Determining Whether a Painting Is Original or Reproduced

If you are purchasing an original art painting for your own pleasure, purchase what you like and what feels sensible. Be that as it may, purchasing an original art painting as a venture is identical different. It is less the painting but rather more about who painted it, and the evidence of the craftsman's real…

If you are purchasing an original art painting for your own pleasure, purchase what you like and what feels sensible. Be that as it may, purchasing an original art painting as a venture is identical different. It is less the painting but rather more about who painted it, and the evidence of the craftsman's real association with the piece.

1. Do your homework. Research the piece, know the craftsman's work, take a gander at a considerable lot of his pieces, and look at custom marks like signatures. Expanding your insight is basic for analyzing the piece and comprehending what to search for when judging originality.

2. Visit historic centers and concentrate on the patinas. If you solicit seeing the back of an artistic creation, the staff may assist you. Inspect the vibe and look for old fine arts. Study the profundity and the number of layers of paint expected to achieve the shade of color coveted by the painter.

3. Look at the front and back of the piece. Analyze the patina of the piece itself such as the dust and wear of the ages, surface, the shine of hues, or the deficiency in that department.

4. Look at the patina of the wood to figure out if the wood is old. Decide how the edge is assembled, considering what sort of nails and holders are utilized.

5. Check for bristles. Painted duplicates some of the time will have hairs from the shabby paint brush still in the paint on the canvas.

6. Smell the painting. When you do get your hands on the work of art, smell it. It takes oil a while to dry and years to totally lose the scent of oil.

7. Decide how the piece feels to you. Parity everything. Numerous fakes for instance, have no profundity of paint layers. It's anything but difficult to duplicate a piece electronically yet a scanner can not tell how many layers of paint a genuine piece has.

8. Check for consistency. A painted duplicate needs everything else to match, frames, and patina which are difficult to repeat.

9. Get the work assessed. If it is something you are infatuated with, you should get an outsider to freely survey it, someone who is not in adoration.

10. Note that a few merchants, possibly even including those on voyage boats, may appeavor to confuse the purchaser with sizes and periods, and even mediums to offer a lower quality piece at expanded costs. Search for the signature and number.

11. The exhibition. Numerous pieces will have display stickers or data composed on the back. Research that exhibition to learn whenever it has this. Search for indications of wear. There should be a few indications of wear on the casing and even on the canvas now and then.

12. Beware of a trick where the print is not numbered but rather another record is which is good for nothing, as any mark in stone can be used as a part of the genuine art.

Abstract Floral Painting Tips

These abstract floral painting tips will walk you through the procedure for painting an offbeat, beautiful flower, conceptual painting in acrylic like the one above. Painting abstract blooms is fun and simple. It's fundamentally a building procedure in which you paint shapes and examples with distinctive hues are one on top of the other and…

These abstract floral painting tips will walk you through the procedure for painting an offbeat, beautiful flower, conceptual painting in acrylic like the one above. Painting abstract blooms is fun and simple. It's fundamentally a building procedure in which you paint shapes and examples with distinctive hues are one on top of the other and opposite one another.

Materials You Need:

Acrylic paints, paintbrushes, canvas, ruler, pencil

A 12 x 12 inch canvas is ideal for the following abstract floral painting lessons. Prime your canvas by covering it with 1-2 layers of gesso. Once the gesso is dry, use your ruler and pencil to draw a framework on your canvas. For your 12 x 12 inch painting, draw 4 by 4 squares of 3 inches each.

After you have drawn your lattice, you're prepared to paint!

Steps to Take

1. The initial step is to paint every square in a strong shade of color. You can pick any hues you like.

2. The next step is to paint a fringe in each square. When you paint the outskirts, try to pick hues that match well with the foundation color of the square as well as with the neighboring hues.

3. Next, you need to paint circles in the squares. The circles can be any size and shade you need. Depicting an assortment of sizes and color creates an intriguing framework to work with.

4. Now paint petals and different points of interest around or on top of the circles. For instance,

a. Yellow petals around an orange circle

b. A small yellow circle within a red circle

c. Several yellow spots in a ring around an orange circle

d. A yellow roundabout line around a light blue circle

It's easier to pick one color, and afterward include a few tile elements with the same color before moving on to the next color. Prior to including the light yellow alloy elements above, you need to include some orange points of interest.

5. Next, include pink and red points of interest. Points of interest can be included on top of the various sub elements. Make an assortment of petal shapes, similar to tear-drops, transformed tear-drops, whirls, circles, half-circles, spiraling half-circles, etc.

6. Add a few pets and different points of interest in light orange and maroon. Next include some blue petals and sub elements as well as pink and yellow points of interest.

