Essential Supplies of Face Painting Kits

Face painting is one of the most popular activities of children. They love to try face painting to change their look in every event or party. This is the fun activity not only to provide some fun for kids, but also helpful to traverse their creative design ideas. During festive seasons and parties people start…

Face painting is one of the most popular activities of children. They love to try face painting to change their look in every event or party. This is the fun activity not only to provide some fun for kids, but also helpful to traverse their creative design ideas. During festive seasons and parties people start finding the right material for their face transfiguration which is non toxic and safe for the skin, especially for young children.

Face Painting kits: There are a number of body and face painting kits available in the market or at online stores. It will come with a small selection of a lot of paint in different colors. A good painting kit should include the Brushes of different sizes. Here is the list of some common, but most useful supplies.

Paints: Paint is the main item of Face painting kits. Not all paintings are equal and appropriate for a face so always choose paints that are FDA approved. You can pick up a variety of colors and can also try mixing of basic colors red, green, blue, white and yellow to make new colors.

Brushes: A good Face painting kit has a number of Brushes in different sizes. To paint with different sizes 1 inch flat brush is ideal. # 2 is best for fine details and choose # 4 for larger details. Make sure to purchase good quality brushes because badly designed brushes are not last for a long time and will not stand up to repeated use or may well cause the bristle to fall out.

Sponges: Sponges are a necessary part of a good quality face paint kit. These sponges are used to apply paint on the face and for covering large areas. It is advisable to pick up sponges in various sizes, you can also cut to make it more size appropriate.

Stencils and stamps: – To make your face painting task Stencils and stamps are available these days. These are ideal, especially for cheek painting. These stamps are good to make perfect design and you will get the full attention of your kids. You can buy these stamps from an online store and can also make your own.

Face Glitter: You can make your painting design sparkle with glitter, but only get the glitter that is safe for the face. Face glitter is commonly made of polyester.

Points to consider Before buying: – Getting the right thing is not always easy, so read some helpful tips and choose right face painting supplies without any territories.

1. Always choose non toxic paints that are safe to use on kids faces. Remember that people with sensitive skin still can cause irritation, so test it before use.

2. If you use face paintings occasionally, then you can buy less expensive paint, but if you are going to start a business then buy top quality expensive paint that last for a long time.

3. Research, visit the online store and then make wiser decisions.

What Makes Face Painting an Exciting Addition to Your Kid’s Birthday Party

One of kids' absolute favorite activities at birthday parties, summer day camp and sleepovers is the chance to get their faces painted. Whether they want to morph into superheroes and jungle animals or just be adorned with pretty flowers and butterflies, kids are drawn to the sheer make-believe and fun of face painting. Kids at…

One of kids' absolute favorite activities at birthday parties, summer day camp and sleepovers is the chance to get their faces painted. Whether they want to morph into superheroes and jungle animals or just be adorned with pretty flowers and butterflies, kids are drawn to the sheer make-believe and fun of face painting. Kids at day camp love to come home with a happy lion face or goofy cartoon character grin, and this colorful, creative activity can be the perfect icing on the cake (so to speak) at your little one's birthday bash for a host of happy reasons .

Choose a Theme

Themed parties are always a big hit with little ones, and your child will love to help plan a party centered on his favorite book, character, movie or activity. Pick a zoo-themed party for a young animal lover, a princess party for your little princess or a rambunctious pirate style bash. Themes lend themselves perfectly to face art; along with some cleverly coordinated invitations, games and cake, face painting adds a fine element of fun.

It's a Great Ice Breaker

Face painting is a great way to get the party going. Whether you hire a professional or do it yourself, kids will have a blast choosing designs, watching their friends get decorated and getting right into character when their new face is on. Before you know it, your house or yard will be a beehive of activity, with princesses prancing about and caped crusaders giggling at each other.

It's a Cheap Way to Play Dress-Up

Little ones love to play dress-up, whether they're acting out their favorite Disney movie, zooming around like a superhero or swaggering about like a really wicked pirate. When you add face painting to birthday party activities, you'll find kids will get right into character and start up some lively games of make believe. Kids will be using their imagination and creativity while having a frolicking good time, and you will not have to buy expensive dress-up clothes or props.

If You Decide to DIY

Rather than pay to hire a professional party firm, you may choose to paint the little faces yourself. Just make sure that when you go the arts and crafts store, you buy non-toxic paints made especially for face painting. Unlike theatrical paintings, face paintings are easy to remove and non-greasy. Put together a book of designs for kids to choose from, and be sure to seat the child in a chair or other safe place while you are painting. Make sure they keep the eyes closed during the process and do not ever put glitter on the face, as there is no safe glitter.

If You Opt for a Professional

You may opt to hire a professional face painter, some of what even have gone to art school. Companies who provide face painting services may also offer bundles including other party fun like balloon twisting, clowns and even photo booths. Ask for recommendations from friends or check locally based websites like Angie's List for potential party artists. Before you hire, browse photos of the company's work to be sure it's the style you're looking for, and ask if they provide all supplies and whether there are extra fees. Be sure the company uses all non-toxic products, and it's a big plus if they conduct background checks on employees.

Main Kinds of the Kakejiku

Usual Kakejiku The usual kakejiku (hanging scroll) means a kakejiku, whose subject is perennial. It does not mean that we can leave the kakejiku displayed for a long time, but that we can display it freely, regardless of the season. The landscape, often called “sansui” (literally mountain and water), is one of the subjects of…

Usual Kakejiku

The usual kakejiku (hanging scroll) means a kakejiku, whose subject is perennial. It does not mean that we can leave the kakejiku displayed for a long time, but that we can display it freely, regardless of the season.

The landscape, often called “sansui” (literally mountain and water), is one of the subjects of the usual kakejiku. “Suiboku-ga” (ink painting), the art of painting in just one color using “sumi” (Japanese ink), is not only for painting lines, but also for showing gradation through contrasting ink density and lighting. The landscape painting with sumi is called a “suiboku-sansui.”

