5 Easy Ways To Expand Your Knowledge Of Art

1 – Read, read, read There is a ton of literature about pretty much everything to do with art out there. Head to your local library and you'll find plenty of books on art. But where do you begin? You do not want to start by reading up on a very specific branch of art.…

1 – Read, read, read

There is a ton of literature about pretty much everything to do with art out there. Head to your local library and you'll find plenty of books on art. But where do you begin? You do not want to start by reading up on a very specific branch of art. Instead, find a book for beginners that's very broad and offers more of a general overview of art without going into too much detail. You want a book that explains things clearly but is still informative and interesting. Look online as well for books on art. If you're keen on practicing art, you'll find plenty of useful books and guides for beginners, as well as plenty for more advanced artists.

2 – Visit galleries

A great way to expand your knowledge of art is to visit art galleries. Most galleries display works of art with a short overview of the work. Many galleries offer audio comments that are available via headsets or some other device that you can borrow. Listening to the comments is a lot more useful and informative because they delve into more detail about the works and different genres and periods of art that are represented in the gallery. Visiting galleries offers the chance to view all sorts of art works – you never know what you might come across.

3 – Join an art club

Joining an art club can be great fun. It can also be really useful because you're spending time with likeminded people who have something in common with you: a love of art. Even if you're a complete beginner, art clubs can be a great way to expand your art knowledge because you've got a group of people right there. Everyone's different – get speaking to people about art and you'll find yourself picking up lots of tips and hints. Do not worry about going if you do not know anything about art – except the club specifically states it's for professionals, you'll be made to feel welcome. People do love it when newbies come along because they're interested in art!

4 – Do an art course

Doing an art course offers a more academic approach to art. Whilst art clubs tend to be more relaxed and less formal, art courses tend to be more focused and educational. You're likely to have lots of information thrown at you, no matter what sort of art course you take, whether it's art history or practicing art, for example. The great thing about art courses is that the emphasis is on learning. Man courses will also offer you the chance to study more in-depth branches of art.

5 – Learn by practicing

You can appreciate works of art by looking at them. However, you can only understand the creative process once you've created art works of your own. The only way to understand everything about a painting is for you yourself to have some painting experience, for example. Practicing art gives you experience that you can not get from reading. It gives you a much better understanding of what goes into creating a work of art.

Reality As It Doesn’t Look

Even at its most hyper-realistic-looking, art isn’t about the surface. It’s about everything underneath the surface.

Even at its most hyper-realistic-looking, art isn’t about the surface. It’s about everything underneath the surface.

4 Ways To Decide What To Paint

1. Find something you've never painted before If, for example, all of your paintings are of summer landscapes, why not try a winter landscape? If you always paint cities, why not paint the countryside for a change? If you always use oils, why not give watercolors or acrylic a go? Many artists get stuck for…

1. Find something you've never painted before

If, for example, all of your paintings are of summer landscapes, why not try a winter landscape? If you always paint cities, why not paint the countryside for a change? If you always use oils, why not give watercolors or acrylic a go? Many artists get stuck for something to paint because they're used to painting the same thing again and again; they find they can not do anything else with what they already know. Think outside of the box; expand your horizons and explore new things. You'll soon find that there's always something you've never tried, so go ahead and try it.

2. Visit somewhere you've never been before

Visiting somewhere new is a really good way to find something new to paint. When visiting a new place, you never know what wonders await you. Even if you paint from your imagination and not from real life, going somewhere new and exploring it can give you lots of great ideas about what to paint. Seeing new things stimulates the mind and gives your creativity a boost. To generate new ideas, you have to have new input. If you keep to the same routine, seeing the same things day in, day out, you're going to find it hard to come up with new and fresh ideas of what to paint. Visiting somewhere new is one way of keeping things exciting and making sure you're getting the chance to come up with new ideas.

3. See what other artists are doing

A simple way of finding something to paint is to look at works by other artists. You can look at artists that produce similar works to yours or look at artists whose work is completely different; Either way, you're bound to get a few ideas of what to paint. Visit galleries and have a good few hours wandering round and having a look at the different art works on display. Find some artists who works you've never seen before and look their works up – you never know what sort of inspirational works might be waiting for you out there. Art is full of ideas that are passed back and forth; dive into the art world and look at lots of works and you'll see there are loads of ideas for paintings.

