to me, and why all art is so important to the world of people, because it signifies a person acting originally and creatively.

What is creativity but a way of acting originally, of having possibly non-original thoughts coalesce in ways that are absolutely original to you. When you create, you become original, you stand alone and you stand out.

If you want a change, you must want to be it, surely. You must really want it, for if you do not really want it, it probably means it is not of you and you are not of it. Being the change is the change being you, which is nothing more than being creative with your whole being.

If you can do that, you can certainly escape from the shackles that bind you. They may be invisible, but they are no less real for that. You must be yourself in a real way in order to become the change. Can you see that?

MR: I think so. You are saying that I am a product of my time and the way I am required to be, are not you?

EM: Yes, I am. Even that realization is substantial. We hardly ever come to that point. We should, if we look at what we do, examine everything we do and say, even everything we think.

MR: Do you really think it is necessary to examine our thought? Surely those are our own, are not they?

EM: You think so. Think about anything g you care to think about and you will find it has the stamp, even the seal of approval from those interests that would have you act in ways beneficial to them.

You can not help thinking in those ways, I think, but you can and must become aware of them and once you are aware then you can alter them, you can alter your way of habitually thinking about yourself.

Tat is the first real step to changing; becoming aware of the source of your thoughts.

MR: I think you must have become aware of who you are and what you think, and why you think in the ways you do.

EM: Why do you think that?

MR: Because you can express yourself through your art, which is yours and yours alone.

EM: But are you saying that everything is painted expresses originality?

MR: Yes, I suppose I am.

EM: A lot of art is done to sell, selling it being the way success is apportioned and considered, and in targeting a buyer or a market of buyers, the artist fails in what it does, fails in being original, fails in expressing something in a way that is unique to him. Real art expresses only the artist who created it. If it expresses anything else, it is either thought to do by those who look at the art, who judge it art.

Art should express something that can not be expressed in any other way, should it not? We have already agreed that it can not be expressed in words, that words fail utterly and miserably. Art is that which can not express itself in any other way, is it not?

MR: Yes, I think it is.

EM: Then if it is so, it must be original, must it not, and to be truly original is to be truly creative. The be creative is to change something within oneself, to express an idea that does not copy other ideas but rather synthesizes from existing ones.

There are those who say that any text has meaning only in reference to other texts. While that is unduly true of words in texts, it is not necessarily true of visual art, or at least let me say it is not true of any art that comes from the non-verbal, and expresses itself and its artist in ways that can not be hijacked by any authority higher than the individual.

To be the change you want to see, be that individual, thinking in ways that are not a part of a text elsewhere, and in ways that do not have meaning except in reference to other texts or other meanings. Let those meanings be yours alone, not expressed by language – that way quickly and easily becomes tainted by other, 'superior' texts, which are not your own but are those put there by others. Be the change you want to see by giving meaning to your own self rather than merely standing as a mirror for those meanings that originate elsewhere. Be yourself, in a real sense, rather than in a way that is sanctioned and approved by others. That is the test of art, if anything is, art is so by virtue of it not having a meaning other than the original one given to it at its point of creation. As the first stroke of the brush is contemplated, that is the point at which creativity begins. It is not dependent upon language, and potentially can not take its meaning from other language – texts, for in those other texts that reside the control others have over you.

MR: What I must do then, is to be creative, original?

EM: Yes, after all, there are only certain ways of being individual.

MR: And those are?

EM: Well, the shadow you cast is yours and yours alone, is it not?

MR: Surely, yes.

EM: What about the sight of the sun as it sets, throwing its light across a stretch of water, a lake, let us say.

MR: Anyone may see that. How does that signify anything original in anyone?

EM: Think about it. You stand at the edge of a sheet of water, a lake, and watch the sun setting in the west. Is the light thrown across the water to your feet, not yours and yours alone?

MR: Why is it mine and mine alone? Surely anyone standing next to will see the same shaft of sunlight, will they not?

EM: Again, I would ask you to think about it. Will they see the same or will they see the sunlight reflected in their particular direction, or in yours?

MR: I see what you mean. They will see it in their particular direction, of course.