Mt. Fuji has, since ancient times, long inspired many painters, because its magnificent image has long been worshiped all over Japan. When Mt. Fuji is tinted red by the sun's rays, the image is called “Aka-Fuji” (Red Mt. Fuji). This superb view, which is rarely seen by most people, has long been considered a very lucky symbol. This is why a kakejiku of Aka-fuji is often displayed for New Year holidays as well as ordinary days, while other usual kakejiku are rarely displayed. (Most Japanese people want to have a happy New Year).

“Shikibana” means four flowers, each representing one of the four seasons. Shikibana is one of the subjects of the usual kakejiku. Although there is no special rule, a peony, which is considered the king of flowers in China, is usually positioned in the middle of the screen, with the other flowers encircling it.

The combination of bamboos and sparrows (called “take-ni-suzume”) has, since ancient times, long been considered a lucky symbol, so it is very popular in Japan.

The Japanese people admire the characteristics of bamboo: they grow straight and is flexible, yet is hard to break. They liken bamboo to the fortunes of a family, and hope that their family fortunes will not decline.
The sparrow breeds abundantly, so it has been considered a symbol of the prosperity of a family's descendants.

The tiger or dragon is often painted, because their grand strength is believed to wards off evil spirits.

Seasonal Kakejiku

The four seasons are distinct in Japan, so the Japanese people value the sense of each season. They replace their kakejiku (hanging scrolls) depending on the season. This kind of kakejiku is called “kisetsu-gake” (seasonal kakejiku).

01. Spring

Plum trees are often chosen as a subject for early spring paintings. Many Japanese people like plum trees because they are the first to blossom. Bush warblers are often depicted with plum trees in Japanese art.
Cherry blossoms are also often used as a subject for spring paintings. Cherry blossoms as a symbol of spring, are familiar to the Japanese, because they see them bloom beautifully at that time every year.

02. Summer

The peony, considered “the king of flowers” in China, is often used as a subject for early summer paintings. However, in the “kakejiku” (hanging scroll) world, displaying a peony kakejiku is considered the best hospitality you can give to a guest. Therefore, this kakejiku is often displayed even in seasons other than early summer.

Carp (called “koi”) are another common subject for summer paintings. The great popularity of “nishikigoi” (colored carps) suggests, many Japanese people love carp. According to “Gokanjo” (History of the Later Han Dynasty), a lot of fish tried to swim up a waterfall called “Ryuumon,” in the rapid stream of the Yellow River, but only the carp succeeded and that became dragons. From that story, “touryuumon” (gateway) became a symbol for success in life. “Koinobori,” meaning “carp streamer” in Japanese, are carp-shaped wind socks traditionally flown in Japan to celebrate “Tango no Sekku” (the Boys' Festival). Tango no Sekku is a traditional annual event, now designated a national holiday: Children's Day. This is why carp, shooting up a waterfall, are often used as a subject for paintings during Tango no Sekku.
The sweetfish (“ayu”) is one of the summer features in Japan, and suggests a fresh, cooling feeling to us.

The kingfisher is well loved in Japan. It never misses its prey and is considered a symbol of the fulfillment of a prayer. The kingfisher is seen throughout the year, but is often used as a subject for summer paintings. This is because the presence of a kingfisher at the waterside makes one feel refreshed in summer.

Morning glories represent summer. They were developed by Japanese gardening technology. As a result, many Japanese people love morning glories.

03. Autumn

The seven main types of Japanese autumn flowers are called “akinonanakusa”: bush clover, Japanese pampas grass, kudzu, a pink, Patrinia scabiosaefolia, thoroughwort, and bellflower. These seven autumn flowers provide visual enjoyment. Their simplicity is very much accredited: they are small and dainty, yet beautifully colored. They are, therefore, often painted as a symbol for autumn.

The persimmon is often painted as a symbol for autumn, because the persimmon tree produces a lot of fruit in autumn.

Colored leaves represent autumn. When leaves turn red in autumn, they are very beautiful and wonderful to look at. There are many places famous for their colored leaves in Japan.

Chrysanthemum flowers represent Autumn. They're also considered noble in Japan, this is because the Japanese imperial crest is in the shape of a chrysanthemum. Chrysanthemums were developed by Japanese gardening technology. As a result, many Japanese people love chrysanthemum flowers.

04. Winter

The nandina bears beautiful little red fruit in winter. The nandina is called “nanten” in Japan. The nanten is used to pray for happiness because it sounds like “nan-ga-tenjiru,” which means to reverse bad luck.
The camellia is also often painted as a symbol for winter or early spring. It is valued in the tea ceremony as well, because Sen no Rikyuu loved camellias.

Auspicious Kakejiku

The kakejiku of an auspicious painting is displayed on certain occasions, such as a new year, a ceremonial exchange of betrothal gifts (called “Yuinou”), or a celebration to commemorate a person's long life.
A pine tree is considered a symbol of longevity in Japan because its needles are always green.

The Japanese people admire the characteristics of bamboo: they grow straight and is flexible, yet is hard to break. They liken bamboo to the fortunes of a family and hope that their family fortunes will not decline.
The plum tree is the first tree to blossom, which indicates that spring has arrived. This is why the plum tree is considered a symbol of vitality in Japan.

For the reasons described above, Japanese believe that “shou-chiku-bai” (the combination of pine, bamboo and plum trees) is a lucky symbol.

The crane and the turtle were considered the vehicles of the immortals in China, so they are symbols of longevity. This thought was introduced in Japan, and now the Japanese people love the crane and the turtle as symbols of longevity, as well.

According to the Takasago Shrine in Takasago City, Hyougo Prefecture, there have been “Aioi-no-Matsu” (twin pines: a Japanese red pine and Japanese black pine that share their roots) ever since the Shinto shrine was established. A pair of trees called “Jou” (old man) and “Uba” (old woman) – a Japanese form of Darby and Joan – bearing the legend, “We kami hide in these trees to show the world the way of moral value, “stand within the shrine. This is why a Takasago painting is often displayed on an auspicious occasion. Takasago generally means of an old man and woman.

The sun has, since ancient times, been worshiped around the world, and many religions have developed out of sun worshiping traditions. For example, “Amaterasu Oomikami,” the top god in Japanese mythology, is the sun god. The sunrise on New Year's Day is often chosen as a subject for a painting of New Year.