7. Add some subtle elements that are orange and yellow-orange.

8. Finally, add a sparkle and shimmer impact by including metallic blue, copper and gold to every blossom.

Knowing this abstract floral painting is done is an exceptionally subjective task, so go with your instincts. Some individuals like having a huge number of points of interest while others are more likely to add less detail. Discover parity in your artistic creations that satisfies you.

9 Ways To Get Inspired To Paint

1. Make a note of your dreams Most of the dreams we have we do not remember when we wake up. The next time you wake up and can remember your dreams, make a note of them. Dreams have inspired many creative minds over the years. 2. Explore where you live You do not have…

1. Make a note of your dreams

Most of the dreams we have we do not remember when we wake up. The next time you wake up and can remember your dreams, make a note of them. Dreams have inspired many creative minds over the years.

2. Explore where you live

You do not have to travel far to get inspired. Go for a wander and explore the area where you live. You never know what inspirational sights and experience you can discover just minutes from home.

3. Recycle discarded ideas

If you're the type who writes everything down, keep doing it. Look through some of your old writing to see if there are any ideas that inspire you. Something you thought was not good enough before might be just what you need to get inspired.

4. Stay in good shape

Generally speaking, the healthier you are, the better your frame of mind should be. Getting inspired can be harder when you're not in the best shape. Get active and you'll stand a better chance of feeling inspired.

5. Look at other artists' work

One of the easiest ways to get inspired is to see what other people have created. Have a look online for works of art to inspire you, or better yet, visit a gallery. If other people have created these works of art, there's no reason why you can not do the same.

6. Listen to music

Listening to music is great because it can clear your mind. It can also put you in the mood for working, no matter what type of music you to. To get you in the mood, listen to your favorite, create a playlist or even listen to music you've never heard before.

7. Take a trip down memory lane

Everyone has lots of stories and every story can be a source of inspiration. Take a trip down memory lane and relive some of your favorite memories from your life so far. Get friends and families involved and share memories with them.

8. Make time for your hobbies

Think of a hobby that's got nothing to do with painting and make time for it. Focusing on something other than the task is a great way to recharge your creative batteries. You might even get some inspiration from practicing your hobby as well.

9. Have more conversations

People can be a great source of inspiration and so can conversations. Have a conversation with a friend or family member, or even strike up a conversation with someone you do not know. You never know what you might end up talking about.

4 Ways To Make Your First Art Sale Online

When I was eight years old, I had high hopes of one day having a career as a flourishing artist. I would spend hours drawing, coloring, and painting hoping to improve my skills. Unfortunately, like most artists, my dreams were eventually shattered by the opinions of others who were “kind enough” to let me know…

When I was eight years old, I had high hopes of one day having a career as a flourishing artist. I would spend hours drawing, coloring, and painting hoping to improve my skills. Unfortunately, like most artists, my dreams were eventually shattered by the opinions of others who were “kind enough” to let me know that artists do not make any money.

“Why do not you just go to nursing school and just worry about art in your free time?”

“Art school is a waste of money. You are not guaranteed a job and you'll be in crazy debt.”

Sadly, I succumbed to the fear of being broke my whole life and attended nursing school. To make a long story short, I ended up hating nursing and switched to business during my last years of school. What was interesting about my shiny new business degree is that I had a great deal of difficulty finding a job with it.

So through trial and error, I decided to buckle down and find a way to sell my paintings and sketches. To my surprise, people actually wanted to give me money for my works of art. I have not made nearly enough to make it a full-time job, but my art skill brings in extra money throughout the year for me.

I've compiled a list of critical things you must do if you want to make that first art sale. Do not give up or think selling art is for a select few. Put that creative brain to work, and in no time you'll have the coveted ability to bring in income from your craft.

Step 1: Put Your Work Out There

I know this looks obvious, but so many creatives are perfectionists, and can not seem to part ways with their work until it's 100% perfect. One of the most helpful things I've learned is to put myself out there even if I do not feel qualified.

You can not just post 1 or 2 pictures and expect to call that a portfolio. Gather your best sketches, works in progress, and artworks and upload them to Instagram, Facebook, or an artist website. People like to see bodies of work.

Occasionally, people will be interested in your work and can not wait for you to post your latest sketch or painting.

Step 2: Social Media

It's very unbelievably, in this day and age, that you do not have some form of a social media account. I made my first sales by posting a picture to Facebook of a watercolor painting. I had absolutely no intent of selling it. Actually, I was still in the phase of putting myself out there. I was also very discouraged at this point because I had posted a lot of art and received little likes or feedback. Then one day, I posted a watercolor painting, and someone inboxed me. “Tina, how much are you selling that painting for? I HAVE to have it.”