EM: But in both cases, with the shadow and the shaft of sunlight, it is the sun allotting you a portion of individuality, is it not?

MR: Yes, it is.

EM: Whereas when you create something new, it is yours and yours alone, is it not?

MR: Yes it is.

EM: Being creative is the only way I know of being truly creative.

MR: And so we must strive to be creative, then, if we would be considered as individuals rather than merely one of the herd?

EM: Yes, I think we must. Someone once said that life without examination is not worthy of the name. To be truly alive, we must strive to create, and sometimes then we may solve a lot of our problems, and in so doing, solve others' problems, even the planet's, which are quite our own, though we do not consider them our own most of the time.

MR: I now see what you mean about being the change you want to see in the world.

There Is No Best, Only Better!

White walls, white windows and white corridors. Now we need something to light up our dream house. Oil painting, as an essential decorative item, lives in many people's homes and many people's hearts. But not all the people are familiar with decorating with oil painting. Or we may even say only a few of them…

White walls, white windows and white corridors. Now we need something to light up our dream house. Oil painting, as an essential decorative item, lives in many people's homes and many people's hearts. But not all the people are familiar with decorating with oil painting. Or we may even say only a few of them know how to use it. To popularize, here we summarize three hints of how to choose the most appropriate oil painting to decorate your houses. Keeping in mind, there is no best choice, only better selection.

Firstly you have to consider what style of your house really is. It's very awkward to match a cartoon-style painting to a house of cool style; and it's uncomfortable to match a Chinese-style painting to a house of Western style. Beside, never buy a painting just because the salesman told you it was famous or unusual. It's not often your guests come to visit your house, but it's always you have to live in it. So your own feeling is the first factor which decides the main genre of painting.

After that, it's time for you to make sure how large you need the painting is. There's no doubt that for the landscape painting the larger the nicer it looks. But do you need a painting which covers 40% or more of the wall? Do not you worry that your guests will often be distracted from your face but keep staring at the painting when you are chatting? Never forget that its function is only for decoration. It can help light up your colorless house, but it can not be a reversal of the order of host and guest.

Lastly, be careful to pick the subject of the oil painting . Different rooms have different functions. Sitting room is for welcoming your friends; dining room is for enjoying food; bedroom is for having a good sleep; and study is for reading book quietly. According to their relevant characteristics, we may match a warm-colored painting to the sitting room, put a colorful painting which can wake up your appetite in the dining room, hang a cold tune painting on the wall of the bedroom and choose a peaceful painting for the study.

To summarize, considering the house style, choosing the right size of the painting and picking the appropriate subject of the artwork are three main issues when selecting oil painting to decorate your house. These three main issues can not make you professional enough but can keep you away from those embarrassing moments. Just keep in mind that there is no best only better. You will find lots of fun in it.

Madhubani Paintings – The True Example of Traditional Art

Madhubani paintings are very popular art all over the world for their liveliness and style. This art is mostly practiced in Bihar, Nepal and Terai. The specialty of this painting is that, it is done with brushes, fingers, nib-pens, match sticks and twigs by using the natural pigments and dyes. These painting style indicates the…

Madhubani paintings are very popular art all over the world for their liveliness and style. This art is mostly practiced in Bihar, Nepal and Terai. The specialty of this painting is that, it is done with brushes, fingers, nib-pens, match sticks and twigs by using the natural pigments and dyes. These painting style indicates the festivals such as Holi and occasions such as marriage, birth, Upanayanam, Kali Puja, Surya Sasti and other puja. As this painting form derives roots from Mithila this art has taken up the name of mithila painting as a synonym.

Why are Madhubani paintings popular?

Madhubani painting designs look quite interesting. However, Mithila art can be done at home by following some simple tips. Madhubani literally indicates the honey-forest. However, the Madubani artists place their art on cloth and paper these days for commercial purposes. In general, the common designs and themes that you will commonly find an example of Madhubani Art are the depictions of Rama, Durga, Krishna, Siva, Saraswati, Moon, Sun, Wedding scenes, court scenes, Tulsi plant and the like. This art is handed down to every generation by their parents and this is the reason why the artists still follow traditional methods for practicing this art. These artists most definitely use traditional patterns or designs in their art.

