Carl Larsson, The Swedish Painter – His Early Years

Carl Larsson is known the world over for his beautiful paintings, showing his loving family and the idyllic Swedish country life he and his family lived. The color palette and the light that gives this artist his unique and charming style, made his paintings stand out from the other dark and over-opulence Victorian era that…

Carl Larsson is known the world over for his beautiful paintings, showing his loving family and the idyllic Swedish country life he and his family lived. The color palette and the light that gives this artist his unique and charming style, made his paintings stand out from the other dark and over-opulence Victorian era that rule at that time. When looking at the light and the joyful colors Carl Larsson used in his paintings, it is quite remarkable to find out he had such a dark and unhappy childhood.

Carl Larsson's Difficult Childhood

The painter was born in 1853, into a family of poverty and misery with a father that drank and showed no sympathy or love toward his son, and a mother that worked endlessly long hours as laundress to support the family. As a boy, Carl had to listen to his fathers constant outburst “I curse the day you were born” towards him, that greeted lifelong anger in Carl towards his father.

After some years the parents split up, and the mother with her two children, moved into a slum housing district in Stockholm. The family had to share a small room with two other families. The living quarters were extremely poverty-stricken and the environment was filthy and a breeding ground for cholera and other diseases.

The Academy of Fine Arts

Carl's talent as an artist showed very early in his life. At the age of thirteen, his teacher, recommended him to apply to the Academy of Fine Arts in Stockholm. The boy got admitted, but he did not adjust well and felt both awkward and socially inferior. It was not until some years later, at the age of sixteen, he gained confidence when he got promoted to the “antique school” of the same academy. During his years as a student he also worked hard to support the family with its everyday needs. Carl worked as a graphic artist for the newspaper Ny illustrurad tidning, as well as a caricaturist for the humorous paper Kasper.

Follow the Path to Paris

At the age of twenty-four, Carl left Sweden to follow the same path as so many other aspiring Swedish artists at that time and moved to Paris. However, Carl did not live an easy life. Days, weeks and years of hard work and constant struggle filled the young artist's life without any fortune, luck or recognition.

It was not until 1882, at the age of twenty-nine, Carl Larsson's life should finally take a turn to the better when he met the six-year younger Swedish artist Karin Berg. This was the beginning of a life filled with love, happiness and sheer bliss, that we are so familiar with in Carl Larssons wonderful paintings.

To read more of Sannel's articles, please visit her blog: http://sannellarson.blogspot.se/

Why Do We Buy Art?

It is commonplace to hear people talking about buying art as a financial commitment, but should this be the true reason we buy art? Big auction houses and larger galleries encourage this particular kind of thinking because it will help them to sell art to the upper crust of contemporary society. They treat art more…

It is commonplace to hear people talking about buying art as a financial commitment, but should this be the true reason we buy art? Big auction houses and larger galleries encourage this particular kind of thinking because it will help them to sell art to the upper crust of contemporary society. They treat art more like a investment than what it truly is, which is loveliness to be enjoyed by anyone.

You might be asking yourself why you should buy art. Well, you should only buy art because you love it; because it moves or inspires you and gives you pleasure from looking at it. The primary purpose of a piece of art is to bring joy to those who see it; if you are buying art sole as an investment and do not think you will be displaying it, then consider why you are really looking to buy art if not for the beauty of the piece?

If you are considering buying art as an investment for the future, here are some things to look for that will ensure that you make good choices in the art you buy.

Firstly, make sure the artist is committed to their career. A sign of this is often the pursuit of an art-related degree from a college or an art school, or even a mentorship with a seasoned artist in their specialty. Something to prove that they are serious about their future as an artist. An artist's exhibition history is also a clue of how their career might grow and develop, and also how their work can be expected to appreciate in the near future.

Another thing you can look for is the level of promise an artist shows early on in their art career. It can be more difficult to judge the talent of an artist because it takes an eye for skill and ability, but start with attending the year end shows of local colleges and art schools. If you think you have spotted a real gem among the works you see there, it may be worth the investment to buy a piece from that particular artist, and support them in the coming year as they grow in their skills and talent.

This leads us to the main caveat of caution against the idea that you should buy art as an investment; Unless you find a long-lost Picasso in a thrift shop or someone's garage sale, you are not likely to see a short-term return on your initial investment.

Another thing to consider is that the art market is artificially controlled by the prices that are set by the same galleries and auction houses mentioned earlier in this article. This means that some truly great artists will not appreciate significantly if they do not pander to the galleries, even though the quality of their work may be better. It's not particularly fair, but that is how the traditional art industry operates.

The fact of the matter is, there are more artists and works of art than there are spaces on a gallery wall. This means that the galleries have to be very picky about the works they take in, because they are in the business of making money by representing artists which work will sell quickly. If you want to buy art and avoid the hassle and outrageous prices of galleries and auction houses, read on! A savings of 50% – 60% awaits you!

A new online platform is on the rise, and has recently launched, and it is being designed to allow art buyers and collectors to buy art direct from the artist at 0% commission. Only showcasing art that has been approved and evaluated by the committee in charge of curation, this website ensures that anyone seeking to buy art will have a strictly satisfactory experience while browsing the site. Buy art from the comfort of your own home with ease!