My first instinct was to say, “Are you crazy? It's even that good.” But thankfully, I kept my mouth shut and took the money. If you continue to post your art, there will always be a customer who resonates with that piece and will very well exchange their money for it.

Step 3: Broaden Your Horizons

When I was not making the sales I hoped for with my paintings, I decided to learn a new skill that incorporated my love of visual art: Web Design. Web design was incredibly difficult for me at first because I came in with absolutely no knowledge. I never had great technical skills growing up, so I tended to shy away from all things related to the computer. Thankfully, I ignored my inner critic and learned web design and computer programming. Both are skills I have grown to love. I immediately realized how in demand a skill like this was. Subsequently, the money flowed in after that.

Maybe web design is not for you, but this is just one example. You can also make your artwork available in prints, t-shirts, notebooks … etc. You can go the graphic design route and make artwork for groups or businesses. One of the best ways to broaden your horizons is to turn your knowledge into teaching. Teaching not only gives you credit in your field, but increases your income because not only do you make money from your classes or books, but this gives your own art exposure and will increase sales in that as well.

Whatever path you choose, the point is not to let a lack of sales discourage you from producing amazing art. Find alternative routes to get your artwork in front of people or broaden your skill set. It's not always easy, but it's totally worth it to be able to make money from doing something you love.

Step 4: Be Consistent

Do not post a picture of your art, disappear for two months, and expect customers to start pounding your door. If you want to make sales you have to be consistent. There's only a limited amount of time you have on a newsfeed before your content is lost in the shuffle and replaced by newer stuff. So even if it feels repetitive in your mind, post the same thing several times over the course of a few days.

I like to think of this as a reminder for people. In fact, many have told me, “Oh, I'm so glad you posted that again, I would have forgotten if I did not see that on the newsfeed again.”

Do not worry about being pushy or over the top. Just do friendly reminder from time to time and this puts what you have to say in the back of people's minds.

Conclusion

I hope this helps you on your path to making your first art sale. Let me know what methods you like to use for making art sales!

What an Artist Wants: Benefits of Oil Painting

Oil painting is a form of art that has been around for centuries; various artists from different parts of the world have been doing it. Are you one of them? Making use of oil has its share of advantages and disadvantages. Some are based on straight facts, while some depend on opinions which vary from…

Oil painting is a form of art that has been around for centuries; various artists from different parts of the world have been doing it. Are you one of them? Making use of oil has its share of advantages and disadvantages. Some are based on straight facts, while some depend on opinions which vary from one person to another. In this article, we'll focus on the benefits. What makes oil painting great, and what are its advantages over other forms of art? You're reading this article probably because you have a strong opinion regarding the subject of discussion. Or are you merely curious? Whatever your reason is, just feel free to read and learn.

What are the advantages of oil painting?

• It is a simple medium to work with.

In fact, it is the simplest. Compared to pastels and watercolor, oil is the easiest medium to use. For this, most beginners opt for it. Additionally, it is also easy to make corrections on the canvas when oil is used.

• It blends well with other colors.

Oil blends with the surrounding paint. Because of this, artists become able to make various creative strokes and blends. You would not be able to do this if you use other types of paint.

• It is slow to dry.

This can actually be an advantage or a disadvantage depending on how you look at it. If you want to finish your work immediately, this might not be the right medium for you. But if a certain situation requires you to work for a long period of time, then this may be the perfect one for you.

• It can be left open for long periods of time.

You can actually leave it exposed in the air for a couple of weeks without drying. Should you want to make some changes or give room to better decisions, you'll definitely enjoy having this benefit.

• It produces better outputs.

This is another benefit bought by being slow to dry. Because of such trait, artists can work several times on the paintings without worrying that the canvas might easily dry up. If you want to take your time, you are at liberty to do it.

These advantages are undeniably true, and can indeed help different artists produce their desired results.

Indeed, oil is a good medium choice. Do you agree? Do you want to make an artwork through oil painting? Numerous artists do; so you better try it yourself, too. Show your artistic side through painting. Express yourself through various colors and strokes. It's just fine to change your mind. Change your shades; change your shapes. Relax and do whatever you want. Take your time and work for several sessions until the perfect piece of art is done. These will all be possible if you use oil as your medium. If you do not, then do not expect to reap these benefits as well. As an artist or even as an enthusiast, make sure you really know what your preferences are. It's what really matters, anyway.

3 Canvas Materials And 3 Canvas Forms

A blank canvas is full of possibilities: you’re right at the start of your painting and you could fill your blank canvas with practically anything. But what type of canvas should you go for? There are lots of options and it’s worth looking into different types so you get one that’s right for you.