This form of art comes under the Indian folk art. No doubt, the essence of using bamboo sticks wrapped with cotton that are used as painting brush, reflect in the nuances of the painting. Another unique feature of this painting is that Madhubani artists prepare their own colors. In general, they prepare black color by mixing the cow dung and soot! Beside, the yellow color comes to be by mixing water with turmeric; while blue color is derived from indigo. They will use the Palasha flowers to obtain the Orange color. These folk art paintings can also be labeled eco-friendly and green art.

These madhubani paintings are in high demand all over the world. These are economic options too. Moreover, with advancement in technology, online shopping has come into popularity these days. You can purchase these paintings via online portals too if you desire finding the best paintings at low prices. Beside, there are also some websites that are offer online Madhubani art training too. You can undergo such training for making a career in Madhubani Art or simply to cultivate the art of painting – Madhubani style.

Art and Craft From Ladakh and Leh in India

Leh is the second largest Indian district area wise. It is situated in Ladakh, one of the three regions in the state of Jammu and Kashmir. In the early days, Leh used to be a stopover on the trade route between India and China. Most of the city is about mountains and lakes. Its climate…

Leh is the second largest Indian district area wise. It is situated in Ladakh, one of the three regions in the state of Jammu and Kashmir. In the early days, Leh used to be a stopover on the trade route between India and China. Most of the city is about mountains and lakes. Its climate is like that of a cold desert with the extreme winter season between October and March. The main tourist attraction in Leh is Trekking and the historical palaces, the Japanese and the Tibetans built.

Art and Craft of Leh

Most of the Ladakhi artifacts were imported from other places. The whole region adopted them as a part of its culture. Here are some most popular handicrafts of Ladakh and Leh.

  • Metal Crafts

In the early seventeenth century, some metal artisans were brought in from Nepal to construct a large Buddhist Temple in Leh. Since then, most of them stayed back. Their descendants continue to live and make metal artifacts here. They use silver, copper, and brass to carve out exquisite pieces for religious and domestic purposes. They also shape up beautiful teapots, teacups, stands, hookah stands, ladles, bowls, and silver chorten (a mound like shape) for use in temples and shrines. These artists depend on local blacksmiths called garas to make cheaper vessels and pots (for daily use) and agricultural equipment. The garas also make ornamental iron stoves. You can see them in most well to do houses in Leh.

  • Woven Cloth Crafts

Another popular art form in Ladakh is hand-spun woolen clothing. Pashmina (a fine variety of Cashmere wool) shawls are a specialty from Srinagar. Weavers in Leh also make them. However, they are not as soft as those from Srinagar are. Similarly, you can buy the Tibetan style of carpets from the Tibetan Refugee Center in Leh.

  • Stick Baskets

Handmade baskets of willow twigs and a particular type of grass, are very common in Ladakh. The locals use these to carry vegetables, fruits, and even babies.

  • Wood Carving

Ladakhis use carved pillows and low tables for domestic use. You can spot these in most houses in Leh.

  • Paintings

Tangka Painting is another specialty of Ladakhi art forms. The painters mostly use embroidered silk cloth to enhance durability. You can roll the light painted cloth for a convenient storage and portability. The monks mostly use these paintings as a teaching tool. In addition, commoners and monks paint the murals in the gompas (Buddhist mysteries). These murals describe the various aspects of Buddhism.

Buying Ladakhi Handicrafts

You can buy the artifacts and handicraft items from the District Handicrafts Center at Leh. The organization trains the locals in traditional art and craft forms to keep the rich Ladakhi art and culture, alive. It even helps to market their products through sale depots and exhibitions. The Center targets tourists from all parts of the world.

Madhubani Painting – The Color Significance of a Hindu Wedding Scene

Importance of Colors Colors are integral to our being, as we associate them with the states of our mind & / or body. Interestingly, these associations are more or less universally acknowledged. Each color is ascribed unique traits in the realms of positive and negative. Despite our different backgrounds, we agree with an uncanny like-mindedness…

Importance of Colors

Colors are integral to our being, as we associate them with the states of our mind & / or body. Interestingly, these associations are more or less universally acknowledged. Each color is ascribed unique traits in the realms of positive and negative. Despite our different backgrounds, we agree with an uncanny like-mindedness on the language of colors!

