How to Solve 7 Major Problems An Artist Faces

Starting out not long ago as a visual artist, I found it to be creatively very fulfilling. There were many artistic discoveries that helped me find my true self and when it came to my network, some people were supportive and some were not comfortable acknowledging it. A friend once told me, that because art…

Starting out not long ago as a visual artist, I found it to be creatively very fulfilling. There were many artistic discoveries that helped me find my true self and when it came to my network, some people were supportive and some were not comfortable acknowledging it. A friend once told me, that because art evokes feelings and deep imagination, it can affect those who are not ready to be expressive. So be ready to take criticism and rejection as part of the process.

You may feel all alone in your career as an artist with so many competitions in the market and a product that is undervalued. But here are some of the challenges we face on a regularly basis and even for the professional who may be a lot more established, these are common problems.

1. My Art Is Not Good Enough

Feel like you are not “creative or good enough?” think deeply on what your definition of creative is for you. Do you think that your art is not creative or great enough since it does not look as special as some other piece of art you must have compared it with? Or is it because you have not been doing art for a long time? Whatever it might be – you should not feel that your art is not creative or good enough, as such art will continuously be evolving and getting better as time evolves. The actual remedy to this issue is to simply place your art out there in the marketplace and market it, even though you do not feel it's good or creative enough to sell.

This provides a good learning experience and it will help you accept the reality that art is not designed to be perfect. Although you may view your primary art piece and feel it suck, well that happens to a majority, so accept it and embrace it. If you really think that your art requires some work, then you should keep practicing and get yourself into more courses that can help you develop further.

2. Nobody Is Purchasing My Art Work

When you feel like nobody is purchasing your artwork, ask yourself if you have a blueprint to attain the required sales? What channels do you sell from, and what are you doing to ensure those places are generating any income? Are you regularly updating your online store? Are you selling your art works to the right target audience? Are you promoting through social media and are you doing it efficiently? Let's consider each of these following questions further and talk about them individually – for you to reach an ideal solution for this issue you must be willing to find where your problems are and resolve them as quickly as possible.

I personally do not sell my art freely to anyone because there must be value and respect for my creations so finding myself the right buyer is something that is a challenge constantly. You do not want to sell your art to someone for loose change and find that your masterpiece has been left in the basement and is collecting dust. If you are marketing your collections at a more affordable price range then invest in selling reproductions / fine art prints instead.

3. I do not Have a Plan for My Sales

For you attain more sales, then you are required to have a plan on how you will attain them. Having plans / blueprints keeps you focused on your mission and helps you achieve your objectives quicker as you have better view of where it will go covering on such plan. If you do not have a plan; then this could be the purpose you are not selling enough of your artwork.

Another good option would be to view other artists and how they are marketing their artwork. It does not always require for you to sell in galleries or at the markets. These days you can upload your art on many platforms that can help you sell.

4. Not Knowing How to Leverage

If you are marketing your artwork independently, you must ensure that you have several means of doing it. This guarantees that you have more opportunities of getting money as well as having your projects better seen. In case you only market at once spot, whether offline or online, you should work on some other revenue channel / stream. This could range from marketing your art in diverse locations online or offline, receiving tasks, and licensing your art. It's exactly like that popular phrase – do not place all your eggs in one basket!

5. Wrong Target Audiences

You require having a concrete idea of ​​the kind of folks that would most likely purchase your work. We refer to this as your “Target Audience or Market” and this is utilized to classify who your actual buyers are. If you have not thought of who your target audience / market is, start asking first your friends and family for feedback. Once you can identify the type of people who prefer your style of painting, drawing or sculpture, they then become your target audience. You will need to market your stuff to the same age group, gender, demographics and lifestyle preference as your initial research. Simply put, if your style of painting is pop art then it will most likely suit the young millennia than it would for baby boomers. So, you should start creating and marketing specifically for this group.

6. Not Enough Online / Social Media Presence

Whether you market online or offline, you might be missing a lot of prospects if you are not promoting your art on diverse social media. Let's assume that you are, although you are not receiving enough engagement or opportunities from it. If so, you should ask yourself if you are doing it correctly, meaning that, do you post at the right moment? And are you posting the right content or projects? Are you aware of how regular you should post on a social media platform? It may look like so much – however once you acquire all these data on social media, it will become easier for you and be the best investment of your time since it will pull in awesome results.

7. Nobody is Supporting My Art Career

Many artists and creative have family members, loved ones or friends who do not support their art career. Such reason could be because they do not see it as a promising career, and they do not realize how you would break or support yourself from such venture, and to be direct – they just do not get the entire picture / scene. We can even assume that they are worried about you, since it's an area that's totally unfamiliar to them. The ultimate way to have them on your side – would be to tell them your plan. Discuss with them how you intend to make cash and let them know what you will do to make a life out of it. If you do have a plan, then it would be great to reveal it to them and point out to them other existing artists that are making a living from their art. Thru this, they will have better view and understand this is a viable career prospect.

Your art business can be rewarding in many ways however it does come with many risks and sacrifices. If you are willing to stick by your plans and invest your time and energy into developing and problem solving, it can be quite a rewarding career. Remember to ask for help from those who are willing to offer you guidance and knowledge.

Acrylic Paints – Layering and Blending Techniques

Acrylic paints are very versatile. They can be used to create effects of water colors, oil, and represent their own qualities. All three of these techniques may be combined into one painting if you choose to do so. Enjoy these tints as they represent a world of realism, abstract, fantasy, and much more on any…

Acrylic paints are very versatile. They can be used to create effects of water colors, oil, and represent their own qualities. All three of these techniques may be combined into one painting if you choose to do so. Enjoy these tints as they represent a world of realism, abstract, fantasy, and much more on any chosen surface.