What you should take away from this article is the simple message that art is meant to be enjoyed by everyone, especially those who own it. If you are buying art as an investment, and you happen to make some money off of it, well done! However if you do not, make sure to enjoy the art for what it is and ensure that it at least has value because it is beautiful. Browse art online through virtual galleries and deal with the artist direct!

Canvas Art

Modern Canvas Art A piece of 'modern' canvas art is a painting that pertains to a certain category that generally uses structured lines, geometric designs and color variations on canvas to create art. Typically, there are no standard colors or a standard color palate that is used in modern canvas art, which is actually one…

Modern Canvas Art

A piece of 'modern' canvas art is a painting that pertains to a certain category that generally uses structured lines, geometric designs and color variations on canvas to create art. Typically, there are no standard colors or a standard color palate that is used in modern canvas art, which is actually one of the defining character of the genre. Modern canvas art is incredibly flexible both in substance and in style and can make a bold statement or a more humble one, depending on the artist's intention.

Hand-Painted Canvas Art Vs. Giclee Canvas.

The essential difference between a Giclee canvas work and an original is that a Giclee is a print created on an ink-jet or IRIS printer. They are generally less expensive than an original, but lack the quality texture and feeling of a hand-painted work of modern art. Canvas comes in a variety of textures that can add to any work created on it. When considering almost any piece of modern art, the color, feeling and design is always critical. For a piece of modern canvas art to be truly breathtaking, it must be both simple in design, yet project an air of quality and elegance. A print, whether on paper or canvas will simply not be able to achieve the same level of quality. The best part is that acquiring a quality piece of original modern art does not have to be incredibly expensive. Currently there is a huge range of artists out there that will re-create a popular painting of their heads several times. A great original piece of modern canvas art can range in price from $ 100- $ 3000, so there is something for every price range. Occidentally you will even find that diamond in the rough … an up and coming artist with impeccable talent and taste who is selling their first painting at an inexpensive price. If you can develop a relationship with them early, you will be guaranteed a good price later on when their work's price tag increases. For those who are on a tight budget Giclee is a good way to go. It still adds a great deal of style to any room and has no limits (usually) on size and the style or idea that goes on the canvas. Giclee can be cheaper than an original hand-painted art work. There are many places on the web where you can find Giclee reproductions of famous artist works, while the original can be tiresomely hard to locate.

Adding Dimension to Your Artwork Through Life Experiences

A good piece of art captures the essence of the subject matter as seen through the eye of the artist. A great piece of artwork exposes the inner-workings of the artist and connects to the viewer on a human level. I preface this article by stating that I tend to shy away from writing pieces…

A good piece of art captures the essence of the subject matter as seen through the eye of the artist. A great piece of artwork exposes the inner-workings of the artist and connects to the viewer on a human level.

I preface this article by stating that I tend to shy away from writing pieces that have a personal or emotional connection to me; however, who better to write about the career of an artist that has spanned nearly five decades then someone who has observed it first-hand?

I am speaking about my father, Raymond J. Wattenhofer, Jr. He is the quintessential example of the man who has soaked up everything the world has to offer and in turn captured those experiences on canvas. Judging from the point at which he began his walk through this world, you'd think he'd be the last one to express his observations on life through paintbrush and canvas. And yet, that is the medium he chose to tell his story and, in turn, change the perspective of each person who views his pieces.

Raymond entered adulthood an experienced Midwest rancher and horseman who, by the time he was seventeen, had amassed his own impressive cattle herd and quickly learned the routes to becoming a successful cattleman. The Vietnam War was in full swing and, seeking adventure, he enlisted in the United States Coast Guard, reaching his way onto an elite search and rescue team stationed off the waters of Puerto Rico. The thought of this may stir up adventurous passion in a young man, but there was a dark side: He and his team were responsible for collecting bodies after major conflicts and airline crashes. This experience affected him deeply for years to come and became the critical juncture of his evolution from boy to man … and man to artist.

After the war, he and my mother moved back to the Midwest, at which time he adopted the isolationist lifestyle and evolved further into a self-reliant, hardcore do-it-yourselfer: Raising honey bees, growing his own food, making his own alcohol and even creating paper products from raw materials. This is when the need to express himself through art began to smolder in his belly and soon burst into a full-on inferno of artistic passion.

He tought himself the lost wax process for creating bronze sculptures and, although my family was extremely poor, managed to scratch together the materials to build his own foundry. What followed was a very prolific period of sculpture creation to which he applied his knowledge of animal husbandry and created magnificent pieces that captured the essence of the western horseman and cattle rancher. He even created a useful of life-size and heroic size pieces which are currently displayed around the country.

As his artistic evolution continued it became apparent to insiders that his work was extremely cathartic and, ever so slowly, the darkness in his soul receded. But the deep-rooted angst he had felt for years would not be completely quelled until he bought himself to the next level. One day he woke up and decided it was time to become an oil painter.