4. Look right in front of you

Go to where it is you usually paint and look right in front of you. Paint whatever it is you see. Once you've done, have a look round and paint something else. You've been surprised how many artists do not do this. Many look for inspiration and ideas of what to paint in all sorts of places; they never look right in front of them. In other words, they never look to the ordinary and mundane things that you see every day. Paint something that's right in front of you but you never notice because it's plain and boring, something you see all the time but just ignore. You never know what types of ideas you can get from doing this. Learning to appreciate your immediate surroundings by painting them can help you see new things to paint in the wider world around you.

How to Not Mix Contemporary Indian Art With the Other Styles

What is more to contemporary Indian art than simply colors, brushes and a canvas? Well, this is something very difficult to fathom, let alone explain it in plain words. From the cave paintings of prehistoric times to the incredible creations of modern-day – the craft has evolved mightily. The concepts of it are getting more…

What is more to contemporary Indian art than simply colors, brushes and a canvas? Well, this is something very difficult to fathom, let alone explain it in plain words. From the cave paintings of prehistoric times to the incredible creations of modern-day – the craft has evolved mightily.

The concepts of it are getting more and more intricate with each passing day. Unique ideas are pouring in from every nook and corner of this planet. How artists perceive vistas and depict them on canvases freshly every time is a thing of big interest. Of course, a common person can never gravitate the styles they use in their masterpieces. He needs someone to explain and described about these details. So, here are a few things you might want to know if you are visiting an art gallery soon:

Modernism:

In pain tongue, modernism is a break taken from conventional styles of painting. It is not bound to any traditional rules and so, lacks a proper definition as such. It will be irrefutable to tag modernism to a unified theme because it is a mixture of a range of forms – from realistic portraiture to whimsical, Dadaism and even Pop-art.

This fusion of a plethora of different styles is the very precursor of contemporary Indian art. However, even today, the latter form highlights hints of modernism very evidently, and the two forms often overlap, knowingly or unknowingly.

Impressionism:

It started in nineteenth century Paris and has since, the eyes of many artists in the country. The style pronounces thin strokes of brush, common objects or vistas as the subjects, and weird angles on depiction. An impressionist sees a scope of creation in almost everything – from a regular-looking landscape to a run-of-the-mill walkway.

The color combinations are queer, too. Artists usually ditch black or other dark tones. There is a lot of mixing done to come up with unique shades. The motive is to have the perfect color and the perfect reflection for every object in the painting, natural light being the most important aspect. When you see these details, know that you are miles away from contemporary Indian art.

Expressionism:

It is all about the human heart, its emotions, and lucid depiction in colors. The illustration happens from the perspective of the subject. It is one way of depicting the emotional state of mind of the subject that resonates with that of the artist. The motive is to evoke an emotional ting within a viewer. Expressionism is one of the vital aspects of the present-day prevailing form.

Surrealism:

This aspect is fast becoming the trend among present-time artists. Abstract painting heavily influences it. Moreover, it was, in fact, a radical movement of the twenty century. 'Elements of surprise' are its biggest features, closely followed by the concept of 'juxtaposition.' Surrealism depicts irrationality, automatism, madness, grotesque, and fantasy carved out of reality. Modern-day painters deeply worship this style and use it in their creations to conjure up masterpieces.

Cubism:

The style is very dependent on the geometry of the subject. It thrives on the concept that everything on this planet takes a certain form of the other for its existence. Indeed, the creations that result from cubism are fusions of the real shape of the subject along with some other shapes. Famous artists of yore, like Picasso and Gris were huge advocates of the style. And yes, cubism is still influencing contemporary Indian art.

Other than these aspects, varied cultures also influence the modern style very deeply. Each creation has its own freshness and taste; each has the blessing of a special, discrete style. Inspirations are many, but the charisma renews every time. So, the next time when you visit a gallery, make sure to look for these details to find out which style you are viewing.

4 Ways To Overcome Artist’s Block

1. Draw inspiration from past experiences A great way to kickstart your motivation is to go over memories of past experiences. This can be especially helpful if you use your memories in creating your works. Think about times in your childhood and events through your life that you're particularly fond of. Many artists take their…

1. Draw inspiration from past experiences

A great way to kickstart your motivation is to go over memories of past experiences. This can be especially helpful if you use your memories in creating your works. Think about times in your childhood and events through your life that you're particularly fond of. Many artists take their past experiences and channel them into creating wonderful works of art. Whether you do this or not, reliving past experiences can help you feel motivated and inspired.