Buddhist Kakejiku

The Buddhist kakejiku (hanging scroll), “butsuji-gake,” is used in the houyou ceremony. In Japan, as a result of the synchronization of the Shinto region with Buddhism, many strands of Buddhism unique to Japan were developed. Therefore, Japanese Buddhism includes many sects. There are many differences in the manners of the ceremony, depending on the sect and region, so the Buddhist kakejiku used in the ceremony different depending on the sect and region.

Namu-Amidabutsu

Namu-Amidabutsu is a 6 kanji (Chinese characters) phrase, meaning “I believe in Amitabha.” “Namu” means “I have faith in you.” “Amidabutsu” means “Amitabha.” The “kakejiku” (hanging scroll) with the script of Namu-Amidabutsu is used in the Buddhist memorial services of the “Joudo-shuu,” “Joudo-Shin-shuu,” and “Tendai-shuu” sects.
Namu-Shakamunibutsu

“Namu-Shakamunibutsu” is a 7 kanji phrase, meaning “I believe in Shakamuni Buddha.” The kakejiku with the script of Namu-Shakamunibutsu is used in the Buddhist memorial services of “Soutou-shuu,” “Rinzai-shuu,” and “Oubaku-shuu” sects (Zen Buddhism).

Namu-Daishi-Henjou-Kongou

Namu-Daishi-Henjou-Kongou is an 8 kanji phrase, meaning “I believe in Vairocana and respect Koubou-Daishi (a famous Japanese monk).” “Namu” means “I have faith in you.” “Daishi” means “Koubou-Daishi.” “Henjou” means “the sacred light of Buddha shines all over the world.” “Kongou” means “an indestructible substance.” This is why “Henjou-Kongou” means “Vairocana.” The kakejiku with the script of Namu-Daishi-Henjou-Kongou is used in the Buddhist memorial service of the “Shingon-shuu” sect.

Namu-Myouhou-Rengekyou

“Namu-Myouhou-Rengekyou” is a 7 kanji phrase, meaning “I devote myself to the teachings of the Lotus Sutra.” “Namu” means “I have faith in you.” “Myouhou-Rengekyou” means “Lotus Sutra.” A kakejiku with the script of Namu-Myouhou-Rengekyou is used in the Buddhist memorial service of the “Nichiren-shuu” sect.

Hannya-Shingyou

Heart of Great Perfect Wisdom Sutra (“Hannya-Shingyou”) is one of the Buddhist sutras that preaches the Kuu (Buddhism) of Mahayana Buddhism, and the Prajna school of thought. In various Japanese sects, especially “Hossou-shuu,” Tendai-shuu, Shingon-shuu, and Zen sects, use Hannya-Shingyou and interpret it individually. The kakejiku of Hannya-Shingyou is sometimes used in their Buddhist memorial services.
Juusan-butsu (13 Buddhas)

“Juu-ou-shinkou” spread in Japan during the 11th century and after. The “Juu-ou”, ten kings, are regarded as an awesome existence because they decide whether the dead should be sent to “jigoku” (Hell, one of the posthumous realms advocated by Buddhism) and preside over the “Rokudou-rinne” (transmigration in the six posthumous realms advocated by Buddhism) in light of the seriousness of the karma belonging to the dead. In Juu-ou-shinkou, the faithful beg for the mercy from the ten judges, who decide to which real the dead would go.

In the Kamakura period, the Japanese believed that each one of Juu-ou corresponded with each of “Juu-butsu” (10 Buddhas); the number grown as time went by, and in the Edo period, “Juusan-butsu-shinkou” (the 13 Buddhas belief) was born.

Buddhist memorial services were normally held seven times every seven days, because the bereaved family could pray to the Juu-ou to seek commutation for the dead person at every trial, while additional memorial services were held in line with the additional three trials that supposedly functioned to save all dead persons.

The kakejiku, on which juusan-butsu are painted, is often displayed in Buddhist memorial services.

Kannon-Bosatsu

Kannon-Bosatsu (Avalokitesvara) is a sacred image of “Bosatsu” (Bodhisattva) in Buddhism and a kind of Buddha that has, since ancient times, attained a wide spread following, particularly in Japan. There is a legend that Kannon-Bosatsu disguises herself in thirty-three forms when she saves all living things. For this reason there are various shapes of the statues of the Kannon, called “Henge (Changed) -Kannon” (other than the basic “Shou-Kannon”). Unlike the perception of Kannon as an attendant of “Amidanyorai,” Kannon-Bosatsu, which was worshiped as an independent Buddha, tends to be ashamed to for practical benefits in this world.

The kakejiku of Kannon-Bosatsu is sometimes displayed in Buddhist memorial services.

Shuuinjiku (Kakejiku of Series of Stamps Collected at Temples)

“Saigoku-Sanjuusan-kasho” is a pilgrimage of thirty-three Buddhist mysteries through the Kansai region of Japan. The pilgrimage route of the Saigoku Sanjusankasho includes, as additional holy places, three more temples associated with the founder of the pilgrimage, Saint Tokudou, and the Cloistered Emperor Kazan who revitalized it. The principal image in each temple is Kannon-Bosatsu; however, there is some variation among the images and the powers that they possess. Pilgrims record their progress with a prayer book called “Noukyou-chou,” which the staff of each temple marks with red stamps and Japanese calligraphy, indicating the temple number, the temple name and the specific name of the Kannon image. Some pilgrims receive the stamps and calligraphy on plain silk, which will be mounted on a kakejiku (hanging scroll) by a kakejiku craftsman “hyougushi.” The kakejiku, which is called “saigoku-sanjuusan-kasho-shuuinjiku,” is very popular in Japan. It is sometimes used in Buddhist memorial services.

“Shikoku-Henro,” “Shikoku-Junrei” or “Shikoku-Hachijuuhachi-kasho” is a multi-site pilgrimage of 88 temples associated with the Buddhist monk Kuukai (Koubou-Daishi), on the island of Shikoku, Japan. Large numbers of pilgrims still undertake the journey for a variety of ascetic, pious and tourism-related purposes. To complete the pilotage, it is not necessary to visit the tasks in order. The pilgrimage is traditionally completed on foot, but modern pilgrims use cars, taxis, buses, bicycles or motorcycles. The walking course is approximately 1,200 km long. Generally, it takes about 40 days by walking, and about 10 days by a sightseeing bus or car. The pilgrims are often recognizable by their white clothing, sedge hats, and walking sticks.