A blank canvas is full of possibilities: you’re right at the start of your painting and you could fill your blank canvas with practically anything. But what type of canvas should you go for? There are lots of options and it’s worth looking into different types so you get one that’s right for you.

Create A Painting In 4 Easy Steps

1. Find the subject of your painting It's important that the subject of your painting is something you care about. If you do not care about it, you're not going to feel motivated enough to get the painting completed. Finding the subject can be hard for some artists: some spend ages trying to find the…

1. Find the subject of your painting

It's important that the subject of your painting is something you care about. If you do not care about it, you're not going to feel motivated enough to get the painting completed. Finding the subject can be hard for some artists: some spend ages trying to find the right thing to paint; some come up with a long list of prospective painting subjects and whittle that list down based on what they think will be better to paint. Landscape painters especially can spend many weeks or even months traveling about trying to find that perfect landscape to paint.

2. Have plenty of material to work from

If you're painting something like a bowl of fruit in your home, great, you've got that to work from. If, on the other hand, you're painting something like a scene from a park that's a good half an hour drive away, you'll need some reference material to work from. A lot of landscape artists like doing most of their work outdoors, something which is called plein air painting, but then they may finish off bits of their painting at home. This is when it's handy to have some reference material, such as photos or drawings of the scene you're working on.

3. Choose the surface you're going to work on

Choosing the right surface for your painting is important because different surfaces can give paintings different effects. Some surfaces are better suited to some types of paint than others; for example, if you're painting with acrylics, you should look for a surface material that's designed to handle acrylics. Most artists paint on canvas: this comes in lots of varieties and there are types to suit every type of paint. If you're painting on a surface other than canvas, for example wood, paper or even leather, make sure the surface will readily accept the type of paint you're using.

4. Get started, then start another painting

Once you've got all of your supplies ready, it's time to get painting. There's no set rule about how to actually start a painting, though generally speaking, you should map out the painting's features in pencil so you can see where everything will go. It's a good idea to get any areas of fine detail done first, so then you can concentrate on larger areas where there's less detail. Once you've made a start on your painting, put it away and get started on another. It may sound like a crazy idea, but having more than one painting on the go can be beneficial: not only does it keep you more motivated because you've got more to finish, it also keeps you interested and gives you something else to think about.

8 Tips For Painting With Acrylics

1. Be sure not to mix too much water with acrylics, otherwise they'll lose their thick texture and other similar qualities. This applies both when mixing paintings and when applying the paint to the surface you're painting on 2. Because acrylic dry really fast, it's important for you to work fast. Do this and you…

1. Be sure not to mix too much water with acrylics, otherwise they'll lose their thick texture and other similar qualities. This applies both when mixing paintings and when applying the paint to the surface you're painting on

2. Because acrylic dry really fast, it's important for you to work fast. Do this and you should be able to effectively produce the painting you want without running into any problems. If you think you'll need more time, add a retarder to the paint to slow its drying time, thereby giving you more time to work on your painting

3. It's also important to consider the paint on your palette. Every so often, give this paint a light spray of water with a spray bottle or a mister to keep the paint from drying out before you've had a chance to use it

4. If you want to mix your paintings, again this is something you'll have to do quite quickly before the paint dries out. If you happen to be mixing your paintings on paper, a good trick is to dampen the paper; this will give you a bit more time to work as it will make the paintings stay wet for longer

5. When you've finished painting, it's important to ensure you get all of the paint off your paintbrush. Give it a good wash with some warm water first, then use a mild soap to try and get all of the paint out of the paintbrush's bristles. Do not try solvents or anything like that: when cleaning acrylics, all you need is soap and water

6. A rather simple one, but an important one nonetheless: always keep your paint tube covers screwed on when you're not painting. You want to keep all paint exposed to the air in the room or outside for as little time as possible

7. Squeeze out the right amount of paint. Do not bother squeezing all of the paint out on to your palette because there's a high chance some of it will have washed before you come round to using it. Only squeeze out a little bit of paint at a time so you do not end up with a load of paint on your palette that will end up going unused

8. When it comes to priming your canvas, only used an acrylic-based primer. Using an oil-based primer with acrylic paint will affect the paint and can change the way it looks, whereas using acrylic-based primer will have very minimal effects on the final look of the paint

4 Things For Beginner Artists To Remember

1. Uniqueness lasts It can take a while to find your artistic style and vision, but when you do find something that makes you unique, hold on to it. Take time to develop your works and make sure they all showcase something that is unique to you. If you try to imitate what's popular, you…

1. Uniqueness lasts

It can take a while to find your artistic style and vision, but when you do find something that makes you unique, hold on to it. Take time to develop your works and make sure they all showcase something that is unique to you. If you try to imitate what's popular, you may well experience some success, but it will likely be short-term success because something else will be popular in a few years' time. The key to long-term success is to always be unique because your uniqueness will last, whereas what's popular now might not last as long.