2. Draw inspiration from past works

Look over some of your past works. Think about what went into creating them and how you managed to finish these works. Every work has lots of ideas behind it. Looking through past works can help you find ideas that you've forgotten about; you might have pieces that are unfinished, for example. Even if a piece is unfinished, the ideas behind that piece are still there for you to use, so take those ideas and use them in a new piece. This is one of the reasons why doing regular pieces of work is very helpful, so you can go back and recycle any ideas you may have had but discarded for whatever reason.

3. Have several works on the go at the same time

For a lot of people, it's true what they say: the more you have to do the more you'll get done. Try working on more than one piece at the same time. You could start a piece, then start another while you wait for the first one to dry so you can go over it and make a few adjustments. Having more than one project to think about can boost productivity simply because you've given yourself more to do. It can also be beneficial for your works because it gives you more of a chance to think about your works and what can be done to them.

4. Look at the works of others

One of the easiest ways to get over artist's block is to simply look at works created by other people. There are innumerable talented artists from all over the world who have channeled their creativity into producing wonderful pieces of art. Visit any gallery and you'll walk away feeling inspired to do what they do and create wonderful works for others to admire. When a particular piece of art inspires you, read up on it and learn about what went into creating it. Study artists and how their life experiences inspired them to paint. Then use your experiences and channel them into creating great works.

4 Things To Consider When Travelling For Plein Air Painting

1. Traveling by car Traveling by car for plein air painting is quite simple. All you have to do is to make sure that all of your supplies are carefully packed. It's a good idea to put any supplies you can on the floor behind the front seats, or on the floor in front of…

1. Traveling by car

Traveling by car for plein air painting is quite simple. All you have to do is to make sure that all of your supplies are carefully packed. It's a good idea to put any supplies you can on the floor behind the front seats, or on the floor in front of the passenger seat next to the driver's seat. This way, if for some reason you have to make lots of tight turns, there's less of a chance of your supplies sliding from side to side and getting damaged. You want to make sure your supplies are going to and from your destination in one piece.

2. Traveling by plane

Traveling by plane with supplies for plein air painting requires a bit more planning. There are three options: you can carry your supplies with you, you can have your supplies shipped to where you'll be staying, or you can purchase your supplies over there. When carrying your supplies with you, it's important to pack them well and not to go over any weight restrictions, otherwise you could face additional charges. You'll probably need two suitcases: one for your supplies and one for your clothes and other necessities. Having your supplies shipped can be more expensive, but at the same time it's a lot more hassle-free. If you're buying your supplies there, you've got to work out how you're going to get them home, unless of course you dispose of them once you're done, but then you will not have gotten full use out of them. Remember that paint thinner is never allowed on airplanes.

3. Traveling by bus

Traveling with plein air painting supplies on buses can be quite cumbersome, especially if you've got lots of equipment with you. For a good and productive plein air painting session, you're going to need a fair few supplies and there might not be much room for these on buses, especially if it gets busy. The problem with buses is that they do not have much room for luggage. If you know the bus is going to be quiet, by all means use it because there will be plenty of room. If you can drive or even walk to your destination, it's probably easier driving or walking than getting the bus because you know you'll be able to get your supplies to your destination and back without problems.

4. Traveling by train

It's quite easy traveling by train with plein air painting supplies because trains have plenty of room for you to store your luggage. If the train's quiet, you can even keep your luggage on the seat next to you. If you're doing a day trip, you're dependent on schedules – the same applies if you're traveling by bus – so you might only have a set amount of time to work. If you can work it so you have more than enough time for plein air painting, great, but if the schedules are not in your favor, consider an overnight stay so you have plenty of time in your chosen destination.

4 Watercolour Painting Tips For Beginners

1. Transparency One of the key properties of watercolour paint is that it's transparent. This is important to bear in mind, because it means that you can see through the layers of paint. It also means that you can not cover mistakes up by going over them – try to go over a mistake and…

1. Transparency

One of the key properties of watercolour paint is that it's transparent. This is important to bear in mind, because it means that you can see through the layers of paint. It also means that you can not cover mistakes up by going over them – try to go over a mistake and you'll still be able to see the paint you're trying to cover up. Watercolour paint's transparency gives paintings a sort of ethereal quality, which is why many choose to use it.