Many pilgrims begin and complete the journey by visiting Mt. Kouya, in Wakayama Prefecture, which was settled by Kuukai and remains the headquarters of the “Shingon-shuu” sect of Buddhism. The 21 km walking trail up to Mt. Kouya still exists, but most pilgrims use trains or cars. Pilgrims record their progress with a prayer book called Noukyouchou, which the staff of each temple marks with red stamps, Japanese calligraphy indicating the temple number, the temple name and the specific name of the Principal Image of Buddha and the Sanskrit characters to express it. Some pilgrims receive the stamps and calligraphy on plain silk which will be mounted on a kakejiku by a scroll mounter (hyougushi). The kakejiku, which is called “shikoku-hachijuuhachikasho-shuuinjiku,” is very popular in Japan. It is sometimes used in Buddhist memorial services.

The Girl's or Boy's Festival Kakejiku

Hina-matsuri

“Hina-matsuri” (The Japanese Doll Festival) is an annual event. It is a seasonal festival to pray for the healthy growth of girls. In Japan, Hina-matsuri used to be observed on March 3, of the old calendar (around present-day April). It was on the first day of March, the Snake month, according to the Japanese lunar-solar calendar. However, after the calendar reform of January 1, 1873, the festival has generally been celebrated on March 3, according to the Gregorian calendar (or new calendar). However, in some parts of Japan, mainly snowy regions such as the “Touhoku” region, Hina-matsuri is still observed on March 3rd of the old calendar. There are other regions that celebrate the festival on April 3rd, in line with the new calendar. Hina-matsuri was also named “Momo-no- (peach's) sekku” because the festival, under the old calendar, was held when peach trees blossomed.

Hina-matsuri is a seasonal festival in which dolls are displayed, and centering around two dolls representing the emperor, called “obina,” and the empress, called “mebina.” The display is decorated with peach flowers, and people enjoy eating, and drinking “shirozake” (sweet white sake).

During the Edo period, the girls' “doll play” was combined with the “ceremony of the seasonal festival.” Hina-matsuri spread across the country, and dolls began to be displayed. During this period, however, in addition to the traditional aspects of the doll display, Hina-matsuri has increasingly come to have a ritualistic aspect, in which the dolls suffer all of the present and future misfortunes, in the place of people. Also at this time, the Hina-matsuri doll set came to be considered one of the bride's household articles for high-ranking females, such as the daughters of “samurai” families. As a result, the doll trend became more elegant and luxurious.

A “tachibina” doll is a hina doll in a standing pose. The kakejiku (hanging scroll) of tachibina dolls is sometimes displayed during Hina-matsuri. Moreover, the kakejiku sometimes is displayed instead of the Hina-matsuri doll set.

Tango-no-sekku

The Japanese have a custom of holding a variety of events praying for the healthy growth of boys, on the day of Tango-no-sekku, and May 5 is a national holiday, called “Children's Day.” In a few regions, it is celebrated on June 5th, following the old lunar calendar.

In Japan, there was a ritual called “Satsuki-imi” (literally, accursed May), where all the men went out of the house, and only women stayed inside to wash the impurities away, and purify themselves before rice planting. This custom was connected to “tango,” which came from China. In the Imperial Palace, people wearing a Japanese iris in their hair got together at the “Butokuden” (a palace building) and were granted a “Kusudama” (literally, a ball of medicine made of herbs with a decoration added) by the emperor . A record from the Nara period described these events in the imperial court.

The word for the Japanese iris was pronounced the same as the word for martial spirit (both were pronounced “shoubu”), and the shape of the leaves of the Japanese iris reminds people of swords. Therefore, tango was determined as the “sekku” for boys and people prayed for the healthy growth of boys during the Kamakura period.

The typical way to celebrate tango-no-sekku is to display armor, a helmet, a sword, a doll warrior, or “gogatsu-ningyou” doll (literally, doll of May) modeled after Kintarou (a famous brave boy in a nursery tale) on a tiered stand in a room, and to fly “Koi-nobori” (carp streamers) on a pole in the front yard. Displaying armor symbolizes protecting the boys. The custom of displaying koi-nobori originates in the Chinese tradition, and it is meant to pray for the success in a boy's life.

The kakejiku which is displayed in this event can be described as follows:
The kakejiku of an iris painting.
The kakejiku of a “musha” (an armored warrior) painting.
The kakejiku of a carp shooting up a waterfall.
It is said in Chinese history that a lot of fish tried to swim up a waterfall called “Ryuumon” in the rapids of the Yellow River, but only the carp succeeded and that became dragons.
The kakejiku of a tiger or a dragon painting.
Their grand strength is believed to wards off evil spirits.

The kakejiku displayed on Hina-matsuri or Tango-no-sekku is called “sekku-gake” (the girl's or boy's festival kakejiku).

The Difference Between Contemporary And Modern Paintings

You may hear some individuals use the terms “contemporary” and “modern” interchangeably. In some cases, this use of the words is perfectly acceptable. In art, however, contemporary and modern works mean two separate things. If you've ever confused about the difference, here is a good way to look at the two painting concepts: Contemporary Paintings…

You may hear some individuals use the terms “contemporary” and “modern” interchangeably. In some cases, this use of the words is perfectly acceptable. In art, however, contemporary and modern works mean two separate things. If you've ever confused about the difference, here is a good way to look at the two painting concepts:

Contemporary Paintings

Contemporary art is used to describe works made recently. Some art historians will define contemporary paintings as works that extend back to World War II, while others believe it includes works created or accepted within the last ten years. The artists may still be producing artwork today, using the latest trends and techniques for painting. Generally, the classification is a catchall term for art that is current. In the future, people may look back on paintings produced today and give them a new name, but contemporary art serves as a placeholder for anything that has been recently produced.

Artists defined in this category are known for exploring with a variety of mediums, even on canvas. They may choose interesting color palettes, subjects, and depart from convention with their techniques. Some may even include other mediums like bits of paper, handmade dyes, or tape. Contemporary art has also seen a rise in politically charged subject matter. Artists make social statements on global issues including racism, religion, human trafficking, feminism, and environmentalism through their works.