Years of frustration followed as he painfully learned the techniques of oil painting that would fully capture the essence of what he strove to convey. But technique is only part of what makes a great painter: You have to be willing to put it all on the line and expose your soul to the world. Until an artist is willing to stand naked and vulnerable before the world he / she will never connect with their viewers. This was the hardest obstacle for Raymond to overcome. He was raised with a “carry your own water” mentality, where real men were strong and silent and never exposed personal weakness.

There is nothing sadder than an artist with great technique but who is unwilling to put themselves into their work: technically profitable pieces, yes. And yet, completely soulless. It takes a great leap of faith to transcend our own fears and say to the world, “This is the real me, warts and all.” You want your viewer to stand and contemplate your work, make them want to see it through your eyes as the real you sees it. If they walk away with a new perspective, seeing the world just a little differently and thenby changed, you have achieved your goal.

Years of blood, sweat and tears have paid off for Raymond. He has achieved what all great artists must achieve to bring their artwork to the next level: Expose your joys, your pains, your sorrows and your flaws and the world will love you all the more. Do not fear your own humanity for that is what connects you to the rest of us.

Carl Larsson The Swedish Painter – From Unhappy Childhood to Sheer Bliss

Carl Larsson born in 1853, had a dark and unhappy childhood, struggling with both poverty and verbal abuse. As a student at the Academy of Fine Arts in Stockholm, the hardship would continue with Carl working his studying to support his mother and brother with their everyday needs. At the age of twenty-four he moved…

Carl Larsson born in 1853, had a dark and unhappy childhood, struggling with both poverty and verbal abuse. As a student at the Academy of Fine Arts in Stockholm, the hardship would continue with Carl working his studying to support his mother and brother with their everyday needs. At the age of twenty-four he moved to Paris. However, the years in Paris did not come easy. In fact, Carl's struggling continued as a hardworking artist without any luck or fortune. The young artist's hardship and struggling life would eventually come to a stop, and take a positive turn when he at the age of twenty-nine, met the young Swedish artist Karin Berg.

Some of Larsson's Most Influential Works

The six-year younger Karin, had also studied art at the Academy of Fine Arts and should follow the same path as so many other artist, and moved to Paris. It was in Grez-sur-Loing, a Scandinavian artists' colony outside of Paris the couple first met, and a year later they got married. It was during this period in Carl's life, he changed his painting technique from oil painting and started to paint in watercolor instead. Moreover, this was the period in his life he should paint some of his most influential works. After a few years, Carl and Karin returned to their homeland.

Lilla Hyttnäs

In 1884, the couples first child, Suzanne was born. Another seven children should soon follow. However, two of the children died tragically. Mats at the young age of two months and Ulf at the age of eighteen. Karin's father who was a successful business-person, gave the growing family a small cottage to live in. This home should in the future be a symbol for the Swedish interior design. Latermore, this cottage, named Lilla Hyttnäs, should in the future be one of the most visited famous artist-homes in the world.

True Swedish Interior Design

Karin's artistic talent and her ability in colors and design formed their house to become what is today the characteristics of true Swedish interior design. The couple furnished the home to fit their unique taste of open and light spaces, in user-friendly rooms. They choose bright colors with bold interior decorations, amplified with modern textiles in vivid color combinations such as green, blue and red. This interior design was a huge contrast to the other dark Victorian style with its over-opulence that ruled at the time in rest of Europe.

Important Heritage Site

After the death of their famous parents, the surviving children wanted to keep their parents home just as it was. Therefore, the “Carl and Karin Larsson's Family Association” was established and has then become a meaningful and important heritage site, representing a typical Swedish way of life. If you ever visit the Larsson's home, you will catch a nostalgic glimpse into times long past, representing an echo of simpler times.

Loving and Idyllic Family Life

Carl's love and affection toward his family and his lovely home, is so clear in so many of his works. Carl found inspiration and models, not only from his wife and children, but also from the local craftsmen and women that helped the large family with their tasks. His paintings of his wife is very moving. Karin was a very beautiful woman indeed. However, the paintings literally look as if his love for his wife is magnifying her natural beauty, in some way enhancing it.

Sheer Bliss

Carl Larsson is very much one of the most loved artists in Sweden. He represents a nostalgic era of simplicity that is sadly forgotten in today's harried pace of modern world. Through his paintings, we are able to follow the life of Carl Larsson, as an artist, husband and father, and take part of a family that amplified a feeling of joy, happiness, love and treasured moments.

This loving and idyllic family life with sheer bliss of happiness, was a far cry from the unhappy childhood and the struggling years the artist once had experienced.

To read more of Sannel's articles, please visit her blog: http://sannellarson.blogspot.se/

Seascape Painting Comes Alive As A Result Of Impasto Painting

When doing a seascape painting I sometimes use impasto technique. I do it lightly, looking for flavor, instead of slapping on the paint like a drunken five year old. I also use this technique with landscape paintings, and sometimes, depending on the type of pet, pet paintings. Imasto is when you apply the oil heavily,…

When doing a seascape painting I sometimes use impasto technique. I do it lightly, looking for flavor, instead of slapping on the paint like a drunken five year old. I also use this technique with landscape paintings, and sometimes, depending on the type of pet, pet paintings.