2. Everyone gets rejected

Rejection is something you definitely have to be prepared for as an artist. It's pretty much guaranteed that you will experience rejection at some point or other. When you do get rejected, what you have to do is to pick yourself up and put it behind you; move on to whatever's next and keep trying to get to where you want to get. If one door closes, there are still plenty of others that are open. Rejection may well in fact lead to something great.

3. Continue soaking up knowledge

You're not going to learn everything about art straight away. Art is a fascinating and extraordinarily rich subject with lots of branches. Be prepared to learn new things as you progress. The more you learn, the more you'll be able to appreciate other works of art, as well as your own. The piece you've just finished may be very different to the piece you did five years ago because all the knowledge about art you've soaked up has influenced your creative process. You may well want to push ahead with your own style, but do not be afraid to learn more about art, as it can greatly benefit you.

4. Be committed to working hard

Creating art is something that requires a lot of hard work. To create a really great piece of art, you have to have a vision of what it will be and once you have that vision, you have to dedicate a lot of time and energy to realizing this piece. It's very easy to start a piece and to leave it incomplete because you do not have the time or motivation to complete it. If you take the easy way out, you're not going to succeed. By all means if an artwork is not turning out how you want it to, move on to something else, but do not give up on something just because you have not got the time or motivation. A good artist will find the time and will be motivated enough to complete their works.

14 Fast Facts About Leonardo Da Vinci

1. Da Vinci was the first to explain why the sky is blue, having realized how the air scatters light about. 2. He is widely credited with coming up with the idea of ​​contact lenses, which he did so in his 1508 publication Codex of the eye, Manual D. 3. He was a vegetarian and…

1. Da Vinci was the first to explain why the sky is blue, having realized how the air scatters light about.

2. He is widely credited with coming up with the idea of ​​contact lenses, which he did so in his 1508 publication Codex of the eye, Manual D.

3. He was a vegetarian and believed animals should be free; as such, he would often purchase caged birds just so he could then set them free.

4. He created designs for many things that would have taken measurements to be realized, including helicopters, solar power technology, tanks and calculators, to name just a few.

5. He was fascinated with form and this fascination can be seen in one of his most famous pieces, The Vitruvian Man, which sets out the proportions of the human body.

6. One of the many things da Vinci studied was river erosion; from this he came to realize that the Earth was in fact older than what was claimed in the Bible.

7. He disproved another Biblical story by claiming that it was not Noah's ark that was responsible for fossils being found on mountainsides, but actually falling sea levels.

8. Though unduly one of the greatest creatives ever to have lived, da Vinci did not have a particularly high opinion of his many contributions to human knowledge.

9. Even though da Vinci is exceptionally famous for his paintings, just over a dozen are currently thought to still be in existence.

10. A number of da Vinci's designs have actually been built; some were found to work, while others were found to be impractical.

11. Making intensive notes was something that da Vinci had the habit of doing. Through his lifetime he made thousands upon thousands of pages of notes, including over 200 on corpses he gained permission to dissect.

12. Undoubtedly his most famous painting is the Mona Lisa. Arguably the most famous painting in the world, no one to this day knows exactly who the subject of the painting is. There have been plenty of theories put forward, of course, but none have proved yet.

13. At one point da Vinci was nearly sent to death for sodomy. No witnesses came forward to speak against him, so the case was dismissed and da Vinci was allowed to live.

14. The Mona Lisa has been on permanent display at the Louvre in Paris since 1797 and is seen by over 6 million people a year.

12 Fast Facts About Vincent Van Gogh

1. He was not interested in art for most of his life; it was not until he was 27 that he started painting, though he did many drawings through his childhood and early 20s. 2. He was not afraid to cast himself as the subject of his paintings, creating over 30 self-portraits in the space…

1. He was not interested in art for most of his life; it was not until he was 27 that he started painting, though he did many drawings through his childhood and early 20s.

2. He was not afraid to cast himself as the subject of his paintings, creating over 30 self-portraits in the space of four years.

3. The last 10 years of his life were extremely prolific; During this time, he created over 900 paintings, which works out at one painting every 40 days.

4. There are conflicting stories about the famous ear incident; It's commonly believed that Vincent cut off his own ear after having a fight with a friend, though others believe his friend friend Paul Gauguin, a famous painter in his own right, was responsible for cutting it off. Many believe his whole ear was cut off; in fact, it was only a small part of his ear lobe.