Modern Paintings

Even though a museum of modern art includes truly modern art, it also often features contemporary displays, making the difference between the two very confusing. Modern paintings are defined in the art world as paintings produced between 1890 and 1965. Artists include Picasso, Renoir, Kandinsky and Matisse.

The era of modern art overlapped with impressionism, when artists started to throw traditions as in favor of radical experimentation in their representations. History books often define the modern art era as starting when the last impressionist artists stopped producing. The artists from this time period redefined the art world and paved the way for the contemporary artists producing works today. Many modern painters were heavily involved in abstract and expressive pieces that may or may not represent a likeness to the piece's subject matter.

Commonalities Between Modern and Contemporary Art

Art enthusiasts may look disparagingly on those who use the terms modern and contemporary art interchangeably, but you will always hear some people do so. Since the modern art era, every painting classification has been fairly broad in scope. They all use real life, social issues and emotionally charged subjects to create a statement in their art. They also highly heavy on their mind's eye to provide inspiration for completely original and inspired pieces. Finally, they all include artists interested in experimenting with new and exciting mediums and techniques.

Many art eras overlap, making them seem confusing, but movements in art history have been fluid. They bleed into one another rather than having defined beginnings and ends. In all likelihood, the label on contemporary art may change once again, giving rise to a new movement in painting.

The Majestic Wall That Says It All

The affinity of mankind toward art has always existed since time immemorial. As man evolved, his bond with art also grew and in fact, laid the seed for the first form of expressive language – Pictography – a form of writing which uses representational and pictorial drawings. But before expressing himself through written or spoken…

The affinity of mankind toward art has always existed since time immemorial. As man evolved, his bond with art also grew and in fact, laid the seed for the first form of expressive language – Pictography – a form of writing which uses representational and pictorial drawings. But before expressing himself through written or spoken language, man took to the walls to 'speak' his mind through distinct and eradicate strokes of daily life. That was born the prominent art form – Murals.

These large scale paintings applied directly to walls, ceilings, and other large flat surfaces are probably the oldest human art form. Cave paintings at Harappa, Mohenjo Daro and many other ancient human settlements stand proof of that. Since then it never saw a downside. During the Renaissance Era various art forms flourished mainly by the legendary works created by the likes of Michelangelo, Vasari and Leonardo Da Vinci. Most muralists produced art in multiple media, demonstrating a remarkable range of skills. The murals by Michelangelo adorning the interiors of the Sistine Chapel in Vatican City depicting auspicious events from the Christian Bible, never fail to strike people with awe.

The trend slowly shifted during the early 20th century as murals were often associated with political expression, one main example being the murals of Berlin Wall. Works during that period were focused on labourers, lives of the poor, and other daily life musings, a stark deviation from the highly religious murals of the Middle Ages. Many modern muralists follow the tradition of political expression and produce works on social issues. But the recent growing trend is on producing beautiful murals enhancing board rooms, corporate spaces, along with public buildings.

Murals are becoming a vital part of interior decoration. People in the fashion industry are considering painting their own portrait murals in their studios which make a bold statement about their persona and create a greater impact on their profession. There are professional muralists and illustrators one can hire to produce impactful paintings. In addition to art, murals can also be used to create a faux finish. Walls painted to resemble worn-out brick wall, or a statue with climbing plants, and a scenic sea view. These days many restaurants use indoor murals projecting a theme – an age-old historic festival, a rain forest and much more.

Murals are not just majestic artwork on walls. They are the voice of an entire community at large. They facilitate the inclusion of a leader point of view that previously could not find their audience. They are stories that are part of our rich history and means of growing our cultural consciousness, building stronger connections between our past and present.

5 Benefits Of Joining A Painting Group

1. Honing your skills Joining a painting group is a great way to hone your skills. Not only do you get time to hone and develop your skills, you also get to learn from like-minded people. You're obviously going to learn from the group's leader, but you can learn from the other members of the…

1. Honing your skills

Joining a painting group is a great way to hone your skills. Not only do you get time to hone and develop your skills, you also get to learn from like-minded people. You're obviously going to learn from the group's leader, but you can learn from the other members of the group as well. Everyone's there to learn and share experiences, hints and tips, so you're bound to learn lots of new things. Even if the group's just for beginners, you can still learn things from other people in the group, because beginners ask questions you might not have thought of and they make mistakes you can learn from.

2. Meeting likeminded people

It's always great when you meet people with similar interests. When you join a painting group, everyone in that group has one thing in common: a love of painting. Whatever your level of experience, you can enjoy getting to know people and their experience with painting. People bond over common interests. Joining a painting group can be a great way not only to meet people in general, but to make new friends.

3. Time to paint

One benefit of joining a painting group people do not appreciate is that you're given time to paint. So many people have busy lives and want to paint, but can not seem to find any time in their schedule. Join a painting group and you'll be giving yourself a set slot of time dedicated just to painting. During this time, the focus is on painting and nothing else. You can just relax, forget about everything else that's going on, and concentrate on painting.

4. Gathering opinions

Art is one of those subjects that people always have different opinions on. Join a painting group and you've got a group of people who will give you feedback, both positive and negative, on your work. People can offer you advice on your work and you can form your own opinions to offer to others about their work. Receiving a bit of criticism can do wonders for your painting because it can point out what you can do to improve your work. If you do not join a painting group, you might not get these opinions to take into account and learn from.

5. Establishing your brand

If you're thinking about becoming a professional painter, joining a painting group can be really beneficial. It can help you build up your artistic identity and establish your brand as an artist and painter. Another thing it can do is help you promote yourself and your paintings. Use people at painting groups to your advantage; get any contacts you can and discuss with others how they plan to establish their own brand. Learn from others and get your own brand ideas across to them. You can use the group not only to establish your brand, but to establish and grow potential customer base.