Colors in Art

If we explore deeper, the core concept of colors lies in the vibrant spectrums of nature. Human beings simulated these colors to create objects for pleasing the senses. Different cultures adopted and depicted colors according to their understanding. In effect, one color had different proposition in different cultures & religions. Hinduism also attaches a certain connotation to different colors and so do most of the Indian art forms. The vivid & bright colors of Madhubani Paintings represent the emotional levels beyond the sketching.

Colors of Hinduism & Madhubani

The 100% eco-friendly art form Madhubani or Mithila Painting of Bihar (Eastern Indian state) belongs to the Mithila region. Different objects (twigs, brushes, fingers, & matchsticks) from the daily life are used to color the patterns. The hues used are 100% organic dyes, inks, & pigments. Rice paste is used to make these paintings and the canvas usually paper or cloth.

The History of Madhubani

Madhubani Painting is believed to have originated in the age of Ramayana. Sita, the daughter of Mithila King Janak, was to be wedded to Lord Rama. The King ordered the women of his kingdom to paint designs on the walls and floors of their homes. The paintings done in bright, vibrant colors were them to depict happiness, life, birth, beauty, peace, and all the elements of life worth celebrating! That was the joyful sunset of Madhubani Painting.

The Colors of Madhubani

It is simply astounding how through vivid colors, Madhubani paintings portray a wide range of activities, personalities, or monochrome patterns. The subjects of these art forms include but are not limited to the scenes from simple domestic chores, lavish celebrations; figures of mere mortals, animals, birds, or Gods; nature; and / or floral or geometric patterns. The hues used radiate positivity and high aesthetics to invariably please the creative senses.

Wedding Scene – The Symbolism

The most popular Madhubani subject is the Garland ceremony of a Hindu wedding in front of a tree. While the Jai Mala or the garland exchange symbolizes union and continuity, the tree denotes life and vitality. Therefore, all the elements seem to be blessing the couple.

Wedding Scene – The Color Symbolism

Although we can find almost all possible colors in the painting, Green dominates at the first glance. Leaves & dresses of the bride & the groom are hued in it. Symbolizing nature, Green signifies freshness, health, peace, renewal, spring, fertility, and good luck. The other colors that catch the eye are Red, Yellow, and Brown. Red stands for passion, power, energy, & strength; yellow symbolizes sunshine, joy, optimism, & hope; while brown is for earth, stability, hearth, home, endurance, and simplicity. In effect, the wedding scene of a Madhubani Painting beautifully depicts hopes, wishes, and blessings. Precisely what King Janak would have wanted for his daughter Sita, or any parent wishes for his / her child!

Important Face Painting Tips for Newbies

Face painting is such an enjoyable activity, not just for kids, or teens, but for adults as well. Aside from the fun experience it bestows, it can actually be a very prosperous business, but you must remember that on whatever level you want to involve yourself in, that all the safety and health measures must…

Face painting is such an enjoyable activity, not just for kids, or teens, but for adults as well. Aside from the fun experience it bestows, it can actually be a very prosperous business, but you must remember that on whatever level you want to involve yourself in, that all the safety and health measures must be understood and practiced.

Many believe that what promises challenging must be difficult to start. (At least in your mind). But if you dare to start, you will realize that face painting is not as difficult as you thought. We will give you some tips on how to kick off. The first thing that you must understand is to start with something basic and simple like a white cat with whiskers. Going for a design that is simple and uses few colors will give you confidence to then try more. Little by little you will add form and colors that will give depth and detail to what you have started on. And as you continue to enjoy painting, step-by-step, you can make your art expression more detailed and refined.

But before going father, let us talk about the materials that we are going to use.