Prime and Layer Work Surface:

Prepare surface (paper, canvas, glass, wood, cloth, plastic, clay, etc.) with the appropriate primer to receive acrylic paints. Layer colors of acrylic paint as outlined in your sketch. Continue layering paint until satisfying texture and depth.

Layering can be done horizontally, vertically, or overall. Utilize different tools of application. Brushes are commonly used. Experiment with other objects such as wooden or plastic spoons, knives and spatulas, and sponges and cloth to create flat, fluffy, or ridged surfaces.

Layering and Sketching:

Layering paints on the work surface is very important as it will add more dimensional and richer texture to your painting. Make any necessary adjustments or surface preparation of the working surface. Then choose to pencil, pen, or paint a sketch.

My personal preference for sketching is a combination of both pencil and paint. Use a very light pencil because depending on the chosen pigment it may require many layers of application to hide pencil marks.

Benefits of a painted background:

  1. It is a guideline for foundation colors, depth, texture, and richness of the finished work.
  2. Prevents white paper or canvas peek-a-boos leaking through the work.
  3. Painting the background sets the bonding agents of the foundation and the paints to adhere tightly together and prevent tint fade outs or chipping paint.
  4. It is very difficult to paint the background after the details have been completed. There will always be an outline of bare paper or canvas showing around the details. The details will appear to recede into the background rather than being displayed in their natural order. Always paint starting with the background and work forward.
  5. It presents a refined and finished work of art.

Layering and Blending:

  • Layering is the application of paint on paint to help acquire texture, depth and rich deep colors.
  • Blending is combining colors by overlapping.

Two techniques for blending is misting the surface or wet on wet application.

Blending and layering are two of many techniques for which these paints may be utilized. Many other approaches may be taken with these pigments to create masterpieces.

Why Do We Color?

Coloring books – color yourself calm There's something quite charming and nostalgic about painting. It is just a really nice way to be creative. You do not have to sit down with a blank sheet of paper, the outlines are already there for you to fill them in, and that is something you can do…

Coloring books – color yourself calm

There's something quite charming and nostalgic about painting. It is just a really nice way to be creative. You do not have to sit down with a blank sheet of paper, the outlines are already there for you to fill them in, and that is something you can do quietly, alone or with your friends and family for a couple of hours.

Everyone is looking for an outlet or a distraction from everyday routine. Coloring books do just that – taking you back to your childhood, a simpler and happier time. Once you start, your mind becomes so engaged, you forget about everything around you. On top of that, you end up with something beautiful even without any prior art experience. When you finish a piece, you feel a sense of accomplishment and pride.

Personal Therapy Session

After a long and stressful day, all we need is to relax, switch of thoughts and focus on the moment. The latest weapon against stress is painting! It does not require much investment and it's portable. You will feel better immediately. This could help us combat stress and boost mental clarity. It is a smart way to promote creative thinking and personality development. Also, this could be a perfect pre-bedtime ritual.

Spend quality time with your family

Can you remember the last time you did something fun and creative with your children? The main difference between an adult and a children's coloring books would be the images. Adult coloring books are more sophisticated and have a lot more details. What is important is the fact that the they are beneficial for both, parents and children. Children can improve hand to eye coordination, motor and cognitive skills and handwriting. Painting is calming and centered activity which stimulates creative thinking. Children can learn patience and boundaries, gain confidence and boost imagination. On the other hand, painting allow parents to switch off thoughts and focus on the moment. Drawing in offers a quick creative and calming outlet. Above all, research shows that this can reduce stress and anxiety. So, it is the perfect pastime for both you and your kid.

Mindfulness

Mindfulness can transform your life, and it is possible to reach it and focus on the moment. Coloring books for adults could be very helpful when practicing mindfulness. You are not living in the past nor in the future. Life is available only here and now. Mindfulness is some sort of energy that helps us the happiness, which is already present in our life. You do not have to wait ten years to experience this happiness.

Many people struggle every day with keeping focus on simple tasks. Coloring gives us the opportunity to hone in on a simple activity that does not require much planning. While doing that, our minds are stimulated, and we do not get bored as quickly, due to the nature of the task. So, this requires the brain to work on one thing at a time, thus helping the mind to focus. Focus your mind while enjoying the simple pleasures. Mindfulness is when you are truly there, mind and body together. That is why mindfulness is a source of happiness and joy.

Take your mind through the world of coloring books for adults, and you will reach the mindfulness, and feel happiness and joy every day!

Painting Landscapes With Acrylic Paints – 3 Techniques

Painting landscapes can be complimented with acrylic paints. Acrylic paints offer application choices for water painting, as is, and oil painting. These three choices offer the artist a variety of visual and texture techniques to duplicate a landscape onto canvas. The acrylic paint itself will create interesting textures from watery see-through mists to thick oil…

Painting landscapes can be complimented with acrylic paints. Acrylic paints offer application choices for water painting, as is, and oil painting. These three choices offer the artist a variety of visual and texture techniques to duplicate a landscape onto canvas. The acrylic paint itself will create interesting textures from watery see-through mists to thick oil textures.

Landscape locations

  1. A popular method of capturing the outdoors is to take photos during different times of the day or use photos from your travel adventures. This is more time-saving than sitting outdoors for long periods of time or venturing out on different days having to capture the right light effect.
  2. Set up your easel at the beach, your favorite lake site, a mountain site, or a neighborhood park.
  3. Sit by a home window which presents beautiful scenery from the lawn or flower beds.
  4. Browse a variety of magazines and other print material or videos, film, DVDs, and online travel or landscaping viewing for landscape pictures and ideas.
  5. Meditate; then draw and paint a landscape picture from your memory bank.