14 Facts You Never Knew About Paint

Paint is a wonderful substance because it allows people to create wonderful works of art. It has many uses and has enable many to explore their creativity. Here are 14 facts you never knew about paint:

Paint is a wonderful substance because it allows people to create wonderful works of art. It has many uses and has enable many to explore their creativity. Here are 14 facts you never knew about paint:

10 Fast Facts About Watercolour Paint

Watercolour paint is very popular with artists because it has many unique properties. Some watercolour techniques can be hard to master, but the result, many would agree, is worth the effort. Here are 10 fast facts about watercolour paint:

Watercolour paint is very popular with artists because it has many unique properties. Some watercolour techniques can be hard to master, but the result, many would agree, is worth the effort. Here are 10 fast facts about watercolour paint:

Become a Brilliant Creative Artist by Keeping a Sketchbook

Keeping a sketchbook is a fantastic way of keeping track of our creative ideas and drawings. Leonardo Da Vinci made a lot of sketchbooks with hundreds of pages during his life, filled with drawings. So, a sketchbook is like a diary for an artist and is a place where we can draw a lot of…

Keeping a sketchbook is a fantastic way of keeping track of our creative ideas and drawings. Leonardo Da Vinci made a lot of sketchbooks with hundreds of pages during his life, filled with drawings. So, a sketchbook is like a diary for an artist and is a place where we can draw a lot of fanciful drawings in pages and have fun. Sketchbooks can also inspire our friends and relatives to take a pencil and start drawing. Sketchbooks come in different shapes and sizes, with attractive covers.

Any person who would want to improve his drawing skills would own a sketchbook. A sketchbook not only carries our ideas, thoughts and inspirations in the form of art, but it also encourages us to draw often.

In a sketchbook we can draw anything we want like landscape and people drawing, for example – although some artists prefer to have sketchbooks based on certain subjects. Imagine that an artist has finished drawing a sketchbook having human anatomy figures. We can classify the sketchbook in the class of human anatomy. Similarly, when the artist has completed drawing a sketchbook on cartoons, we can classify the sketchbook in the class of cartoons.

We need not use the sketchbook only for drawing purpose, but we can also write our own ideas based on what we are drawing. Suppose we are sketching a typical Indian village girl character, we can form our own thoughts on the character and write so. Here are some examples:

What type of village girl am I drawing?

Where does she live? An old hut?

What does she do during her daytime?

What is the girl's name?

Where are her parents? What work do they do?

And so on …

There are many numerous websites and e-books where we can get some ideas on what to draw in our sketchbooks. We also need to collect pictures from a magazine that would inspire us to draw.

We need not worry about the techniques of drawing, at first. As sketchbooks are for personal use, we can draw and experiment whatever we like.

To conclude with, drawing and maintaining our first sketchbook will be the starting point of a journey to embark on. As the time flies by, we would gain a good deal of inspiration from sketchbooks that will increase our performance, showing us the way to become a brilliant creative artist.

Thanks ..

Best regards,

Srinidhi.R

Enroll Your Kid For Creative Art School Holiday Programs

Are you worried because your kids' school holidays are just around the corner? Are you still figuring out what to do with the kids to keep them engaged? If yes, then you need a proper planning for your kids holidays, so that their everyday chores will turn into a fun adventure. Well! Keeping the kids…

Are you worried because your kids' school holidays are just around the corner? Are you still figuring out what to do with the kids to keep them engaged? If yes, then you need a proper planning for your kids holidays, so that their everyday chores will turn into a fun adventure. Well! Keeping the kids occupied with an entertaining activity is quite a challenging task. If the weather is cold or rainy, it is always a good idea to have a backup plan so that the kids could give their best. Art activities are the best way to engage them into some kind of creative and innovative things according to their convenience.

Planning on some fun activities can help your kids to learn something new such as being independent, learning how to make decisions, and love to work. Moreover, these school holiday programs will keep them spending sedentary time watching television and playing computer games. Choose a couple of activities that are suitable as well as beneficial for your kids and you will give them a holiday experience that they will love without even leaving the city. Where they are capable to implement every idea which randomly occurs in their mind.

Art School has a variety of art activities to offer, so with a little planning, you can find something knowledgeable and different to do each day and your kids will spend the best holidays ever. Out of many activities, professional art classes are one of the best for your kids. Nowadays, there are ample opportunities to actively participate in creative work like arts. Art lessons like painting, drawing and sketching can improve the creativity and innovation among the kids.

Also, the learning process of art can be exciting and pleasurable for both student and trainer. Having this perspective can create an opportunity for every student to learn basic skills and innovative ideas about the subject. For the optimum artistic growth and development, it would be better if the classes are personalized and limited. The professional instructors really should be a skilled artist and have the ability to teach the kids.

Most of the school holiday programs provide art camps, outstanding art classes, art get-together and exclusive functions for kids. Many notable thinkers and researchers are telling that kids who take part in quality art classes and courses are usually more creative and successful in class as well as in life.

13 Fast Facts About Acrylic Paint

1. It is less than a century old. The first type of acrylic paint to become commercially available was actually polymer-based house paint, which became available in the 1940s. 2. It was only in the 1950s that acrylics were made commercially available. After that, they took off in popularity and they're retained a top choice…

1. It is less than a century old. The first type of acrylic paint to become commercially available was actually polymer-based house paint, which became available in the 1940s.

2. It was only in the 1950s that acrylics were made commercially available. After that, they took off in popularity and they're retained a top choice for many artists ever since thanks in part to their great versatility.

3. Acrylic paint does have lots of its own characteristics, though it can easily be manipulated to resemble oil paints or watercolour paints. Many artists therefore use this type of paint as a substitute for oils or watercolours.

4. Acrylic paint consists of a pigment that's suspended in an acrylic polymer emulsion binder. The pigment is the material that gives paint its color and the binder is what holds the pigment together with the emulsion.

5. Painting with acrylic gives your work a sharp, clear and bold effect. It's a good choice if you want a painting that looks really realistic.

6. Acrylic paint tends to dry quite quickly, although you can add a retarded to the paint to slow down the drying process.

7. You can easily paint layers with acrylics, as the paint's colors are permanent. You can paint one layer on top of another and the layer that's been painted over will not be visible at all.

8. Acrylic paint can be applied to a huge variety of surfaces. As well as canvas, it can be applied to surfaces such as glass, wood, ceramics, plastic, fabric, metals, stones, cars, houses and even cardboard paper.