Imasto is when you apply the oil heavily, creating thick chunks and ridges on the canvas. Over use this technique and it is like paper mache, and one has to question what medium one is actually trying to utilize. Used gently, it tends to give flavors of shadow and depth.

There is actually nothing incorrect about over using this trick, it really is a matter of what the artist is comfortable with. There are some people who like to actually create shadows with colors. Then there are others who do not like shading colors and prefer the actual three dimensional effect when one applies thick impasto.

This three dimensional effect can be a two edged sword. Obviously, there is little 3-D when one snaps a photo, what you see is what you get. But that is why seascape paintings have so much more versatility than seascape photos.

Layer on the white, and suddenly you get a foamy effect, and the person viewing the artwork has the feeling that a wave is actually cresting. Apply the blue / green oil in swirls and one can see the little circles within a mixture riptide. This gives a feeling of motion that can actually make one dizzy.

As you change the depth of the layer you can create real shadows with the oil. You have to be careful with this because a bright light in an art show can destroy the depth and leave the viewer with a flat feeling. Obviously, there is going to be no shadow in this case, no feeling of motion, and impasto is useless.

The specific technique for doing impasto is quite interesting. There are people that prefer to apply their impasto with a butter knife instead of a brush, and they wield their tools like sculptors, searching for ways to blend impasto with the effective painting technique. Most people prefer a variety of sturdy brushes and these people often concentrate on shading the color rather than the thickness of the oil.

As you can tell from my words, I prefer to blend color with depth, then using two techniques to create motion in the painting I am doing. If I can create motion, then I can create life. I can take seascape photography, a flat, featureless photo of the ocean, and using impasto and proper coloring, create a whole world of motion in my seascape painting.

Custom Pet Painting Photo Selection Tips

Coming up with a photo for custom pet paintings can be hard, to say the least. After all, which of your favorite images is going to reveal your dog or cat in the best possible light? Which picture is going to show the real personality of your best pal? While some people know, without the…

Coming up with a photo for custom pet paintings can be hard, to say the least. After all, which of your favorite images is going to reveal your dog or cat in the best possible light? Which picture is going to show the real personality of your best pal?

While some people know, without the need to think about it, which photograph is the one they want, some people do not. Thus, it is helpful to have a large number of images for the artist to inspect. In an extreme situation the artist can draw from a number of pics to 'compile' or put together custom pet portraits.

The first rule when selecting a photo for an artist to work from, then, is never throw away an old Kodak of your pet. And, make sure you have the complete selection on hand for the artist to use. Even an old pet drawing your child might have made might have some use to the painter.

This rule, of not throwing away any photograph, applies to every image you might possess. Okay, the fur shading might not be fantastic in one pic, but the pose might be great. So you pick a good pose, and use the fur shading from another jpeg.

One of the things an artist will always look for is where the eyes are clean and clear. A far away and fuzzy shot might not show perfectly, crisp eyes, but another photo might do the trick. This is a classic case of two images being brought together to make the perfect blend which results in the best possible painting of your buddy.

Here are a few things I have found useful over my years of painting. A picture of a pet with a son or daughter in it … it is possible to 'delete' the child and focus on that loving looking in your cat or dog's eyes. Or, a distant photo, when zoomed and cropped for a close up, may reveal enough detail for the artist.

Another thing that frequently comes up is an off center image. With today's wonderful computers one can easily center and focus. This makes a photo that the owner might not think useful to actually have extreme value.

To bring this subject to a close, look for the best picture you can. In the event that you do not have one that displays your furry pal in the best way, choose a couple shots and send them along to the artist. And, most important, always send copies, do not send the original image for the painter to make your custom pet paintings with.

Pet Paintings And The History Of Canvas

The substance of choice for Pet Paintings is oil, and the material best suited for oil is canvas. Canvas 'drinks' the paint so the brush strokes hold their true and never shimmy. Furthermore, oil provides full luster. Interestingly, canvas was not always the choice of professional painters. Before 1400 the main choice of the portrait…

The substance of choice for Pet Paintings is oil, and the material best suited for oil is canvas. Canvas 'drinks' the paint so the brush strokes hold their true and never shimmy. Furthermore, oil provides full luster.

Interestingly, canvas was not always the choice of professional painters. Before 1400 the main choice of the portrait artist, and other artists, was wood. Wood was good, it 'drank' the oil, but it was expensive to make and prepare.

The renaissance arrived, new horizons opened up, and new technologies were found around the earth. One particular technology was linked to the moving of sailing boats, and this was to prove a boon to all painters. That's right, that stiff canvas used to catch the wind and push wooden ships and iron men over the oceans turned out to be the perfect replacement for wood.

Canvas was originally made from a family of plants called hemp. Hemp, as most any hippie knows, is another name for cannabis. The material was originally constructed by weaving the fibers of cannabis in a tight pattern.

Canvas was probably first stretched over basic wooden planks; it took a while for wooden frames to catch on. This was probably around the fifteenth century, and the practice exploded in popularity. Every artist who was any good, and a few who were not, were ecstatic over the new material.