Painting Tools

Acrylic painting techniques for painting landscapes is an adventure onto itself. The painting tools and your brush stroke style will create many variables. Use different types of brushes, palette knives, towels, fingers, paper towels, sponges, and other notions which capture your imagination. If using a brush does not capture the likeness of a particular plant, rock, or flower then experiment with other suggested tools. These paintings are very versatile allowing you to match your artistic style of traditional through experimental.

Painting Techniques

Artists need to practice different types of techniques with a variety of tools to understand how to create desired real life effects on a flat surface.

Do you enjoy water coloring?

Thin your tint to a watery consistency and apply to canvas. It is important to use textured paper designed for water coloring. Have a sheet of a paper towel handy to wipe and stop bleeds as needed.

Do you enjoy using the paint directly from its container?

Acrylic paints can be directly applied to the selected surface or canvas. The versatility of this paint will allow you to use all three methods to create the desired illusions. Acrylic opens a world of choices for texture. Have fun with it.

Do you like the texture and thickness of oil painting?

The higher content of tint; the less liquid filler is used. This is the higher quality of paint and it will cost you a few more dollars per container. This paint will be thicker and richer because of the increase of color and it will give the appearance of oil paint. Oil paint has toxic fumes. Acrylic paints are nontoxic.

Pencil Sketching

Sketching ahead will allow you to make corrections and see the final product in the penciled form. If you are using a graphite pencil, use light strokes. The acrylic paint may not cover your pencil marks.

Some artists like to sketch with colored pencils to discourage unwanted visible markings under a thin layer of paint. Sketching before or after applying a layer of background paint will be a personal choice.

Paint Sketching

Painting without sketching is freedom to be challenged by errors and happy accidents. You will be placed into the unknown. Your colored creation will take many twists and turns as your landscape painting is born on canvas.

Use a soft broad brush to make a series of horizontal, vertical, or interweave strokes. Use a smaller brush or tool substituted tinted with paint to sketch trees, waterfall, shrubbery, road, fencing, and other landscape features as guidelines. Upon completion of sketching, return to fill in details to finalize the landscape.

These paints are easy to apply, no allergy irritants, no toxic fumes, and very affordable. A person can paint on any type of surface.

Why Art Collectors Are in Love With Floral Paintings These Days

Reproductions of floral paintings are selling like hot cakes in online stores dedicated to modern art for sale, sculpture home décor and more With floral art and floral paintings becoming coveted products for art collectors globally, smart replications and reproductions of some of the most valued floral art forms are making their presence felt in…

Reproductions of floral paintings are selling like hot cakes in online stores dedicated to modern art for sale, sculpture home décor and more

With floral art and floral paintings becoming coveted products for art collectors globally, smart replications and reproductions of some of the most valued floral art forms are making their presence felt in art stores online. Art lovers have a fancy for floral art for two significant reasons, their beauty and meaning. Different flowers tend to have different kinds of symbolic messages attached to them; therefore some flowers tend to be more popular and wanted than others. Across history, artists had been inspired by the prettiest flowers and found them to be the perfect objects for their paintings.

Did you know that some of the earliest known paintings depicted flowers and plants? Here, we have assembled some floral paintings, sculpture home décor that are being purchased by art enthusiasts globally.

'Roses and Sunflowers' (1886):

A masterpiece by Vincent van Gogh, this 1886 creation is currently hosted at 'Kunsthalle Mannheim', a much famed museum showcasing modern and contemporary paintings. Like most paintings and art forms by Vincent van Gogh, this one was also created with oil upon canvas. An art store online selling floral painting reproductions would certainly have this on its cards.

'Bouquet' (1599)

If you have already invested in the best modern art for sale online and would like to opt for something flowery for a change, then this Jan Brueghel the Elder painting is what you should go for without any further ado. Painted in 1599, the epic creation is one of the oldest floral paintings known to mankind. It portraits many beautiful flowers and serves to be a wonderful example of conventional floral art

'Vase of Flowers' (1480)

This coveted painting, like many others belonging to the same era, depicts religious symbolism to the hilt. These symbolic messages go back in times and may not have their desired relevance in the contemporary world; suddenheless, the painting in which they are presented is notching favors everywhere.

Still-Life of Flowers' (1614)

This painting is unique in itself and shows the talent of Ambrosius Bosschaert who created it in 1614. Depicting the still life lead by flowers in the best possible way, the detailing, realism and shading of the painting is beyond compare.

These and many other floral paintings are making it to the art collections of amateur and professional art enthusiasts in a big way. You may like to check out a few of such paintings for your personal or office space as well.

Focus on the Process, Not the Result

When most people think of art, they think of something static and unchanging. Films play moving images with sound, and music fills the air with melody, but traditional forms of art are still and lifeless: a statue, an oil painting, a straw basket. If properly preserved, a piece of art can remain the same for…

When most people think of art, they think of something static and unchanging. Films play moving images with sound, and music fills the air with melody, but traditional forms of art are still and lifeless: a statue, an oil painting, a straw basket. If properly preserved, a piece of art can remain the same for decades or even centuries. You can view a painting at the art museum as a child, then go back and view the same painting as an adult – and it's still exactly the same. For these reasons and more, people tend to view art as something already stopped, something at a standstill. The process is unimportant; it is simply a means to an end.

But this is not true.