9. There are loads of different mediums and substances, such as gels, sand and rice, that you can add to acrylics to give them all sorts of different textures. Many artists like experimenting by adding different things to the paint to see what effects they produce.

10. An acrylic painting that has completely discharged out does have the tendency to attract dust; Once you've finished working on painting, you should add a layer of varnish to it in order to prevent dust gathering on it and damaging it.

11. If you've got lots of acrylic paint on your brushes or on your hands, all you need is soap and water to get it off.

12. One of the most famous artists to have used and experienced with acrylics is Andy Warhol, known for pioneering the 'pop art' concept and movement. Many of his most recognizable and influential works, including Campbell's Soup Cans, were completed in acrylics.

13. Acrylic paint is known for producing vibrant, loud and solid colors. Paintings done in acrylic paint stand out and tend to be very eye-catching.

5 Things To Know About Underpainting

1. Colors used Many artists used to use monochromatic underpaintings. The reason for this was to give substance and volume to the different aspects of the painting, as well as to enhance the contrast between darker areas and lighter areas. However, any color and any color of combinations can be used. It's worth experimenting to…

1. Colors used

Many artists used to use monochromatic underpaintings. The reason for this was to give substance and volume to the different aspects of the painting, as well as to enhance the contrast between darker areas and lighter areas. However, any color and any color of combinations can be used. It's worth experimenting to see what different effects can be produced by using different colors and color combinations for your underpainting. Many choose to use lots of different colors as a sort of template for layers to be painted on top.

2. Purpose

Underpaintings are used to give paintings more tonality and texture. Many artists use a limited number of colors to create a first version of their painting, marking of areas that are going to be rich in color as further layers are added. Underpaintings can also be used to give your painting flashes of color. The color used in the underpainting will very slowly show through the layers on top of it. It's a good idea to experiment with contrasting colors, so the colors from the bottom layer will be shown more effectively. A really good underpainting can produce colors that visually mix with colors from the topmost layers of the painting without the colors physically blending together. Think of an underpainting as a blueprint for the final version of the painting.

3. Popularity today

A lot of artists do not actually use this technique today. The reason is because they simply do not see the point in spending time on the bottom layers when it's the topmost layers that matter the most. Underpaintings were very popular through history, though nowdays the practice of creating an underpainting has lost favor with many artists. Using this technique definitely has its advantages, as it allows you to map out your painting and highlight areas where more color is going to be applied. Using underpainting can be a great way to get you to think more about the composition of your painting.

4. Grisaille

Grisaille refers to paintings that are completed either in monochrome or nearly all in monochrome. The color used in grisaille paintings is usually gray; grisaille works can be found in many different shades of gray. Artists also use grisaille as an underpainting: the first and bottommost layer of the painting that they complete in gray. Using the grisaille underpainting technique can give paintings a sort of 3D effect. Grisaille was developed by French painters and was commonly used throughout the Renaissance. Although gray is mainly used, browns can be used as well.

5. Verdaccio

Verdaccio is the name given to a specific mixture of pigments. Those pigments are black, white and yellow. When these pigments are mixed together, they produce soft green color that has hints of yellow or gray, depending on how much of each color is used. This mixture of pigments was very commonly used by Italian artists for underpainting. It was especially popular for portraits and other works featuring people, as the green of the verdaccio would complement and balance the pinks and other light colors used to depict the subject's skin tones.

4 Benefits Of Painting Landscapes

1. Heightened appreciation Painting landscapes gives you a heightened appreciation of the natural world. It enables you to see the world more closely and to understand it finer points and intricacies. Many people do not fully appreciate the beauty of the natural world around them because they do not take the time to look at…

1. Heightened appreciation

Painting landscapes gives you a heightened appreciation of the natural world. It enables you to see the world more closely and to understand it finer points and intricacies. Many people do not fully appreciate the beauty of the natural world around them because they do not take the time to look at it more closely. When you paint a landscape, you're challenging yourself to inspect part of the natural world so you can effectively depict it in your painting. You have to see what the world around you is made up of.

2. Getting outdoors

Many landscape painters choose to practice plein air painting. This is simply the act of going outdoors and painting the world as you see it. Plein air painters explore the world around them to find a beautiful spot to paint. One of the reasons why so many artists enjoy plein air painting is because they get to be in the great outdoors surrounded by nature, as opposed to stuck in a stuffy studio. There are some artists who just explore their local region for great places to paint and there are others who will save up and travel to different countries to find the subject for their next painting.

3. Exploring colors

Nature is full of all sorts of colors – the colors that make up the natural world are seemingly endless in number. If that's not enough to contend with, there's the fact that light constantly changes through the day. You can paint the same scene loads of different times, each set at a different time of day and each using an abundance of different and unique colors. One of the best things about landscape painting is that it opens up a whole new range of colors for you to work with, many of which you may not have seen before.

4. Emotional connection

Many people believe that looking at landscape paintings is good for them. They find landscape paintings to be soothing and calming. One of the main benefits of landscape paintings is that your paintings can make others feel good. Paintings in general can have a captivating quality; landscape paintings have the ability to trigger emotional responses from people. They can help people get in touch with not only their feelings, but also their past experiences as well. Landscapes can help people remember and relive particular times of their lives that they're especially fond of.

I Saw a Star Collapse

“I saw a star collapse” is a true story and my tribute to a friend and a huge talent gone wasted. There are many such stars languishing in the corners of our life’s firmament, waiting to be discovered by some astronomer.

“I saw a star collapse” is a true story and my tribute to a friend and a huge talent gone wasted. There are many such stars languishing in the corners of our life’s firmament, waiting to be discovered by some astronomer.

Kakejiku (Japanese Hanging Scroll)

Since ancient times, Japan has been considered one of the most mysterious countries in the world. The kakejiku is an ultimate tool for learning about Japan. The Japanese people have long set a high value on aesthetic methods since ancient times. As a result, the peculiar culture which is not seen in other countries blossomed…

Since ancient times, Japan has been considered one of the most mysterious countries in the world. The kakejiku is an ultimate tool for learning about Japan.

The Japanese people have long set a high value on aesthetic methods since ancient times. As a result, the peculiar culture which is not seen in other countries blossomed and many aspects of the modern Japanese culture come from it. Parts of Japanese culture has been introduced to people in other countries recently, so the number of people from other countries who are interested in Japanese culture has been increasing.