2. Color change

Part of mastering painting with watercolours is being able to get the exact color you want. One of the problems with watercolors is that, when watercolour paint dries, it always looks a lot paler and lighter when dry; when it's wet, on the other hand, it's usually a lot darker. Bear this in mind when creating your painting, so you get the colors you want. If a layer of paint comes out too light, you can always paint another layer on top of it. Get a piece of paper and do a few tests to make sure the color that comes out is the one you want.

3. Fast drying time

Watercolour paint can dry very fast. When painting with watercolours, you should be prepared to work quickly. You can apply retarders and other mediums to the paint to slow down its drying time, giving you more time to work with the paint before it starts drying off. If you're thinking of working with paint that dries quickly, it's a good idea to do a bit of pre-planning. Once you know how you're going to approach the painting and have thought about everything you're going to do you can just go ahead and complete the painting without the fast drying time affecting your work.

4. Solubility

When you're painting with watercolors, you should be careful not to touch any areas that you've already finished. The reason for this is because watercolour paint remains soluble even once it's dried. If you've finished a section of a painting and your paintbrush, loaded with watercolour paint, comes into contact with the dried area, the paint in the stripped area will revert back into paint. However, you can use the paint's solubility to your advantage: you can touch up a stripped area to fix a mistake, remove some paint to make the color a bit lighter or mix more color into it.

5 Advantages Of Digital Paintings

Digital painting has taken off in the past few years. There are loads of high-quality apps for tablets and mobile devices that have made digital painting a lot more accessible and worthwhile. While it’s not the same as normal painting, there are still many reasons why digital painting has become popular. Here are 5 advantages…

Digital painting has taken off in the past few years. There are loads of high-quality apps for tablets and mobile devices that have made digital painting a lot more accessible and worthwhile. While it’s not the same as normal painting, there are still many reasons why digital painting has become popular. Here are 5 advantages of digital painting:

Is That Art Print Humble?

Making your prints available online is the clearest possible way to reach out to a large number of people who appreciate your art and would like to keep it in their hands. It does not de-valuate the original work or make it any less important. Online prints only just increase the outreach of an artist’s…

Making your prints available online is the clearest possible way to reach out to a large number of people who appreciate your art and would like to keep it in their hands. It does not de-valuate the original work or make it any less important. Online prints only just increase the outreach of an artist’s precious work to an increasing number of homes.

The Perfect Subject

Is there such a thing-the “perfect” subject to paint– on any given day? Like song-choice for a musician, the subject an artist chooses to paint carries his / her personality, abilities and message to the viewers who will see it. Possibilities abound: perhaps a 300-foot tumbling waterfall, the sun poised on a dramatic orange horizon,…

Is there such a thing-the “perfect” subject to paint– on any given day?

Like song-choice for a musician, the subject an artist chooses to paint carries his / her personality, abilities and message to the viewers who will see it. Possibilities abound: perhaps a 300-foot tumbling waterfall, the sun poised on a dramatic orange horizon, or that striking profile of a most beautiful model. What really makes for a “perfect” subject?

Let's see what some other artists say on that “subject:”

“The subject itself is no account; what matters is the way it is presented.” (Raoul Dufy)

“Content is more than 'subject matter.' It is all the feelings and ideas you bring to your painting. ” (Rene Huyghe)

“There has to be that magical 'urge' and excitement to paint the subject, or it just will not work.” (Randall Sexton)

“Just because it is there, does not mean you have to paint it.” (CJ Rider)

When I'm seeking a subject to paint, it is often an outgrowth of my attitude or mindset that day, or week. It might be inspired by an idea I have been carrying around for awhile. Or it just “happens”: some transcendent impression of a greater reality is conveyed to me that urges me to explore that. With my best paintings, it looks that the subject reaches out to choose me – it demands that I paint it. But over the years, painting in plein air or the studio, observing subjects from the farm, figure or in the field, I have learned that it's not the subject itself that will be painted – it's what I want to say about it, and how I will say it, that will result in the greatest impression on the canvas and for the viewer.