1. Face Paint – Be very careful of the paint you are going to paint with, especially as our “clients” will mostly be kids! Make sure the face paint is for the skin and is non-toxic and safe and is accordance with the standard of American, European and other countries regulations. Also, keep in mind that acrylic paints are not safe to be applied on your skin. It is not advisable to use watercolour or markers or pencils on skin for face painting. So the key to success is to use the right products and also to know if the person you are going to face paint has any skin allergies.

2. Brushes & Sponges to be used – Brushes and sponges dictate how the paint will be applied on the face. So take note, paint brushes must be of the best quality. You may use a minimum of two (2) brushes and 1 sponge to begin with. A small and fine pointed brush will be needed for detailed paint works. Secondly, you will need a medium-sized smoother pointed paintbrush to be used for the bolder strokes. Lastly, a sponge will help you to cover larger areas of the skin. I will give details of brushes and sponges in another chapter.

3. Designing what you are going to paint – Before painting on the face try drawing a picture of what you want to paint. Best of all try the design by drawing it on a drawing of a face. Try and imagine where the lines will be applied and how you will transfer this on to a 3D form. Ask yourself what details will bring out the best of the idea? What makes a cat say, look like a cat?

4. Painting – Face paints are water-based and will easily come off with some water. You will need water in a jar and a water spray to load the paint onto your brush / sponge. Be sure to wet the brush / sponge even before loading a color. This will mean an even coat of paint that will come onto the skin. The water spray is used to spray directly onto the paint to make it wet since face paints are generally dry pastes. Try and use your brushes and sponges to apply the paint with some gentleness so you can add more and not waste time taking it off. You also have to consider drying time for the paint before adding another color on top. If you only have a small amount of paint brushes be sure to wash the brush well before loading another color as not to mix the colors up.

5. After you have completed you face paint design be sure to clean well all your brushes and sponges so they keep their quality and form. There are products to also help bring a rough looking brush back to its straight former self. Face painting is a very rewarding and relaxing activity and it brings such happy smiles to the painted. Enjoy the learning process and remember practice makes perfect! Happy face painting people!

Warli Paintings: The Incredible and Expressive Tribal Art

India has a fertile background of painting. Right from tribal to rural to urban manifestations, it has achieved magnificence in all forms. One such style is the Warli painting, which has a distinguished tangent. Belonging to the Warli tribes of Maharashtra-Gujarat border region, this painting style is amazingly simple and well touches the artistic aesthetics.…

India has a fertile background of painting. Right from tribal to rural to urban manifestations, it has achieved magnificence in all forms. One such style is the Warli painting, which has a distinguished tangent. Belonging to the Warli tribes of Maharashtra-Gujarat border region, this painting style is amazingly simple and well touches the artistic aesthetics. With tribes adopting some degree of civilized lifestyle, Warli is often termed as folk painting as well. Its themes also alter accordingly.

History of Warli Paintings

There are no authentic records endorsing the origin of this great folk art, but experts date it back to at least 10th century. Interestingly enough, this art form remained hidden until the 1970's, when a few enthusiastic and passionate art lovers discovered it. Living predominately in the Thane district of Maharashtra, the tribe, through its paintings, highlights intensely close association with the lifestyle and the people in their community.

Themes and Style

Monochrome, innocence, and simplicity are the three foundational wells of Warli painting. The strokes are bold and the images are basic geometric figures (mainly circles & triangles) with an astonishing absence of straight line. Series of dots substitute it capably!

Relating greatly to the pre-historic cave paintings, the themes are more about daily chores and the key events of common people, such as socio-religious aspects – customs & traditions. While celebration is central to Warli art, sowing & harvesting are also the merment here. Marriage rituals, marriage God, and horse appear frequently. Birds, trees, flowers, and nature; Warli has a wholesome expanse.

Medium

Being an authentic, undiluted tribal art, the medium has never been a constraint for Warli paintings. A nicely prepared smooth floor, a flat piece of wood, utensils and / or mainly a rough surface of a stone or a mud wall; anything can be the canvas.

Use of methyl colors (usually white with very infrequent appearance of other colors) on a muddy back help retain the authentic tribal touch of Warli paintings. However, contemporary artists are experimenting a lot with colors & strokes. These new versions of Warli are also fast gaining popularity.