As has been indicated, canvas 'drinks' oil, but that was only the beginning of the benefits. Canvas was also light, easy to transport, and much cheaper. Interestingly, because canvas is so easy to use it became possible to paint larger works, and the size of portraits literally exploded.

The next big occurrence, in the history of this painter's medium, was in the type of material used to make the canvas. During the industrial revolution American Cotton was less expensive, and therefore became the artist's choice. It should be said, however, that the top tier of portraits, the more famous artists, still preferred hemp, for it lasted longer, was stronger, and, here's something to consider, was less sooner to the effects of mildew.

Today's canvas, used by the portrait artists everywhere, is usually made of cotton duck, this because of the large popularity (and decreed expenditure) of acrylics. More accomplished artists, which would be to say those fellows and gals who actually make serious living with their brushes, choose linen, and this is because the top notch painters work with oils. Whatever the medium used, however, the true test is in the skill of the person doing the painting, and this especially holds true for the art of pet paintings.

Advantages of Online Art Galleries

People are generally too busy these days to do even routine tasks and just want to rush back home after work to relax. One has to be an art enthusiast to spare time to visit an exhibition. Moreover, if there are two or more exhibitions at the same time, you will rarely be able to…

People are generally too busy these days to do even routine tasks and just want to rush back home after work to relax. One has to be an art enthusiast to spare time to visit an exhibition. Moreover, if there are two or more exhibitions at the same time, you will rarely be able to attend both, no matter how much you wish you could. Obviously, you would have to give one exhibition a miss and find solace in the joys of the other.

Thankfully, purchasing methods for art have evolved over the centuries. Today, cyberspace is the most popular and the latest platform for art browsing, auctioning, selling, and of course buying. For the modern art buyer, it is very exciting to move around online art galleries.

Art lovers have the opportunity to see many more pieces and to appreciate them at their own leisure rather than visiting a traditional gallery. There is also the advantage of discretion on an auction and sale websites as it is much easier to make a bid and to buy an item. Generally, the rules for selling and purchasing remain the same, but the purchaser should be internet-savvy to understand the system properly. Every online gallery provides useful tips for buying and selling, even if you are new to the process.

A large number of quality artworks is received by the galleries from across the world. Superb works from renovated artists that will increase the range of your collection are easily obtainable. The purchase would take place directly between the buyer and the seller, but galleries also provide assistance to obtain artwork directly from the artists. Their website links and email addresses are noted under their respective works.

Get yourself listed with the gallery so that they can send you updated emails of future events. Previews of an artist's work can also be forwarded through email so you can have a look at some pieces at your leisure. A full record of earlier exhibitions and paintings is also maintained for your reference. In the event of exhibitions being held simultaneously, you can go online to find out where and how you can attend these exhibitions in person. These online websites allow you to surf at your convenience and, after all, an online art gallery does not have a closing time.

The possibility of dealing with fake art pieces is less likely because you are dealing with artists directly and many of these artists have their own websites where they exhibit their work. Because of the advantages posed by the Internet, auction houses have their online galleries with artwork of renovated artists. Through the world, a large number of people visit these galleries every day, giving artists more exposure and making it possible for artists to be contacted by prospective buyers on an international level. Online galleries are also optimized so that search engines can locate the artists and exhibits without difficulty.

When a deal is finalized, artwork are usually delivered directly to buyers through different forms of delivery services. Due to the reputability of selected art websites, art lovers deal with them regularly. As a safety measure, proof that it is the artist's original work is also provided on completion of sale.

Post Impressionist Painting – Analysis of Van Gogh’s Night Cafe

Van Gogh Café Terrace at Night, also known as the Place du Forum, it is a colored oil painting produced by the Dutch artist Vincent van Gogh in Arles, France, mid-September 1888. The painting was not signed, but described and stated by the artist in his letters on various occasions. There is also a large…

Van Gogh Café Terrace at Night, also known as the Place du Forum, it is a colored oil painting produced by the Dutch artist Vincent van Gogh in Arles, France, mid-September 1888. The painting was not signed, but described and stated by the artist in his letters on various occasions. There is also a large pen drawing of the composition which originates from the artist's estate.

In a letter Van Gogh wrote to his brother, Theo, the artist said Ginoux had taken so much of his money that he'd told the cafe owner it was time to take his revenge by painting the place.

In August 1888 the artist told his brother in a letter:

Today I am probably going to begin on the interior of the café where I have a room, by gas light, in the evening. It is what they call here a “café de nuit” (they are fairly frequent here), staying open all night. “Night prowlers” can take refuge there when they have no money to pay for a lodging, or are too drunk to be taken in.

In the middle of September 1888, Van Gogh sat up for three consecutive nights to paint the picture, sleeping during the day. Little later, he sent the water-color, copying the composition and again simplyfing the color scheme on order to meet the simplicity of Japanese woodblock prints.

Van Gogh's Cafe Terrace at Night, showing outdoor tables, a street scene and the night sky, was painted in Arles at about the same time. It depicts a different cafe, a larger establishment on the Place du Forum

Van Gogh wrote many letters to his brother Theo van Gogh, and often included details of his latest work. The artist wrote his brother more than once about The Night Café. According to Meyer Schapiro “there are few works on which [Van Gogh] has written with more conviction.”