5. Unlike lots of other influential and famous artists, Van Gogh was mostly self-taught and had very little artistic training before he started creating his works.

6. However, he did attend an art school in Antwerp. He did this for a few months before his death. By this time in his life, he'd produced most of his masterpieces.

7. The Red Vineyard is the only painting he sold in his own lifetime; it was not until after he died that he started to gain popular appreciation and his paintings started to sell in huge numbers.

8. His most famous painting, arguably, is The Starry Night, which depicts the view from his bedroom at an asylum for the mentally ill in the French town of Saint-Remy-de-Provence.

9. Through his lifetime he suffers from various mental conditions. The culination of these afflictions occurred in 1890 when Vincent shot himself; he died two days later aged 37. However, some people claim he was actually shot by a local teenager.

10. Sunset at Montmajour was publicly unveiled in 2013 as the most recently discovered Van Gogh painting. It's now on display at the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam.

11. Vincent's closest friend was his brother Theo. He wrote over 800 letters to his brother through his life. Theo financially supported his brother while he tried to make himself a success. The two are buried side by side.

12. It's thanks to Theo's wife that we know of Vincent's work today. After Vincent's death, she became determined to make Vincent's works get the recognition she thought they deserved.

Unravelling the Phad

As the sun makes its sojourn downward, the delicately folded Phad is unveiled. A Phad is a 15-20 foot horizontal piece of cloth on which an entire folk tale is described. The stories commemorate deeds of local heroes. Usually the stories revolve around 2 main folk heroes – Pabuji and Devnarayan-ji. Devnarayan-ji was a 10th…

As the sun makes its sojourn downward, the delicately folded Phad is unveiled. A Phad is a 15-20 foot horizontal piece of cloth on which an entire folk tale is described. The stories commemorate deeds of local heroes. Usually the stories revolve around 2 main folk heroes – Pabuji and Devnarayan-ji.

Devnarayan-ji was a 10th century AD hero and was known to be an incarnation of Lord Vishnu. His story is said to be very similar to that of Krishna's. Pabuji, on the other hand, was a 14th century AD hero. He was a local Rajasthani who abandoned his wife at the marriage pyre to keep up his promise of helping a woman from the Charan community save her cows. During his attempt to save the last calf, he died in the battle. According to the folk tale, Pabuji is said to have ridden his horse for close to 10km after his head was slain. A temple was erect where his body finally fell dead. Both the men are titled as 'Cattle Heroes' who vehemently cooked for the cows of their community and ended up giving up their lives in the attempt. Cattle heroes are collectively called Bhomiyo. Only some Bhomiyo became famous and achieve divine status.

Today, renamed Phad painting artists like Prakash Joshi, are expanding and exploring the art form further by creating Phad paintings that narrate tales of Durga, Sati, Ramayana, Mahaveer, Buddha and even the Krishna-Leela series.

Till date the origin of the Phad remains a mystery. This is because once a Phad becomes old and worn out it is destroyed by ceremoniously submerging it into the sacred lake of Pushkar. This is ritual is known as Thandi Karna. Here is the earliest specimens of Phad paintings remain unavailable to us. The oldest Phad painting available today belong to the late 19th century.

A Phad is ideally only painted during the monsoon season. This is done with the belief that the folk lords are sleep during this time. Traditionally it is painted only by people of a special cast – Chippa, also called Joshi. Ideally only vegetable colors are used as paint for the Phad. This is because the natural colors remain fresh for a long duration. However, today the scarcities of these natural dyes compel Phad artists to use artificial or synthetic colors. While painting a Phad, only one color can be used at one time. Only once the complete usage of this color is done can the next color begin to be applied.

The initiation of a Phad painting is marked by a ceremony dedicated to Goddess Saraswati. Once a rough draft of the folk tale is drawn and perfected on the khadi cloth, all the figures are given a base color of yellow. This is called kachcha. Finally, the youngest virgin girl of the artist's family is summoned. She makes the very first stroke on the Phad. This ritual is followed by a distribution of sweets.

Every available inch of the khadi cloth is covered with figures. Although the characters are harmoniously painted across the cloth, the significance given to each character depends on the social status and the role that the character plays in the story. Another intriguing feature of a Phad is that, the characters never face the audience. All character represented on the cloth face each other.

A Phad painter does not paint the eyes of the main figure until he hands it over to the Bhopa. The Bhopa is the performer-priest who uses the Phad to perform the tale depicted on it. At the time of handing over of the Phad to the Bhopa, the painter draws the eyes of the main character and adds the name of the Bhopa to the Phad.