And in today's world, even artists have started to believe this myth. They pay little attention to the creative process, instead rushing through as quickly as possible so they can sell the piece and move on to the next one. The process is a chore, while the finished piece is the reward. With deadlines looming ahead, there's no room for spontaneity, creativity, or last-minute changes. The artist is completely focused on the vision in her head, and will not allow anything to get in her way – not even a burst of imagination.

As artists, it's time to break out of that old mindset and allow our art to change and grow to its full potential. The process matters most of all, for that is where art comes alive.

We sketch out our rapidly changing vision, start applying paint to the canvas, make changes and alterations as the brush guides us, and sometimes end up with a completely different piece together. Art is so fluid and spontaneous that sometimes even we can not believe what we've created!

When you find yourself making “finishing touches” unequivocally, without ever actually finishing, it's usually due to some dissatisfaction with the finished work. Stop torturing yourself; if you focus on the act of creating rather than the act of finishing, more often than not you'll know exactly when you're done, and it will usually surprise you because you were not paying attention to the finish line.

It's important to set goals and work toward deadlines, but if you see the creative process as surely a means to an end, you'll sap all the joy out of your work. Do not be afraid to play around and experiment. Work intuitively and let the canvas reflect your inner vision. The best contemporary painters are constantly evolving and experimenting, trying to push their work to the next level. If you want to create, be a creator – not someone who throws something together in a race to the finish.

Madhubani: The Art Capital

Madhubani paintings are originated from the Mithila region of Nepal and India. Mostly practiced by women of the villages to decorate their huts made up of mud during the festive occasions. The art has been changing from the old times and nowdays the painting has been done on canvas, cloth, and paper. As the time…

Madhubani paintings are originated from the Mithila region of Nepal and India. Mostly practiced by women of the villages to decorate their huts made up of mud during the festive occasions. The art has been changing from the old times and nowdays the painting has been done on canvas, cloth, and paper. As the time passes by, the painting began turning into a piece of merriment and extraordinary occasions. Gradually the painting of India crossed the conventional limits and beaching achievements of workmanship, both at the national and the global level.

The ladies from this district have been rehearsing society expressions since the 1800's. The moms have been passing their insight and lessons to their little ones & showing them the aesthetic examples and colors minimal known to the outside world.

The Making

Madhubani paintings are created from natural colors such as ocher, charcoal soot, flowers, turmeric, sandalwood, apple and banyan tree leaves and paste of powdered rice. Painting is finished with the help of twigs, fingers, and brushes.

Themes of the Painting

The listed are designed in geometric forms. The mostly drawn themes belong to nature such as sun, moon, holy plants tulsi, flowering plants, birds and animals for filling the gaps in between the images. Along with Hindu deities such as Shiva, Rama, Krishna, Durga, Lakshmi and Saraswati during some important and auspicious events like interviews, childbirth and festivals such as Holi, Diwali, Durga Pooja, Surya Pooja etc.

3 different styles of Madhubani painting

The art form of Madhubani is divided into three famous styles according to their caste system

1. Brahman: Being highest in the caste the Brahmins ladies were allowed to designs and color their painting using the bright hues. Making the religious portrait of god and goddesses. Due to their easy access to all holy text, it has gotten much easier for them to make religious and mythological motifs.

2. Kayastha: The Kayasthas are on the second in the caste system after Brahmans. As we all know Kayastha are believed to be great warriors and braves. They got the style of painting and showcasing fertility. Animals and flowering plants including holy animals, birds, and plants such as lotus, parrot, peacock, fish and tortoise.

3. Dusadh: The third and lower caste in the hierarchy of caste system. The Dusadh people were not allowed to use any sort of religious motifs in their paintings. Their style of painting is otherwise called Tattoo or Godhana painting. Regular themes of vegetation can be found in their specialty. With time as the social acknowledgment broadened, they have now begun painting themes of divine god and goddesses. And nowadays their utilization of dynamic hues is very like the Brahmin style of painting.

Advancement

All around known as the ladies' craft, today the innovative world sees a sexual orientation, move where men are seen adding their imaginative touch to this conventional artistic expression. In current circumstances, form masters are back-pedaling to the rich material legacy of this workmanship and resuscitating this craftsmanship by outlining Madhubani sarees, dupattas, and the Indo-western dresses.

At various fashion weeks, fashioners have exhibited shading filled gathering of Madhubani outlines. From sarees, salwar kameez, long skirts, and palazzo jeans are wonderfully planned in Madhubani workmanship.

Expectedly, this craftsmanship was done to beautify and add hues to homes. In any case, with evolving times, it is currently even done on high-quality paper-mâché items and divider works of art. Paper stands, magazine case, games like Ludo, and adornments boxes made of papier-mâché, book marks, stamps and wall hanging are painted with Madhubani outlines.

Foreign Scholars investment in promoting Madhubani Painting

The foreign schools have played a significant role in advancing the artistic painting globally likewise was gigantic. The very first person to visit Mithila and promote the art was a French journalist and author Yves Vequad, in the mid-1970s. His exploration created a book and a film, The Ladies Painters of Mithila. He was soon trailed by the German anthropologist and folklorist Erika Moser. Moser and Raymond Lee Owens, an American who set up the Master Craftsmen Association of Mithila in 1977. The association is still running and gives the craftsmen of the Mithila a standard salary through presentations, and deals with gatherers and craftsmanship exhibitions. In Japan, there is a gallery called 'Mithila Historical center which has more than 850 Madhubani work of Art is showcased.

Fascinating Actualities

The legacy of Madhubani workmanship is no less than 2,500 years; however, it is said the previous decade that this craftsmanship has increased much noticeable quality and is being commended in the design world. The specialty of Madhubani paintings and creativity of the artist is renamed in India as well as appreciated by the people all over the world.