In one of the letters he describes this painting:

I have tried to express the terrible passions of humanity by means of red and green. The room is blood red and dark yellow with a green billiard table in the middle; there are four lemon-yellow lamps with a glow of orange and green. Everywhere there is a clash and contrast of the most alien reds and greens, in the figures of little sleeping hooligans, in the empty dreary room, in violet and blue. The blood-red and the yellow-green of the billiard table, for instance, contrast with the soft tender Louis XV green of the counter, on which there is a rose nosegay. The white clothes of the landlord, watchful in a corner of that furnace, turn lemon-yellow, or pale luminous green. ”

The next day (September 9), he wrote Theo: “In my picture of the Night Café I have tried to express the idea that the café is a place where one can ruin myself, go mad or commit a crime. to express, as it was, the powers of darkness in a low public house, by soft Louis XV green and malachite, contrasting with yellow-green and harsh blue-greens, and all this in an atmosphere like a devil's furnace, of pale sulphur And all with an appearance of Japanese gaiety, and the good nature of Tartarin.

He also wrote: “It is color not actually true from the point of view of the stereoscopic realist, but color to suggest the emotion of an ardent temperament.”

The violent explosion of the colors and the thick texture of the paint made the picture “One of the ugliest pictures I have done”, Van Gogh wrote at one point. He also called it “the equivalent although different, of The Potato Eaters”, which it resembles something in its use of lamplight and concerns for the condition of people in need.

Soon after its execution, Van Gogh incorporated this painting into his Décoration for the Yellow House.

http://www.yakivu.com

The History Of Body Painting

Body art is the decoration of the human body. The most common forms of body art are tattoos, professional makeup, body painting, fashion makeup, face painting and temporary airbrush tattoos. Body painting is a form of temporary body art. Unlike permanent tattoos, body painting can lasts for several hours. Body painting has been a significant…

Body art is the decoration of the human body. The most common forms of body art are tattoos, professional makeup, body painting, fashion makeup, face painting and temporary airbrush tattoos. Body painting is a form of temporary body art. Unlike permanent tattoos, body painting can lasts for several hours. Body painting has been a significant part of rituals dating back thousands of years. Body painting and face painting, along with dancing and drumming, were the means for some cultures to reach specific altered state of consciousness. In this state, group members would lose the sensation of fear and pain and become fully dedicated to the group interests. This state was critical for physical survival and as a defense from predators, enemies or other forces of the nature.

In today's world body painting is largely used in the fashion and film industry. It is also commonly used as a method of gaining attention in political protests or expressing rage, beliefs or feelings. Painting that is restricted to the face is known as face painting, professional makeup or fashion makeup. Traditional face painting is applied with face makeup, brush and sponge. The more contemporary form of face painting utilizes Vibe airbrush face makeup and an airbrush. Fashion makeup, also known as extreme beauty makeup, consistor of designs applied around the eye area using highly pigmented colors and shimmers.

While permanent tattoos have been around for thousands of years, the desire to remove or cover permanent tattoos has probably existed almost as long. The same desire that exists to remove or cover permanent tattoos also applies to scars or skin imperfections that may exist on an individual's skin. Typical processes for removing persistent tattoos or correcting or hiding scars or skin imperfections include painful and expensive surgical procedures, such as laser removal, that can result in scarring. Less permanent methods involve the application of professional makeup. There are many different types of professional makeup including foundation, powders, lip sticks, mascaras and bronzers. Most of the professional makeup media can be applied with a brush and sponge. Yet, the fastest and smoothest application can be achieved with an airbrush.

The most common form of body painting is temporary airbrush tattoos. Temporary airbrush tattoos are quickly applied using an airbrush and stencils. Airbrush tattoos can last for days and are removable with rubbing alcohol. Temporary airbrush tattoos have been applied for a variety of different purposes, including decoration, social status, and as a sign of endearment.

Corporate Art Collections: A Very Large Market for Artists

In the business world, art is not a basic necessity. In fact, in North America, it has been viewed as an unnecessary luxury or a distracting frivolity. Often businessmen do not even notice the absence of art or good design. Clients come through the door because they already know that the company is offering what…

In the business world, art is not a basic necessity. In fact, in North America, it has been viewed as an unnecessary luxury or a distracting frivolity. Often businessmen do not even notice the absence of art or good design. Clients come through the door because they already know that the company is offering what they need and want, and as soon as they are no longer satisfied with either the goods, services, or prices, they will leave – no matter what kind of art is on the walls. The art might enhance their experience or underline a certain theme, but in corporate life there is no substitute for the direct experience of a satisfactory business transaction. But companies continue to buy art and the amount of corporate art acquisitions annually are greater than art purchased by museums or private collectors.