Traditionally, the art of painting a Phad was never taught to girls. The painters feared that the skill would stray out of their family when women who were taught the art were sent after marriage into other families. The men would pick up the skill as they would be handed paint and cloth while they were young to experiment and learn with. Most young boys would spend a lot of time around their fathers and thus automatically be gifted with a flair for the art.

Once the Phad is handed over to the Bhopa, the exquisitely painted Phad isrought alive with music, dance and narration. The Bhopas belong to the Bhopa caste and are the men who perform the tale depicted on the Phad. The Bhopa usually adorns a red baga (Skirt), Safa (Turban), a red bagatari (A long Shirt) and ties Ghunghroo (anklets with bells) to his ankles. He uses traditional instruments like the ravanhatta or jantar to sing the folk songs. He is assisted by his wife, the Bhopi, who holds an oil lamp and illuminates different parts of the Phad as the Bhopa sings and dances. Using the intricately designed Phad the Bhopa, the performer priest begins the Phad Bachna – 'Narration of the legend'. The Bhopa usually begins the narration by singing the lura, which refers to hymns of the folk hero. The performance begins once the sun sets and continues till sunrise. It takes up to 4-7 nights of performances to complete the narration of a single tale. Traditionally the Bhopa and Bhopi used to travel from one village to another, pitching their Phad at a central location in the village and performing it for locals.

Unfortunately, today India is left with only about 13 traditional Phad painting artists. People do not understand the value or the intricate work that goes into making a Phad. Prakash Joshi is currently the best known Phad artist in the world. He hails from one of the only surviving families of Phad artists – the Joshi clan. In 2009, he received the National Award (President Award) for his contribution to the dying art form. Prakash Joshi dedicates his time to teaching this traditional art form at Joshi Kala Mandir in Bhilwara, Rajasthan. He travels to 5-6 cities in a year to conduct exhibitions and workshops. Most Phad artists today earn income from exhibitions, workshops and classes. Artists like Prakash Joshi are heartbroken at the current social value of Phad paintings. He believes that the government must put more effort in the form of funding and sponsorship to Phad artists. Phad artists are often called by the government to conduct 3-4month workshops in teaching the art. However, these artists are bound for this time period by a contract that restricts them to take up any other external work in terms of workshops or exhibitions. Prakash Joshi claims that this arrangement is not financially viable for Phad artists as most of their income and networking happens during exhibitions and workshops.

Also, the market today does not give sufficient exposure to the Phad art form. For most consumers the cloth becomes a mere add-on accessory to the interiors of a room. “Majority of my customers today select a Phad based on whether it matches their wall colors or not. I teach my students this sacred tradition in a hope to revive the art in its true sense”, claims Prakash Joshi.

It is a pity to note that such a rich cultural legacy is vanishing at such a rapid rate. The creation and presentation of the Phad is more than just an entertaining activity. The entire procedure from the first stroke on the cloth to the last step of the Bhopa is done undertaken with a spiritual deduction. During the performance of the Phad the Bhopa becomes a priest and the Phad becomes a mobile shrine.

Plein Air Painting: How To Deal With Changing Light

1. Effects of changing light When painting en plein air, you have to take the move of the sun into account. As the sun moves across the sky, it can greatly affect how a landscape looks. Take a photo from the same spot every hour through the day then look back at these photos and…

1. Effects of changing light

When painting en plein air, you have to take the move of the sun into account. As the sun moves across the sky, it can greatly affect how a landscape looks. Take a photo from the same spot every hour through the day then look back at these photos and you'll see just how much the passing sun affects the lighting of the landscape. Capturing an outdoor landscape can be hard when light gradually changes through the day. Even though capturing the changing effects of light can be challenging, it is not impossible.

2. Where to start

When it comes to actually doing your plein air painting, a good idea is to get the features of the painting done first. In other words, concentrate on the make-up of the painting by creating the shapes of the landscape's different features. Get the larger elements of the painting done first, then you can focus on the finer details. You could even get the larger details and shapes done on one day and come back another day to get the light effects done.

3. How to capture changing light

If you take your time with your painting and spend a full day working on it, you may well end up with a painting that shows different effects of light from throughout the day. That's fine if you're aiming for a painting that shows the different effects of light on a landscape, but if you want to capture the landscape at a precise time, you have to do things a bit differently. A good way to approach this is to take photos of the landscape. You can then work from these photos, using them as a reference guide to see how light affects different features of the landscape.