7 Mixed Media Background Ideas for Your Art

Are you looking for a way to create an interesting background for your mixed media art? First you need to decide on your overall theme. Do you want a natural, rustic look or does your art need a bright, colorful background? Here are some ideas. Corrugated cardboard. You can add a wonderful, natural look to…

Are you looking for a way to create an interesting background for your mixed media art? First you need to decide on your overall theme. Do you want a natural, rustic look or does your art need a bright, colorful background? Here are some ideas.

Corrugated cardboard. You can add a wonderful, natural look to your art by using corrugated cardboard. Remove some of the paper from the cardboard so that the corrugated lines can be seen. This is a good way to recycle some of that cardboard you've been saving.

Old textbook or songbook pages. You can find old books at library sales, garage sales and in second hand stores very inexpensively. The pages can be torn, sanded, tea stained, painted with watercolors and used to create wonderful backgrounds.

Textured fabric. I like to use fabrics such as burlap, denim or muslin to add texture to my mixed media backgrounds.

Modeling paste. You can create lots of cool, dimensional textures for your art by using modeling paste and stencils or other items such as plastic mesh. If you do not want to buy the paste, you can make your own. There are a variety of modeling paste recipes online.

Paper napkins. Paper napkins are available in a wide array of patterns, designs and colors and offer an inexpensive way to decorate almost any surface. You can decoupage the whole napkin onto your background or cut out certain parts to enhance or act as a focal point in your art.

Crackle technique. This is a good technique to use when you want to add an aged, weathered effect to your art. The basic idea is to apply paint to your surface and after it's dry, put on a coat of white glue or crackling medium and cover it with a paint that contrasts the color of the first layer.

Aluminum foil. Add texture to foil by wrinkling it and then smoothing it out with your hand. It can be colored with alcohol ink, nail polish or indelible marks.

Shelf liner. I like to buy shelf liner from the dollar store to use as backgrounds in my art. Often I'll spray paint it before I use it. Note: I usually do my spray painting on newspaper which leaves behind a beautiful design that can be used as a background in other projects.

There is no shortage of materials you can use to create your mixed media backgrounds. Decide what type of art you will be creating and choose colors and textures that will complete your finished piece.

7 Ideas for Mixed Media Art

If you are having trouble getting started with your mixed media art or need some ideas of what to do next or simply want to try a new technique or material, here is an idea-generating list to read through. You can use any combination of these ideas or put your own twist on them. 1.…

If you are having trouble getting started with your mixed media art or need some ideas of what to do next or simply want to try a new technique or material, here is an idea-generating list to read through. You can use any combination of these ideas or put your own twist on them.

1. Watercolor. To create an interesting watercolor background, you can layer transparent colors over one another, allowing the bottom colors to show through. A transparent watercolor effect can be achieved by mixing the color with water before applying it to your surface.

2. Fabric cut-outs. Select some fabric that has simple shapes or motifs. “Paint” around the edges with a mixture of white glue and water to prevent fraying. After the glue has dried, cut out your shape using a pair of scissors. You can use this to decorating greeting cards, wall art, art journal pages etc.

3. Aluminum foil background, crinkly effect. For an interesting background, you can crinkle a piece of foil and then smooth it out by hand, and color it with permanent marks, shoe polish or ink.

4. Aluminum foil, dimensional design. Another way foil can be used in your art is by drawing a simple design on cardboard and going over the drawing with a line of hot glue or tacky glue. After it's dry, cover the cardboard with foil and press gently around the glue lines (using a soft rag or cotton swab) to reveal the design. Go over it with paint or shoe polish and wipe off the excess, which leaves paint in the grooves and gives emphasis to your design.

5. Quilling shapes and designs. You can create beautiful dimensional art using strips of papers that are rolled, shaped, and glued together. You can buy precut strips of paper or cut your own using a paper shredder or a craft knife.

6. Nature finds. Take a walk outside and pick up twigs, weeds, bark, small stones to use in your art. Make sure to check for bugs or spiders before bringing into your house.

7. Paper doilies. Paper doilies are an inexpensive way to add texture and interest to your background. They can be painted, folded, and used to create art.

There are no limits to the things you can do with mixed media art, but sometimes you may get stuck and can not think of anything to create. Use these ideas to help get your juices juices flowing again.

6 Tips for Painting on Canvas

While a blank canvas can be used for painting, you have to do it with a lot of care. Being full of ideas is not enough. If you want to be on the right track, we suggest that you use the following tips for painting on canvas. Read on to know more. 1. Get Your…

While a blank canvas can be used for painting, you have to do it with a lot of care. Being full of ideas is not enough. If you want to be on the right track, we suggest that you use the following tips for painting on canvas. Read on to know more.

1. Get Your Canvas Ready

First of all, you should go for a pre-stretched canvas or just stretch the one you already have. Your next step is to prime it. Oftentimes, you can use gesso for this purpose. This is available in a lot of types and can be used with oil paint, tempera, or acrylic, just to name a few.

Gesso protects the canvas fibers and improves the painting surface. As a result, you will have to use less amount of paint for the work you want to do. Using the oil sparingly will save you a good deal of money.

2. Set The Mood

Aside from gesso, another great option is to apply a certain tone to the canvas for setting a mood. For example, a sharp white canvas may not be the right choice for a stormy painting. On the other hand, a simple coat of bluish-gray may offer a moody surface for your desired look, which is what you want.

3. Canvas And Supplies

You should decide on the workplace first. The canvas can be upright or it can be placed on a flat surface near your palette. All you have to do is make your work a lot easier by making the right choice. You may want to get you painting supplies ready. The things you will need include water, palette knives, and paint brushes, just to name a few.