Warli Handicrafts

Warli paintings are much visible as wall paintings, murals, decorative items (showpieces & table pieces), utensils, and upholstery (curtains, cushion covers, bed sheets, table covers, etc.)

Warli painting is unduly a superb alluring form of folklore. This, women dominated painting style has undergone great transformations and is now in high demand across the globe. And rightly so.

Abstract Art Is Great for Beginners – Part 1

Give a child a box of paintings and a paintbrush and something amazing will happen. Even if it is the first time they have painted you will see a picture of the world appear right before your eyes. there will be fantastic locations populated with people and animals depicted in unusual bright colors. However, as…

Give a child a box of paintings and a paintbrush and something amazing will happen. Even if it is the first time they have painted you will see a picture of the world appear right before your eyes. there will be fantastic locations populated with people and animals depicted in unusual bright colors.

However, as an adult artist beginner, if you were to produce something similar you would feel shocked to see the result. It would not matter if you had not been anywhere close to anything remotely resembling an easel or canvas, you would be left feeling disappointed.

“Why is that so?”

A child has little painting experience to fall back upon. And, as a newbie, you are unquestionably to have a great deal of familiarity with the tools of art. In truth, if you are a beginner interested in representational art, it is highly unquestionably that you will be able to create paintings that look convincingly realistic.

Surely this should come as no great surprise …

“Both the children and yourself share the same lack of art knowledge and painting and drawing skills”

Fortunately, this fact does not limit children from producing wonderful paintings. They do not worry, instead they just carry on regardless.

Similarly, understanding your shortcomings and shortcomings should not prevent you from producing your own works of magic. Rather than focusing on what you do not know and feel you can not do, does not it make more sense to just do your best?

Here is what you share with kids …

“Imagination!”

Now, taking a slightly different view of your inadequacies, when you pick up a pencil to draw you could view the results as an impression of what you see. It might not be a perfect representation but it will show what you think and feel.

If your first attempt at painting looks similar to the watercolor shown here you do not have to irritated by your difficulties in making the colors do exactly what you want. Instead, you could just sit back and appreciate how incredible it is that simple color pigments mixed with water can combine together on the paper surface, often leaving far better results than if you managed to force your intentions.

If you have been left feeling frustrated by your drawing and painting efforts there is one question you might ask – “Is it abstract?”

  • You could view your drawings as abstract sketches preparing for something greater.
  • Your pleasant abstract paintings might be viewed as preparations for ambitious future masterpieces.

Considering your artistic efforts as developments leading to, as yet unknown futures, may lead you towards your representational aspirations. Alternately, you may realize that your impressive abilities are best suited to exploring and expanding the limits of your abstract art.

  1. It could be that you have an exceptional imagination
  2. Possibly you want to show your ideas as drawings and paintings
  3. Maybe you are inspired by situations and events in the world around you
  4. It might be possible that you want to show someone how you feel about them with a portrait

This is all great if your artistic talents are matched by your drawing and painting abilities.

  • But, what if you can not paint and draw to the standards required?
  • Does this mean you can not produce art that reflects what you feel and think?
  • Or could it be that you can draw and paint abstract artwork of even greater value?

That is the reason why the offers below were produced to help you take maximum advantage of your own unique abilities, even if you do not know what they are yet.

Only you can tell and only you can show what you feel in your art as you learn to paint and draw – whether it is abstract or representative …

“What is stopping you from creating your own amazing art?”

Choosing the Correct Brush for Effective Painting

There are many different styles and types of brushes to choose from. The most common you will find are: round, flat, bright, filbert, fan, mop, and rigger. Alongside the differences in shape and size, some brushes can consist of natural or synthetic fibers and some brushes contain a combination of both. FLAT brushes are more…

There are many different styles and types of brushes to choose from. The most common you will find are: round, flat, bright, filbert, fan, mop, and rigger. Alongside the differences in shape and size, some brushes can consist of natural or synthetic fibers and some brushes contain a combination of both.