However the Japanese aesthetic styles, which are the bases of Japanese culture, have been nurtured through a long history. Beside, they are intertwining various elements intricately such as climate, geographical features, religion, customs. Therefore, they are very difficult to understand not only for people from other countries, but even for the Japanese people. I think the best tool which conveys these difficult senses understandably is a kakejiku.

The kakejiku (a hanging scroll; a work of calligraphy or a painting which is mounted and hung in an alcove or on a wall) is a traditional Japanese art. It's no exaggeration to say that paintings are what express aesthetic sensations at all times and places. The kakejiku is an art which expresses the Japanese aesthetic styles. The kakejiku has long been used in traditional Japanese events, daily life and so on since ancient times. As a result, there are various customs of kakejiku in Japan; kakejiku and the life of the Japanese are closely related. We can see Japanese values ​​through kakejiku.

What Is the Kakejiku?

The “kakejiku” is a Japanese hanging scroll; it is a work of painting or calligraphy, which is usually mounted with silk fabric edges on flexible backings. The kakejiku can be roled for storage.

The kakejiku is intended to be hung against a wall as part of the interior decoration of a room. It is traditionally displayed in the “tokonoma” alcove of a room, which is especially designed to exhibit prized objects. It can also be displayed in the most important room of the house, where a tea ceremony, or other traditional activities are performed. The kakejiku is also often hung in martial arts rooms called “doujou” (training rooms). Near the kakejiku, there are often other objects (“okimono”), such as swords (“katana”), dolls, “bonsai,” or flower arrangements (“ikebana”).

An essential aspect of the kakejiku is that it is not intended to be hung permanently; making it versatile in its placement. This means that it can be changed at frequent intervals. One of the pleasures of the kakejiku lies in selecting a suitable one, depending on occasions, guests, and seasons.

History of the Kakejiku

The kakejiku was introduced to Japan during the Heian period (794-1185), primarily for displaying Buddhist images for religious worship, or as a way to display calligraphy or poetry.

The original architecture of Japanese housing had developed considering since the Muromachi period (1336-1573). In this newly developed architectural style, the Japanese-style room (called “washitsu”) became a room on which floor tatami mats are laid, and it contains one special space that is called the tokonoma alcove. The most important feature of the tokonoma is the display of kakejiku. The tokonoma was regarded as a space which connects art and daily life; so landscapes, paintings of flowers and birds, portraits, and poetry became favorite themes.

During the Momoyama period (1573-1600) two great sovereigns were represented: Nobunaga Oda, and Hideyoshi Toyotomi. They liked “chanoyu” (tea ceremonies) very much. Tea ceremonies were usually performed in the room with the tokonoma alcove. The tokonoma architectural style was developed and established in this period. Accompanied with the development of tokonoma style, the techniques of painting and mounting were also developed, because the kakejiku was always displayed in the tokonoma. Moreover, Sen no Rikyuu mentioned the importance of the kakejiku, so it became extremely popular among people who were fascinated with tea ceremonies.

There were only a few big wars during the Edo period (1603-1868) in Japan. The peacefulness of the Edo period allowed Japanese culture to reach full maturity. Many famous painters flourished and competed with each other. The kakejiku also became popular among the public.

After the Meiji period (1868-), many more painters competed with each other with their techniques, because people became absolutely free to choose their own occupations during this period. Before World War 2, and for a while after that war, most Japanese-style paintings were designed to be decorated on kakejiku.

Why Is the Kakejiku Replaced?

Why is the kakejiku replaced? The spirit of the tea ceremony, a traditional Japanese art, affects this Japanese custom deeply. There is a heart of hospitality called “omotenashi” in a tea ceremony. When Japanese people think about the mood of a tea ceremony, they take it a lot into consideration. More specifically, they think about the various techniques they could use to make the mood the best. The kakejiku is displayed to express respect for guests indirectly, and is considered the most important tool in a tea ceremony. Therefore, the kakejiku is replaced depending on the occasions or seasons. The omotenashi heart makes them change the kakejiku.

The kakejiku developed during the Muromachi era (1336-1573) along with the development of tea ceremonies. As a result, people began to think that it was important to express the formality of the occasions to guests by displaying various kinds of kakejiku. Many customs of the kakejiku were derived from this type of thought in Japan.

Of course, many owners have their kakejiku for the purpose of enjoying themselves, and it is also part of fun to show their lovable kakejiku to their guests.

Function of the Kakejiku

There is a tokonoma alcove in a washitsu (traditional Japanese-style room), where a kakejiku is displayed. However there is very little furniture inside the room other than the kakejiku. The Japanese people do not have a custom of hanging many paintings on the walls inside the room; they usually display a kakejiku only in the tokonoma, and replace it by another depending on the occasions, guests, and seasons.

It is said that this style of display contrasts with the Western style. Many paintings are often displayed on the walls of Western buildings, such as old European buildings or palaces. For example, if there are 100 paintings, it would be the Western style to display all 100 paintings on the walls. However, the Japanese people put all 100 paintings in a closet, and choose only one to display for a short term in its fixed place (tokonoma). Therefore, there is a clear difference in functions demanded from a painting between the West and Japan. In the West, painting needs a frame for durability because it is displayed for a long time. In Japan, however, a painting does not need so much protection because it is displayed only for a short time. Handiness and convenience are very important elements for a painting, because the Japanese people will change it frequently. It is also necessary not to take up the storage space. That is to say, the style, which satisfies the above conditions, is a kakejiku-style.

The kakejiku is rolled up when putting it away, and is opened while displaying it. As a result, flexibility and strength are needed to end the process of displaying and putting it away. Therefore, the “honshi” (main work) is reinforced by backing it with another piece of paper, and cloths are attached around the honshi, and they are combined. This is a rough mounting process for the kakejiku. If the kakejiku is rolled up, this style prevents the honshi from creasing, tearing, and getting dirty. Even if the honshi is damaged or becomes dirty, the lifetime of the honshi and its aesthetic value can be kept for several hundred years by remounting the kakejiku.

The kakejiku is an ideal style; it enables the Japanese people to enjoy their paintings at their best.