4. Choose The Right Brushes

Some brushes work better for canvas painting. For example, you can not use water color brushes on hard canvas surfaces. These brushes are too soft and can not be used on rocks and other hard surfaces. Generally, oil paint brushes or acrylic brushes are a better choice. They come with stiffer bristles and longer handles.

5. Try AN Underpainting

Typically, canvas is used for non-transparent paints. However, they also offer a great opportunity for you to try an underpainting. As a matter of fact, this allows you to create an outline that can add an impressive dept to the art piece. Therefore, it is highly recommended that you try an underpainting as well.

6. Adjust Colors

Usually, oil paints look the same when dry, but acrylic paints look slightly different as soon as they dry out. All you have to do is adjust the colors properly so that the end product is not different. For this, we suggest that you paint a small area of ​​the canvas and let it try to see the results.

So, if you have been looking for help with your canvas painting project, we suggest that you try out these 6 tips before making a start. Hopefully, these tips will make the job a lot easier for you.

Benefits Of Oil Paint

If you are a painter, you should consider using oil paint in your work. The paint is made up of a binder (the oil) and a thinner. The oil carries the pigments while the thinner makes the colors easy to apply to the surfaces using a brush. While there are many types of oil paints…

If you are a painter, you should consider using oil paint in your work. The paint is made up of a binder (the oil) and a thinner. The oil carries the pigments while the thinner makes the colors easy to apply to the surfaces using a brush. While there are many types of oil paints that you can go with, the most popular is linseed oil. It comes with plenty of benefits that include:

Longer drying time

If you are not experienced in painting, you might view this as a flaw, but it is not. Since the paint takes a long time to dry up, you have a lot of time to make any changes that you might be interested in. This makes it possible for you to achieve almost perfect paintings. If you have to travel and you are unable to finish your paint, you do not have to worry about finding the paint already dry. Reports have been made of some people leaving their paintings out in the air for days without worry of finding them dry.

Easy to work with

Compared to other mediums such as pastels and watercolor, oil is very easy to work with. When you apply the oil on canvas, it does not move or run so making it easy for you to paint your desired picture to perfection. As mentioned, the paint does not dry fast which makes it even simpler to work with it. In the event you make a mistake, you only need to use a knife to scrape off the paint and apply the right one.

A wide range of applications

In addition to having the ability to use the colors on different surfaces, you can also apply them in various ways. For example, you can apply them in thin glazes or even thick impastos. It all depends on the results you want to achieve.

Due to the ease of working with the paint, you can achieve a wide range of finishes and effects. You can have an opaque, transparent, and any other finish in between that you want. As mentioned above, it all depends on your objectives.

Conclusion

These are some of the benefits that come with oil paints. When buying the colors, buy from a reputable store to increase the chances of acquitting those of high quality. For ideal results, you should be keen in your painting. If you are not confident in your skills, you should hire an experienced professional to help you out.

6 Reasons Why You Should Buy Paintings Directly From Artists

When you decorate the walls in your home, there are a number of facts, that support you should buy paintings directly from an artist, instead of buying reproductions in online shops or physical shops. You get an original, unique painting that no one else has The painting is carefully created, down to the smallest detail…

When you decorate the walls in your home, there are a number of facts, that support you should buy paintings directly from an artist, instead of buying reproductions in online shops or physical shops.

  • You get an original, unique painting that no one else has
  • The painting is carefully created, down to the smallest detail
  • You get a quality product, made of excellent materials
  • You get the most bang for your buck – no commission to online or physical galleries
  • The selling price is higher when you want to make changes in your collection
  • You get a better service, the artist will answer any questions you have

You get an original unique painting

When you buy an original, unique painting from an artist, you get a unique piece of art, there is only one of one-of-a-kind.

And you can use the art to design the decor in your home with your own special touch, without any fear that your family, friends or neighbors already have the same painting or can imitate your decor.

If we look at the definition of the word “original”, the Danish Dictionary says it is an “object or phenomenon that is the basis for a copy.”

Be aware that many online and physical stores that advertise with “original” paintings, actually sell reproductions where the artistic value is practically non-existent.

Copies are typically made at art factories in China and other Eastern countries. The workers there does not always have the best working conditions. Employees work many hours a day without any breaks, and the production is made in buildings, that lack basic needs such as glass in window and heating during winter.

There is also a couple of Danish mass producing art factories, which employ Danish artists who produce copies under pseudonyms.

It may be difficult to spot whether it's a real or fictitious artist and if it's an original painting or a copy – here are a few tips you can use, factors that indicate it is a real artist:

Start by Googling the artist and see what information comes up. Does the artist's contact information appear, is having his own website, does the search show earlier exhibitions?

  • If there is an artist profile on the store's website, and it shows a photo and a biography of the artist.
  • If an artist profile with biography is attached to the painting, and there is shown a photograph of the artist.
  • Things that indicate it is an original unique painting:
  • If there is a real artist behind and not only a pseudonym.
  • If the painting is signed with the full name, title and year on the back of the canvas.

The painting is created with great care

Unique paintings, made by real life artists, are characterized by the artist using hours and hours of work on composition, texture, color composition and color blending. The result is an artwork with endless small details, beautiful colors and great depth, which means you will continuously discover new details, textures, and details.

Initially the artist plan the composition, style, subject, and medium. After that, the process of creating the painting consists of a series of different steps: priming of the canvas, applying texture pulse (1-3 operations), painting the subject (1-5 operations), top finish and at last, a topcoat .