After over 30 years of documenting and working in the artworld, I have learned some basic truths that demonstrate that corporate art collecting is a very important part of the artworld, but it still has unique characteristics that you need to understand to successfully sell your art. One of the myths about corporate art is that businesses buy art as an investment. If the corporate art collection appreciates in value, that fact may be satisfying to corporate executives, and it is true that art purchased wisely will probably have a much better return when it is sold later – but there is a much stronger desire to buy art rather than trying to sell it at the top of the market. Corporations already have many other profit-making skills, so they leave the “buying and selling art for profit” to others.

Corporations are more interested in enhancing their corporate image by developing and maintaining art collections – the collections are often considered to be a part of the Corporate Social Responsibility program. Often considered to be the new patrons of art – and many journalists have referred to them as the modern equivalent of the Medici – many corporations are due the responsibility in promoting art and culture within the society that they belong to.

But a fundamental reason that encourages corporate art collecting is the fact that there have been several studies that have demonstrated that employee and corporate efficiency, productivity, and creativity increase when art is placed in the work place.

And it's not just employees who see the benefit of art in the workplace, it also has a positive effect with visitors and customers. Well positioned artwork often becomes a talking point for visitors, and it helps promote the company's image as it provides evidence of the company's interest in improving the working environment for their employees.

Art in the workplace is really a part of a larger trend. It is a part of the trend towards humanizing the work place. It's all part of the environment and its part of the desire to make the office a better place to work ….. And improving the quality of life for everyone.

So how can an artist or art adviser promote and sell their art to corporations? Realize that art is not only purchased by the big corporations such as Citibank, Bank of America and Microsoft, but also smaller companies, law firms, accounting companies, hotels, and even restaurants. These may also be more accessible and less competitive, and may be especially interested in working with regional and local art galleries and artists.

Most companies that have smaller collections also tend to be more interested in artworks by artists from the region in which the company operates. And even large multi-national companies tend to acquire artworks from artists in the different countries where they have branches.

Companies are often concerned with being good corporate citizens. They view their art collections as a way to support the local fine arts community. Putting money – and in this case, art – into the community, while improving that community and creating goodwill, is in the best interest of the company

In addition to the traditional media of paintings, original prints, and sculpture, one of the interesting recent phenomena is the growing number of companies now collecting crafts and folk art. Today, crafts are a generally accepted medium and are very easy to acquire. Craft art is everywhere, and is easier often than sculpture because crafts are less expensive and the imagination is usually more accessible.

Corporate art collecting is now an established segment of the art world, with its own corps of professionals and specialists, and its own philosophy and standards of ethics. The more you know about the corporate arr world, the better chance you have to sell your art.

A useful tool that is available today is the “International Directory of Corporate Art Collections.” This directory, available in an digital downloadable form, has been in publication since 1983 and has basic information on nearly 1000 collections around the world.

Portrait Painting Techniques – How to Paint Hair

Painting Hair Painting portraits is a great hobby that gives both the artist and the model much pleasure. It is better for both however if the texture, color and flow of the hair closely matches the model. Follow these steps to obtain more realistic colors in your next portrait. Before painting hair, you should always…

Painting Hair

Painting portraits is a great hobby that gives both the artist and the model much pleasure. It is better for both however if the texture, color and flow of the hair closely matches the model. Follow these steps to obtain more realistic colors in your next portrait.

Before painting hair, you should always have the rest of the face finished first. The flesh color extend into the hairline. This is so that the flesh color shows through and the hair does not look unnatural. Remember that hair is much more than one layer, therefore, you need to paint it in layers. There are also hundreds of shades of hair color. To keep it as simple as possible try to base each portrait with, blonde, brown (this includes red), black or gray.

Under paint the entire hair area with a very light mixture of one of these colors. These are called undertones. This under painting will actually be the highlights because as you work you will not cover all of this. Notice where the dark or shadowed areas are and paint them in. Now use a darker color and start stroking in hair strands. Black is the opposite. Start with the darkest as the undertones, then add lighter layers. Continue until you are satisfied with the results. It is very easy to overdo hair. Know when to stop!

Here are the colors you will use for any hair tone . Remember to apply the undertones first

Blonde (Reds) Titanium White, Cadmium Yellow Medium, (Alizarin Crimson)

Use Burnt Umber to darken blonde and red hair

Brown Titanium White, Burnt Umber

Use Cadmium Red or Ivory Black for red or blackish tones

Black Ivory Black Undertones

Warm Black – Ivory Black & touch of Brown

Cool Black – Ivory Black & touch of Blue

Gray Titanium White, Ivory Black for a Gray Undertone

Warm Gray – Ivory Black & touch of Brown

Cool Gray – Ivory Black & touch of Blue

Start the first layer, or undertones with a very watery mixture of paint. Use a medium to large brush because you are not painting details. Do not try to paint in individual hair strands at this stage. Start adding more paint color to your brush and add some more layers. Pull the brush in the direction of the flow of hair. Use a liner brush to add some indications of individual strands. Add any deep pockets of color to really give the portrait depth. I added some deep shadow on the side of the neck.

Congratulations! You should be well on your way to being your own master portrait painter. As always, do not forget to sign your painting.