When choosing what to do next in their college courses, or in their personal lives, or in their careers, I have told my daughters, “choose to WIN” Ask yourself, “What's Important Now?” –then do that. That is an aid to stay focused, look at the Big Picture, and avoid getting frustrated or sidelined by details.

When selecting subjects for painting, I choose “WIL.” Before I begin, and when it comes to sorting out the significant from the stuff, the lasting from the less, the memorable from the minute, I remind myself that I most need to focus on “What's Important Long-Term?” A painting that will be remembered will be invested with the love of the artist for life and living, his passion for his subject, and a clear message about his reactions to it. It will be obvious that he has made choices, and prioritized certain elements from all that he could have painted. The result is stunning, spectacular, or, in a more intimate way, personally striking. There is a new and unique connection between the artist and his audience. How might we more consistently do that as artists, to create that electric connection?

The artist making a memorable painting has decided to create a certain interpretation of a particular subject. His or her excitement about that subject drives every decision in the creative process. “How” the artwork is done grows out of the purpose for that artwork, the artist's desire to produce the clearest translation of his idea, which will produce maximum visual and emotional impact. A forgettable painting has usually been done before, and its subject is one that is usually obvious. Without a unique vision for a subject, and / or a deep emotional response to it, only its obvious appearance is visible to the artist – an exterior that is visible to everyone. But a memorable painting is full of life, and speaks of the artist's priorities and passion in expressing that same subject in a unique and insightful way. My hope and dream is that those who see my work will remember it because it is purposeful, passionate and personal.

“It is only with the heart that one can see rightly.” –Antoine de Sainte-Exupery

It’s Only Paint and Canvas

What is the true “market value” of a painting? How does a potential collector know that a fair price is being offered? After all, the price can be negotiated … It's not like a car, a stereo system, or a suit jacket that contains technical components and can be shopped between stores. It's only paint…

What is the true “market value” of a painting? How does a potential collector know that a fair price is being offered? After all, the price can be negotiated … It's not like a car, a stereo system, or a suit jacket that contains technical components and can be shopped between stores. It's only paint and canvas, right?

Lines, colors, shapes, usually on a flat rectangular surface: that's how we most often define “a painting.” As an objet d'art it has perceived value, both inside and out of the marketplace. Often paintings contain little or no moving parts. Precious metals may be employed, but not usually-it's simply canvas by-the-yard and pigment. The materials of which a painting is made today are not much different than they were thousands of years ago, when early man painted and engraved shapes of animals on cave walls, with crushed plants and vegetable matter for paint, and animal-fat crayons and fingertips for brushes. The technology of paint-making and the variety of painting surfaces have significantly improved since then, but paint is still made of pigments and the surface of a painting is still usually flat. Does not sound that impressive, does it?

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“The synthesis of truth and beauty … is the highest and deepest reality.” Ovid

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Let's consider the work of those early artists, at places like Lascaux and Altamira: they were the agents of man's first recorded history. Their wall paintings speak to us through the millennia, even though their materials were elemental. Those artworks still communicate human ideas, perceptions, the very milieu in which early men and women lived. Those paintings today give us an insight into a culture, basal psychology, and the soul of early man. Those artworks were – as all artworks have been since those first paintings were created-visions, thoughts, dreams, and an exploration of what it means to be human. Those paintings in sedimentary sanctuaries were not-and are not now-simply colored dirt on stone: they are the reality of a time gone by.

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“We keep our eyes on the things we can not see: for the things which we can see are temporal; the things that are unseen are eternal.” 2 Corinthians 4:18

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It's the vision encapsulated in those ancient artworks that give them their true value, not the materials with which they are made. Then as now, it is the material that gives the immaterial form and meaning, and which gives any painting its value. How well a contemporary artwork does that for each viewer or potential collector in today's marketplace, how deeply the painting establishes a personal connection, is what gives the work its significance and worth. Paintings enable us to see more than the obvious, to break free of our prejudices, to elevate our thoughts. The author Charlotte Bronte expressed this ability of the artist to help us “see” on a higher plane: “I try to avoid looking forward or backward, and try to keep looking upward.”