It varies a lot, how many times an artist must work on a painting before it is ready for the public, but typically it's worked over 5-10 times. Especially when the creation requires many thin translucent layers and transparent colors, it has to be worked over many times.

Characteristic for the production of reproductions is, that there is very little time for producing each painting, usually there are only 15-20 minutes available.

This means, that it is only possible to make a painting with a maximum of three layers before it is ready. Often the painting will be manufactured in one process, and the employee is parallel working on up to 50 copies of identical paintings. Therefore, reproductions are often missing details and depth.

You get a quality product

Many artists take pride in using paint, materials and tools in a very high quality.

Basically, a distinction is made between three different qualities within artist paint: School quality, student quality, and artist quality.

What factors do determine the quality of the painting? It's a question of the pigments being used, the proportion pigments have relative to the fillers, and the bindings.

The highest quality paint is using the most expensive pigments, the largest share of pigments and contains little or no fillers.

School quality is the cheapest and is used for training in school classes. It's not suitable for a real painting, used to decorate your home with, since the poor quality means difficulties in mixing with other colors, the paint can not maintain the texture and dries to a flat shape, and lack colors fade resistance, opacity, tinting strength and transparency.

Student quality is a basic paint, which is used for priming of paintings and opaque surfaces. It is a sound quality, that has some good characteristics so the colors can be mixed, and they keep the texture to an acceptable degree. The only problem is, that these colors have trouble showing transparency without the use of mediums.

Artist quality is top of the line with high lightfastness, high opacity, strong color tinting and high transparency. All in all, it gives the possibility of making paintings with very fine details, brilliant colors, and great depth. And the high proportion of pigments secures that the paintings will have a long shelf life, without the colors starting to fade away or paint flaking off.

The professional artist uses canvas in good quality, made of cotton and / or linen.

The vast majority of artists always finish the process with a layer of protection in the form of varnish or gel. It secures a painting that will last for many years, and also makes it easier to clean.

Reproductions usually use artist paint in school quality and student quality – the outstanding artist quality will not be used because of a high price. And copies do not get the topcoat that protects against UV rays and sunlight and provides durability for many years to come.

The canvas they use are often made of 100% polyester, providing a rigid surface, that is unable to stretch with the paint under various humidity conditions.

You get the most bang for your buck

If artists are selling through online or physical galleries, they often have to pay up to 50% of the sales amount to gallery owners.

Obviously when you are dealing directly with the artist, there is no paid commission, and there is that no costually intermediaries to monetize on the artwork.

The selling price is higher

When you want to sell a painting you initially bought from a professional artist, the prices keep a higher level, compared to copy paintings you buy online and in physical stores.

Generally, you can get approximately the same amount as your buying price for paintings purchased from an artist, whereas reproductions fall drastically in price, so you only get about 25% of the amount you originally paid.

And if you spot a talented artist, you can make money when you sell again.

It requires a lot of practice, and that you know what to look for when buying art.

You get a better service

When you deal directly with a professional artist, he or she will answer any questions you have. Whether it comes to design, materials, maintenance or otherwise.

And you have of course also the possibility of letting the artist creating a unique piece with your own colors and designs.

Many artists also offer to help with transportation.

Painting Realistic Pictures Without Drawing

Do you wish you could paint real pictures but have always been put off because you can not draw? I have created a system which overcomes the drawing problem and opens up a wonderful hobby for people who have always thought it was something they just could not do. I take the drawing problem away…

Do you wish you could paint real pictures but have always been put off because you can not draw? I have created a system which overcomes the drawing problem and opens up a wonderful hobby for people who have always thought it was something they just could not do.

I take the drawing problem away by providing an outline which you transfer to your painting paper. Then with detailed step-by-step instructions, accompanied by photos, I show you exactly how to achieve a fine painting. There are paintings from beginner level 1 to more advanced level 5.

This is real painting, not coloring in or painting by numbers. You learn proper painting skills including the very important skill of blending. Blending means making two colors next to each other merge gradually instead of having a sharp join. For example, the stem of a flower is round, not flat. By blending the colors you can make it appear round. Without blending it would just be flat and not lifelike. Blending is vital to realistic painting, and is widely used to give shape and depth to faces, body parts, flowers, jewels, fruit, wineglasses, and many more.

Some people worry that using an outline is cheating, and that any artist should do all the drawing. I'll let you into a secret. Many professional painters are not very good at drawing and need help. For a small painting they may take a photo, and trace it so that they can transfer the tracing to the painting surface. For a large painting some artists use a projector to shine an image onto a canvas and draw around it. Others who are better at drawing still do not draw straight onto their painting paper or canvas. They do the drawing on paper and work on it, rubbing out mistakes and doing it again until they are satisfied it is good enough to transfer. Using a grid of squares to get the proportions right has a long history and was a method employed by some of the great masters. Using some form of drawing aid is very common and you should not in any way feel that there is something wrong with it. It will allow you to achieve a painting that you would have thought was completely beyond your abilities

I did all the paintings with an opaque water paint which is very easy to use. I do not recommend oil paints for people who are new to this style of painting. They are more difficult to use than water paint. The aim of my method is to show people how to achieve paintings that they would not have thought possible. It is very important that the paint should be easy to use and not involve unnecessary complications. Of course, after building up some experience you might want to explore oil paints. Why not? You never know how far you might go once you have been supported to get started. You might amaze yourself with what you can do!

Sanity In A Psyche Ward

The most highly paid living artist lives in a psyche ward in Tokyo. When she stops painting or creating, she becomes suicidal. Her art therapy began while undergoing treatment for her mental illness. She has had visual hallucinations since she was a child and has been painting them ever since. Her recent exhibit in Washington…

The most highly paid living artist lives in a psyche ward in Tokyo. When she stops painting or creating, she becomes suicidal. Her art therapy began while undergoing treatment for her mental illness. She has had visual hallucinations since she was a child and has been painting them ever since.