FLAT brushes are more rectangular in shape, longer than the ferrule to its tip than it is wide. I find this brush the most resourceful of all brushes and often use it to drop in larger blocks of color. With it flat you can create wide strokes, on its side thinner lines.

BRIGHT brushes are similar to flat but the hairs are shorter and the side view is thinner. The bristles also tend to be stiffer because of the shorter length of the hairs. This brush will show brush stroke marks in the paint. Be warned with this brush it is easy to lift up the paint from the canvas that you just applied. This brush takes a little practice to use effectively (so try not to be frustrated).

FILBERT brushes are flats that the corners have been rounded. The shape is oval- shaped or convex. I use this to create a blended or softer edge.

FAN brushes have a thin layer of bristles spread (fan) out by the ferrule. These are most commonly used to blend colors. But these are also perfect to create realistic grasses and strands of hair. Just remember to vary the strokes to create more of a natural effect.

ROUNDS in generally are less versatile than most other brush styles. The hairs are all the same length. These are best used for small detailed painting.

MOP brush are brushes that always reminds me of a make-up brush it is usually used for watercolor, because it will hold a very larger amount of paint and is good to drop in washes for backgrounds. The brush is soft and very flexible.

RIGGER brush (line Brush) are thin pointy brushes with extremely long bristles. These are perfect for creating thin lines with a consistent width. They are great to use for thin tree branches and lettering.

This is just a guideline to explain how these brushed are used, but in no way the only explanation. Explore and see how the brushes inform your paintings. Even though I own several of each brushes. I have my favorites that I will always fall back on.

Explore, create, enjoy!

7 Essential Elements in An Iconic Band Logo

For any rock band seeking success, an iconic and unique logo holds the key to whatever they will succeed or not. In the world of rock music, packaging is very brutal and one of the best ways to package your music is through your image, the image that you portray to the fans. Rock n…

For any rock band seeking success, an iconic and unique logo holds the key to whatever they will succeed or not. In the world of rock music, packaging is very brutal and one of the best ways to package your music is through your image, the image that you portray to the fans. Rock n roll by nature is showy and every band tries its level best to get a logo that will easily easily recognizable and portray their identity. Band logos are also important for merchandising, putting on drum heads, and for tattoos by fans.

Band logos played a big role in the success of some of the major rock bands around the 1970s and 80s. Heavy metal bands of the 70s and 80s put much emphasis on logos and this paid off. The 70s and 80s heavy metal bands had some of the most iconic band logos that fans still remember up to date. Rock bands like AC-DC, the Beetles, Metallica, Black Sabbath, Black Label Society, white zombie, DIO, Black flag, the rolling stones, ministry, the Addicts Just to mention a few, that's the iconic logos, logos that became very visible on t-shirts, caps, shirts among other materials. For modern day rock bands trying to create iconic band logos like those of the 70s and 80s, here are the 7 essential elements in an iconic band logo.

1. Simplicity . A good logo needs not to be complex or very flashy. One thing to put in mind is that less is more so focus on coming up with designs that are simply and easy to identify regardless of what format it appears. Simplicity in this case means keeping the band logo clear with very simple lines and avoid stuffing too much to the logo. Ensure that the fonts are simple and easy to read. By looking at logos of some of the most successful heavy metal bands of the 70s like AC-DC, the rolling stones, the Beetles, ABBA, you can get an idea of ​​what we mean when we talk of simplicity.

2. Uniqueness and Originality . Before coming up with a band logo, try to come with something as unique as possible as the essence behind making a band logo is to make you stand out from other bands. Brainstorming among the different members of the band may help you to come up with something unique, something never seen before. A unique logo means the band will be easily identifiable by the logo and will not be confused with other bands. Try to use symbols and styles that have never been used before.

3. Versatility . Try to come up with a logo that is appealing to the eye both in colored and black and white. The band logo should not lose appeal when printed in reverse colors or in other styles. For a band logo to be iconic and capture the attention of fans, it must be appealing in all formats in which it appears.

4. Relevance . The band logo should reflect the rock star image and should be represent the feelings of the band members. Try to come up with a logo that relates to the name of the band and directories the true rock mentality. Putting relevant and eye catching images in your logo will also help to make it iconic.