Painting Portraits – Choosing the Painting Surface

The first step in portrait painting is choosing what surface you will paint your picture on. There are several painting surfaces on the market today. If you are painting a watercolor picture for example, there are several varieties of thicknesses or weights of watercolor paper to choose from. There are several types of painting surfaces…

The first step in portrait painting is choosing what surface you will paint your picture on. There are several painting surfaces on the market today. If you are painting a watercolor picture for example, there are several varieties of thicknesses or weights of watercolor paper to choose from. There are several types of painting surfaces for the acrylic and oil artists as well. Following is an overview of the most popular painting surfaces.

Preparing The Canvas

Of canvas products, canvas paper is the least expensive surface for painting on. Canvas paper is appropriate for watercolor, oil and acrylic painting. Canvas paper comes in large pads and is easily ripped off just like a pad of paper. Also available are rolls of canvas paper. This paper will not tear or buckle like ordinary paper. You can mount, matte, put it under glass or even staple it to a frame. Use canvas paper when you want to experiment, practice or use for your finished work. The best thing about canvas paper is that when framed or matted, it is hard to tell that you did not paint on stretched canvas. The quality of canvas paper is very good. I suggest using canvas paper when beginning or practicing but realize that for lasting quality features, you might want to advance to stretch canvas.

Canvas boards or panels. Canvas boards are usually very sturdy and reliably inexpensive. They are made from a stiff cellulose product, lined with a cotton canvas and primed with gesso. They are suitable for all types of media, including acrylics, watercolor and oils. Some advantages to using canvas boards are cost and the fact that they are thin. It's very easy to find mattes and frames when the painting or work is on a thin surface. Some disadvantages are that if cheaply made, these boards can and do warp over time. This can be especially aggravating if you have spent a lot of time on a piece.

Stretched canvas. Most professional oil or acrylic work is done on stretched canvas. Stretched cotton canvas is stapled on wooden strips or frames. The staples are either on the sides of the frame or the back depending on the company that made them. The canvas is usually primed with a couple coats of gesso and is ready to be painted on. There are a variety of stretched canvases so be sure that you are buying the correct one for the medium that you are using. There are also different textures from rough grade to portrait grade. Some canvases come painted around the deep edge for a frame less, contemporary look.
It is important to choose an appropriate painting surface for your best portrait. After all, the painting may grace the walls of you or your loved ones home for many happy years.

How to Paint People – The Easy Way

How to paint people is a common question that many beginning portrait artist search for on the Internet or in bookstores. Chances are that they have attempted to paint a persons' portrait and were not pleased with the results. There are a few tricks and painting techniques that can be used so that an achievable…

How to paint people is a common question that many beginning portrait artist search for on the Internet or in bookstores. Chances are that they have attempted to paint a persons' portrait and were not pleased with the results. There are a few tricks and painting techniques that can be used so that an achievable portrait can be produced. I will explain a few of the easiest ways that I've found to learn how to paint people.

Get An Accurate Drawing On Your Canvas

If your drawing is to capture the likeness of a certain individual, you will want to sketch the portrait in pencil prior to painting. You can free hand this if you are not good at drawing. A couple of easier methods though are to use a grid and duplicate the photo to the canvas by drawing or replicating the individual grid squares. Another and my favorite method, is to print a paper black and white copy of the photo, then completely darken the back of the paper with soft charcoal. Next place the paper on your canvas and with a sharp pencil, simply draw over the printed photo. You're sketch will appear on the canvas like magic!

Paint The Indication Of People

One of the easiest ways to paint people is to keep things simple and paint just the indication of people. If you're confused than do not be. The easiest way to explain what I mean is for me to describe this with an example. Imagine a beach scene with a couple strolling hand in hand far in the distance. If you were to examine the people closely, you would probably see that they are really shapes. Each head would simply be a round shape on top of a triangle shaped body, on top of two rectangular shaped legs. Two quick rectangular shaped arms connect the bodies. Add some highlights and you have simple people!

Paint Only Part Of The Person

Many artists struggle with accuracy when painting people. It's true that a person's features must be accurate in order for a portrait to be successful. If you choose poses that depict side views or partial views you can cut your work in half and create interesting portraits by only painting the half of the face that you actually see. For example, try painting a child's profile at the beach vs. the child facing straight on.

Paint Unknown People Or Strangers

Another fun and easy way to paint people is to paint strangers. The reason for this is that you are not trying to get an exact likeness. If you've made their nose too large or too small, no one is going to know the difference! You can use magazines, books or other paintings to get some ideas. Let's say that you took a photo while at the park of an elderly lady sitting on a park bench and reading a book. You decide to turn the photo in a painting. The painting would still be interesting even if the lady did not resemble the actual photo at all, because no one knows her anyways.

Do not Paint What You Can not Paint

A great technique for painting humans is to choose poses that do not require a lot of detail. One way to do this is by painting subjects who are wearing sunglasses, if you are timid about painting eyes. If you're uncomfortable painting teeth then paint closed mouths or drape a scarf across the face. A very cute pose for a child's portrait is to have them peek from behind something. You will only see part of the face and it is an adorable scene with only part of the face showing.

By following these easy tricks and techniques, painting people should become easier and more enjoyable with every painting you attempt. How to paint people the easy way can be made simple by keeping the task simple!