The artist is the catalyst in this process of Imagineering and Revelation. It is through the artist's eye that new possibilities can be discovered, and comprehended. In fact, former President John F. Kennedy underlined that creative significance: “I see little of more importance to the future of our country and civilization than full recognition of the place of the artist. , society must set the artist free to follow his vision wherever it takes him. ” The painter does what the director does for a film, or the composer for a symphony. He or she draws unrelated concepts together, instills pattern, variety and unity, and discloses the essence of an idea. If we look through the painter's lens, we are valued to a new perspective on reality. The visionary artist is a conductor on the journey to an exotic destination. We begin to understand that there is something higher in that artwork, than just paint and canvas.

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“An artist is not paid for his labor, but for his vision.” James Abbot McNeill Whistler

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For a painting, it is the experience of the artist expressed therein that is of utmost value. The material nature of the work is quite secondary. A painting that conveys the power of emotion to the viewer is more than “just paint and canvas.” It is the description of a heartfelt concept that has been forged into tangible excellence through a creative process of envisioning and technical facility. It even has the power to change lives. “(Art) has the capacity to penetrate even the most callous skin and to ignite a revolution from within,” as musician Benjamin Moore so eloquently reminds us. Pursuing art with our whole hearts and minds is probably the most civil undertaking we can do as artists. “What a privilege it is to be able to take brush in hand and put paint on paper in this troubled world,” is our encouragement from artist Veronica Stensby.

A painting's value is not in its material nature, as “just paint and canvas.” Rather, it is the vision an artist expresses with those materials that is of value: that slice of heaven, the best of the Best, that idea of ​​the Ideal, that is the central core of both the material and spiritual worth of an artwork.

Top 3 Useful iPad Apps For Painters

1. Art Set As its name suggests, this app is all about giving your iPad its very own art set. With this app you get a great range of art supplies, including paints, pastels, pens and pencils, as well as a variety of different paper types and colors to work on. You can even import…

1. Art Set

As its name suggests, this app is all about giving your iPad its very own art set. With this app you get a great range of art supplies, including paints, pastels, pens and pencils, as well as a variety of different paper types and colors to work on. You can even import your own photos and have them as a backdrop to work on. One of the great things about this app is the attention to detail: all of the paintings and other supplies look and act very realistically. The graphics are of such a high quality that it's like having a genuine art set in front of you. You'll find this app easy to use – it's designed to be accessible to people of all skill levels, whether beginner or expert. This is a paid app with two versions: the basic one, which is the cheaper one, and the more advanced pro version, which is a bit more expensive.

2. Inspire Pro

This app is designed to be used by artists of all skills levels. There are 70 brushes to choose from, with six categories: marks, wax crayons, chalk, graphite pencils, basic shapes, airbrushes and oil paint. All the brushes in each of these six categories can be used as an eraser, a dry brush or a wet brush. This app has been meticulously designed to offer a high-quality and realistic painting experience; what's marked as this app's best feature is its ability to blend colors together, whether it's creating a blur here and there or taking two colors and mixing them together to create a new one. There are many other features, including 17 brush settings, canvas playback video recording, pressure sensitive stylus support and the ability to import and export all your paintings.

3. SketchBook Pro

SktechBook Pro is one of the more advanced painting apps that lets you create highly detailed works of digital art. It's ideal for professionals who already have some experience with this type of app and are looking for something with lots of features; it's also ideal for those who are serious about creating great art on their iPad. Having said all that, it's still accessible for beginners, though it may take a bit of time for beginners to get used to the app's many different features. There are lots of canvas options to choose from, as well as plenty of brush choices. You can blend colors together with ease and create multi-layered pieces without fuss; there are also features that make use of your tablet's touchscreen and screen sensitivity.

6 Ways To Improve Your Painting Skills

1. Practice If you want to be a good painter, you should be prepared to invest a lot of time and effort into it. By practicing regularly, you'll build up your skills and learn new things along the way. Do some painting every single day, even if it's just half an hour here and there.…

1. Practice

If you want to be a good painter, you should be prepared to invest a lot of time and effort into it. By practicing regularly, you'll build up your skills and learn new things along the way. Do some painting every single day, even if it's just half an hour here and there. The more you practice, the more mistakes you'll make; the more mistakes you make, the more opportunities you have to learn something new.

2. Learn About Painting

When you pick up a paintbrush for the first time, you're more than likely not going to be able to create intricate and enchanting pieces of work. Creating a beautiful painting is something that requires a lot of thought and a lot of knowledge about how paintings are created. You may very well be adept at picking up a paintbrush and creating a painting right then and there, but the more you learn about painting, the more your skills are going to improve.