4. Consider a series of paintings

Instead of capturing light's effects at a single moment, you could try a series of paintings, each one showing the effects of light on the landscape at a different time of the day. Doing this can make you appreciate just how much the light effects a landscape through the day. You could do a painting in the morning, one at midday then one in the early evening, for example. You do not need to have a series of paintings of exactly the same view; you could still showcase the changing effects of light through the day even if you do not do paintings of the exact same view.

Painting: A Hobby Seniors Can Take Up to Remain Creative

Standing at the dawn of your youth, a bandana covering the forehead, staring at the sunset with a paint brush in your hand, an easel in front of you, and the canvas stretched out neatly, making that first stroke, watching the color spread out one thick stroke at a time. We have all had this…

Standing at the dawn of your youth, a bandana covering the forehead, staring at the sunset with a paint brush in your hand, an easel in front of you, and the canvas stretched out neatly, making that first stroke, watching the color spread out one thick stroke at a time. We have all had this lush imagination in our daydreams at least once in our lives.

What stopped us half the time were thoughts such as 'Me and painting, oh come on!' and 'I have never even tried doodling!' or the '… maybe later, when I am away from all the stress' ones. Well, what's keeping you now? You have retired from your life of stress and deadlines, your days and nights are filled with time and lots of free time. This is the perfect time to pursue that hobby you have wished to try on since forever, or brush up that old pastime you kept away for fear it might eat into your work schedule. It is important to have a creative hobby as you age for it will rejuvenate your brain and in the course, freshen up your thought process.

Start simple, no need to get expensive paints or fancy easel in the beginning. Get yourself a sketch book, some HB pencils, a beginner's kit of watercolours. Now start with something simple, draw those tiny houses with hills in the background, a rising sun, a flock of 'r' shaped birds. Remember how it felt when you were a kid, drawing them on the back of your notebooks and along the borders of your textbooks. It is the same, creativity has no age limit. Free your mind from prejudices, nobody is expecting you to be a Van Gogh or Picasso. Make every stroke to feed your creative inner child. Now mix up those watercolors, forget getting the precursors for now, just have fun. Paint as much as you can, fill the frame, make it vibrant.

As you start feeling like you are getting a hang of the strokes, start looking up references. Famous paintings and portraits, trace over them or give it a freehand try. They might not look similar, but hey it will be something unique that you create. The happiness that sprouts from watching a handmade work of yours; that is the best feeling you can get at any age in your life. Show them to your grandchildren, for they will relate to it much better. As them for suggestions and themes and draw them the picture of that 'leopard eating grapes on a paddy field'. Gift them the neatly framed painting on their next birthday and watch them go “WOAH!”. The art of painting dates back to the stone-ages, but do not feel like it is out dated or out of fashion, for all that creativity impulses inside you has come out in one way or other. Painting is a good mental exercise as well as one for your wrists as it puts every single nerve in your hands to good use to make sure that you get that perfect stroke. Wait no longer, get out there, and go paint the city red!

The Secrets To Developing Your Own Style

1. Start with what you love You do not just choose your style; your style is something that comes to you as you create art. The best way to go about developing your style is to start with what you love and go from there. If you've been creating art and you know what you…

1. Start with what you love

You do not just choose your style; your style is something that comes to you as you create art. The best way to go about developing your style is to start with what you love and go from there. If you've been creating art and you know what you love, simply go for that. If you're not too sure, simply create lots of art and experiment in lots of different ways. Being versatile in your art is a good way of helping you realize what particular type of art you love above all others. If you create lots of different types of art, you should sooner or later come across something that you find really appealing.

2. Create lots of art

What your love is the basis for developing your style. Once you've got this, you can go about exploring and developing your style. Work as much as you can and create as many pieces as you can. The more you create, the more your style will develop, evolve and grow. It's worth bearing in mind that it can take a long time for you to develop a unique style. Many artists spend years creating art in order to find their unique style – finding your style can be a long process and can therefore require a lot of your time and patience.

3. Think about what sets you apart from others

Pick an artist and look at their works to gain an idea of ​​what their style is. What sets this artist apart from others? What's unique about this artist's style? Is there something common to all this artist's pieces? Ask yourself these questions to give yourself an idea of ​​how artists make themselves stand out. Then ask yourself these questions about your own works: what sets you apart from others? What's unique about your style? Is there something common to your pieces?

4. Be prepared for your style to change

If you know what your style is and you're confident it makes you stand out from the crowd, great. What you have to be prepared for is for your style to change and evolve over time. Some artists are happy to find their style and work with it for the rest of their careers. For others, sticking to one way of creating is not enough to satisfy their creative needs; they feel the need to always push their creativity and experiment with new styles. Even if you're happy to stick with one style, you should be prepared for change, as changes may ever show themselves in your works.