Her recent exhibit in Washington DC., Drew record crowds and caused lotteries, scalping and endless lines. Extra staff was added to accommodate the extra large crowds and the show took two years to plan and execute.

At 88, she entered into the reality of creating a new museum in Japan. It has now opened and Ms. Kusama claims she is only getting started-rare words for an octogenarian.

She has just signed yet another clothing deal. Her daily rule includes leaving the confines of a mental institution to walk to a nearby artist's studio where she paints every day from 9am to 5pm. She then returns to her room in the hospital where her status is referred to as 'fragile.'

In her twenties, Kusama wrote to Georgia O'Keefe and sent some of her paintings. To her surprise, O'Keefe responded. Kusama then decided to leave her homeland of Japan to avoid her family's expectation of marrying a designated man. That is the decision that bought her to America where she landed in New York City.

In Kusama's initial work, she painted huge works called “Infinity Nets.” Her repetition of pattern was manic. She attempted to paint polka dots on everything from people to food as well as thousands of canvases. From the early years until today, Kusama strides toward 'self-obliteration' through painting.

As a contemporary Japanese artist, she visits a variety of media with her work-painting, sculpture, film and installation. Her body of work shows strong repetition and densely patterned motifs. She exploits the use of repetition. She explores infinity and she is obsessively negating the self.

She returned to Japan from the states in the '70s where she has lived in a mental hospital ever since. After falling into obscurity for decades, her talent received heightened recognition after a memorable showing in the 1993 Venice Biennale.

As fragile as she is, her work ethic has carried with her through the years. And still today, she describes having constant hallucinations. When she talks about her work, she claims she notices as excited as a child and filled with 'mountains of energy.'

Today when she attends exhibits, she always has an exit strategy. If her mood changes or she gets confused, her assistants quickly whisk her away and back to the safety of the hospital.

Doctors have tried to medicate her but she does not like to alter her natural imaging of things. She might be the first artist to accurately capture an hallucination. Or maybe she is one herself.

Acrylic Water Based Paint Options for Students and Professional Artists

Acrylic water-based paints are great for artists for several reasons. It is one of the most flexible paints available and has a lot of other benefits. For starters, acrylic water based paints can be used to paint on just about any surface from paper to canvas board. One feature of acrylic that some consider a…

Acrylic water-based paints are great for artists for several reasons. It is one of the most flexible paints available and has a lot of other benefits. For starters, acrylic water based paints can be used to paint on just about any surface from paper to canvas board. One feature of acrylic that some consider a con is the fact that acrylic water-based paint dries very quickly. Some artists use no more than 15% of a retarder to slow down this quick drying process. Others use a stay wet palette while they paint.

Different Kinds of Acrylic Water Based Paint for Artists to Choose From

As previously stated, acrylic water-based paint offers up a lot of flexibility including the different kinds that are available to artists, from students to professionals. Although similar in grade to the kind of acrylics used by professionals, student acrylic tend to be lower in pigmentation, have less colors to choose from, and formulas that are less expensive than acrylic water paints used by professionals. Professional acrylics have more options and are as a rule more expensive. Professional water-based acrylic paint options are also more resistant to chemical and water exposure.

Additionally, water-based acrylic paints are classified by their 'body', which is a term used to indicate its consistency. Some are soft or medium bodied, others are heavy-bodied, and others still are super heavy or extra-bodied. Below we look at some of this acrylic water based paint varieties and grades and what they mean for student and professional artists alike.

1. Pigments, pricing, and color range

True paint pigments are expensive. Hues, which are an imitation of the authentic pigment are much more affordable. Student grade acronyms are usually available as hues. As for professional acrylics, pigments are grouped into series by numbers (citing from 1 onwards) and letters (moving from A upwards). The higher the series number, or farther away from A the letter is, the richer the pigment and the more expensive it is likely to be. As a rule, professional artist grade acrylic water based paint will have more real colors available in their range, and will be more expensive than those available to student artists.

2. Opacity

Acrylic water based paint options that are more opaque are easier to cover and be covered over by other colors. As such, these options are great for students who may be more prone to making mistakes that they will need to cover up.

3. Consistency or body of the available options

As mentioned before, water based acrylic paints are available in different consistencies including mediums and heavy paints. Professional artist grade acrylic paints will have a wider range of consistency available, while the student options will have less. Importantly, there are binders that can be mixed with the different consistencies, allowing the artist to control how thick or thin the paint is, without losing the richness of the pigment.

4. Tinting Strength and Color Shift

Tinting refer to how much paint is needed in order to alter the color of white paint. The higher the tinting strength of the paint, the less paint is needed to change the color of the white paint. This is something for student artists in particular to bear in mind.

Color shift is something that naturally takes place when using acrylic water based paint. This is due mainly to the fact that the paint goes darker after it is dried. The acrylic emulsion becomes clear as the paint dries (it is white when wet) and in this way darkens the color of the paint. In student quality acrylic water based paint, the binder used is white, as such the color shift from lighter to darker is usually greater than in professional grade paint options. The cheaper the student artist acrylic paint option, the whiter the binder used, and therefore the greater the color shift.

All the above characteristics serve as a rule of thumb guide for both student and professional artists alike. They should be considered when deciding which acrylic paint to use or not use to get the job done. Remember that acrylic water based paint is very flexible, but student grade options less so. The more you wish to do with the paint, including using binders and different chemical mixes, the more necessary it will be to get professional grade options.