3. Get Better Supplies

When it comes to art supplies, it can definitely be worth investing in more expensive supplies. Not only do they last a lot longer, they're also of a higher quality. Take colors, for example. If you buy student grade colors, which are the cheaper ones, there is not as much variety as there is with artist grade colors, which are the more expensive of the two. Spending a bit extra on supplies can open up a lot more opportunities for how you approach your paintings; it can also give you more freedom to explore your ideas.

4. Use All Of Your Supplies To Their Full Potential

You've probably got lots of supplies lying about that never get used. You never know, they may well come in handy, so see if you can use them. A ruler, for example, can help you create a grid that can help you place everything in your painting more accurately. Do some research on how different supplies can help with painting and you'll be surprised to learn how many different items artists use to help them.

5. Get Critiques From Others

It always helps to get a second opinion. In fact, the more opinions you can get, the better. Even if you try to critique your own work, you're not completely unbiased because it's your own work. Get outside opinions: people will tell you what you could be doing better and they will encourage you to keep trying. It's best to get critiques from artists who are more experienced than you; the opinions they have may seem overly critical, but all criticism helps because it alerts you to things you could be doing better.

6. Plan Ahead

Doing paintings spontaneously is great, but a great way to improve your painting skills is to plan ahead. By doing this, you're giving yourself a chance to think about how you're going to approach your painting. You can work out what styles and techniques you're going to use to create the effects you want. You can even do rough sketches to give yourself an idea of ​​how to scale everything. Planning ahead gives you the advantage of time: with more time to work on a painting, you can afford to consider and explore more ideas.

5 Benefits Of Painting

Painting is a wonderful hobby and pastime. It can also be a great career for those lucky enough to make it as a professional painter. Whether you paint for work or just for fun, there are lots of benefits of painting, and here are 5 of them:

Painting is a wonderful hobby and pastime. It can also be a great career for those lucky enough to make it as a professional painter. Whether you paint for work or just for fun, there are lots of benefits of painting, and here are 5 of them:

Why The Paint Tube Is Important

1. Before the paint tube We take it for granted that our paint comes in handy tubes because that was not always the case. It was only in the 19th century that the paint tube was invented. American painter John Goffe Rand is credited with having invented a tin tube sealed with a screw cap…

1. Before the paint tube

We take it for granted that our paint comes in handy tubes because that was not always the case. It was only in the 19th century that the paint tube was invented. American painter John Goffe Rand is credited with having invented a tin tube sealed with a screw cap that allowed for oil paint to be stored and transported without it drying out and becoming unusable. Before that, artists would have to mix their own paintings and store them in pig bladders. The bladder would be tied up then pricked with a tack to release the paint; in 1822 English painter James Hams invented the glass syringe with a plunger to squeeze the paint out. The paint tube then came along and was by far the most convenient way to store and transport paint.

2. Plein air painting

The invention of the paint tube made it a lot easier for artists to vent outdoors to work. Plein air painting, the practice of going outdoors to paint the world as you see it, took off in popularity because of the paint tube. Artists did go outside to work before the paint tube was invented, although plein air painting became a lot more accessible thanks to the paint tube, which was a much better and more convenient option than pig bladders which could very easily burst open.

3. Impressionism

Impressionism is an art movement that started in the 19th century. It originated in Paris in the late 19th century, around the same time that plein air was gaining popularity. Impressionism is characterized by thin brushstrokes that were applied rapidly; the subject matter is scenes from typical urban and suburban life. Movement of some sort very often featured. Light and the different effects it had throughout the day was also a key component of Impressionist paintings. Impressionism grew to become one of the major art movements and has had a vast impact on modern art. Pierre-Auguste Renoir, a leading French Impressionist painter said, 'without tubes of paint, there would have been no impressionism'.

4. Colors

One of the best things about the invention of the paint tube is that it paved the way for lots more colors to be used. Paints, especially oil paints, took a long time to produce, so it was common practice for artists to only produce a few colors to work with. Artists who painted outdoor would only be able to take a few colors with them and would normally work on one area of ​​a painting per session. With paint tubes and the invention of loads more pigments, artists could take all the colors they wanted with them when they painted outdoors. They could also complete each painting in a single sitting because they had all the paint they needed right there with them.