5. Scalability . Make a logo that will look tick and iconic regardless of where it is placed or the size. Make a band logo that will still be visible and less complicated even when made smaller. The logo should also look great not just on the web but even when printed on any surface, be it a cap or just in form of a tattoo.

6. Timeless . The best band logos normally stand the test of time. Logos for bands like the AC-DC, ABBA, Rolling stones, and the beetles are some of the logos that have stood the test of time and are still recognizable even up to today. Try to come up with good designs that will leave a long lasting impression on the fans.

7. Memorable . Finally, try to come up with a band logo that will leave a long lasting impression on the fans. Come up with a simple, beautiful and easy to remember logo that will stand out from the rest.

The above are some of the 7 essential elements that will guide you in making an iconic band logo, one that will leave a long lasting impression on the fans.

Mona Lisa: The Finest Of Da Vinci’s Masterpieces

The name of Leonardo Da Vinci has been synonymous to one painting and that is the Mona Lisa. Although he has been hailed to be a great mind of his stature and was credited for some of the greatest inventions in the modern world, most of us would certainly agree that there's no better work…

The name of Leonardo Da Vinci has been synonymous to one painting and that is the Mona Lisa. Although he has been hailed to be a great mind of his stature and was credited for some of the greatest inventions in the modern world, most of us would certainly agree that there's no better work that could represent him other than this popular painting. But how come this painting is so reverted compared to his other accomplishments? What makes the Mona Lisa so valuable to all of us? In this article, we are going to talk about the Mona Lisa painting which is a very famous and mysterious artwork done by one of the brilliant minds that ever walked the earth.

This article is created to know more details about the painting as well as examining some facts and fiction about the much debated Da Vinci's artwork.

Overview Of Mona Lisa:

The Mona Lisa painting is one of the most recognizable works in the whole history of art. The title of the painting was derived from the Italian word “Ma Donna” which means 'my lady', then it was ever changed into “Mona” which has the same meaning as the previous address. So the title of “Mona Lisa” simply means 'My lady Lisa' or 'Madam Lisa'. This art is believed to be portrait of Lisa Gherardini, who was the wife of Francesco del Giocondo. Da Vinci was commissioned by del Giocondo to make a portrait of his wife some time during the age of the Italian Renaissance as a decor and to commemorate the arrival of another child in the family. Leonardo started working on this painting on 1503 and set it after after 4 years. He then moved to France when the King Francis 1 invited him. He resumed working on the painting in 1516 which took him another 3 years to finish it. The mastery of this painting depicts the fine detail, the fault and ambiguous smile, and the distinct gaze which brings an element of mystery.

In 1911, the painting was stolen in the Salon Carre. The museum was closed for one week and the names of Guillaume Apollinaire and Pablo Picasso turned out to be the alleged culprit of the theft. Their names were eventually cleared after careful investigation. The painting was then found 2 years later when it was retrieved from Vicenzo Peruggia after and attempt to sell it. He got the idea of ​​stealing the Mona Lisa because his friend was selling fake copies of the painting and thought the counterfeit value would increase once the real painting had vanished.

Today, this famous painting is considered to be the most popular, the most talked about, the most replicated, and the most sung about of all the paintings in the world of art.

Some Speculations About The Mona Lisa:

Mona Lisa is often linked to many types of mysteries from its origin down to the details shown in the painting itself:

1. Debate on the theory of origin – Many scholars disagree on the theory that the painting is the portrait of del Giocondo's wife and it may depict other subjects.

2. Self portrait – Scholars and researchers argument the fact that this may not be a portrait of other subject, but this is actually a self portrait of the painter itself. Da Vinci was trying to paint an ideal woman and his is using his facial features to create this masterpiece.

3. A painting full of codes – Some experts believe that the Mona Lisa is painting that's embedded with a lot of codes. They believe that Leonardo did this to tell us some information that he could not open share to anyone during his time.

Conclusion:

The painting of Mona Lisa is truly one of kind extraordinary painting. It may be an artwork that is full of mystery, but it is certainly something that all of us can be proud of.